Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2022) | Viewed by 8507

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Interests: microbial diversity; microbial ecology; metabolites; enzymes
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Biology, Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan, Armenia
Interests: microbial community; extremophiles; molecular biology; biotechnology; mycology; microbiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea are a highly diverse group of prokaryotes adapted to life at high temperatures, with optimal growth in 50 oC to over 100 oC regions. Studies of thermophiles have extended our understanding of the physical limits at which life can exist and helped to decode the early stages of life’s evolution. These microorganisms have served as important models for revealing the mechanisms of molecular and physiological high-temperature adaptations and provided numerous opportunities for novel biotechnological developments based on the robustness of their cells and sub-cellular components. In this Special Issue, recent advancements in our understanding of the fundamental biology of thermophiles, their diversity, ecological roles, enzymes and biotechnological applications will be presented in the form of original research papers and reviews.

Prof. Dr. Nils-Kåre Birkeland
Dr. Hovik Panosyan
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • thermophilic bacteria
  • thermophilic archaea
  • thermophiles
  • diversity
  • ecological roles
  • enzymes
  • biotechnological applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2524 KiB  
Article
Fervidobacterium pennivorans subsp. keratinolyticus subsp. nov., a Novel Feather-Degrading Anaerobic Thermophile
by Rubén Javier-Lopez, Edoardo Mandolini, Munavvara Dzhuraeva, Khursheda Bobodzhanova and Nils-Kåre Birkeland
Microorganisms 2023, 11(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11010022 - 21 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Fervidobacterium pennivorans subsp. keratinolyticus subsp. nov. strain T was isolated from a terrestrial, high-altitude hot spring in Tajikistan. This strain is an obligate anaerobic rod and their cells occur singly, in pairs, or as short chains under the optimal growth conditions of a [...] Read more.
Fervidobacterium pennivorans subsp. keratinolyticus subsp. nov. strain T was isolated from a terrestrial, high-altitude hot spring in Tajikistan. This strain is an obligate anaerobic rod and their cells occur singly, in pairs, or as short chains under the optimal growth conditions of a temperature of 65 °C and pH 6.5, with peptone, glucose, and galactose as the preferred substrates. The minimum generation time of this strain is 150 min. Strain T can efficiently degrade feather keratin at 65–75 °C; this unusual feature is also exhibited by a few other members of the Fervidobacterium genus. The total genome size of this bacterial strain is 2,002,515 base pairs, with a C + G content of 39.0%. The maximum digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) value of 76.9% was observed on comparing the genome of this strain with that of Fervidobacterium pennivorans type strain DSM9078. This study describes the physiological and genomic properties of strain T, with an emphasis on its keratinolytic power and differences from other members of the genus Fervidobacterium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea)
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10 pages, 1210 KiB  
Article
Isolation and Characterization of Thermophilic Bacteria from Hot Springs in Republic of Korea
by Yong-Jik Lee, Dariimaa Ganbat, DoKyung Oh, HyeWon Kim, Ga Eul Jeong, In-Tae Cha, Seong-Bo Kim, Gaewon Nam, You-Jung Jung and Sang-Jae Lee
Microorganisms 2022, 10(12), 2375; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10122375 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3228
Abstract
Thermophiles that produce extracellular hydrolases are of great importance due to their applications in various industries. Thermophilic enzymes are of interest for industrial applications due to their compatibility with industrial processes, and the availability of the organisms is essential to develop their full [...] Read more.
Thermophiles that produce extracellular hydrolases are of great importance due to their applications in various industries. Thermophilic enzymes are of interest for industrial applications due to their compatibility with industrial processes, and the availability of the organisms is essential to develop their full potential. In this study, a culture-dependent approach was used to identify thermophilic bacteria from five hot springs in Republic of Korea. Characterization, taxonomic identification, and extracellular hydrolase (amylase, lipase, and protease) activity of 29 thermophilic bacterial isolates from the Neungam carbonate, Mungang sulfur, Deokgu, Baegam, and Dongnae hot springs were investigated. Identification based on the full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strains belonged to the phylum Bacillota and were classified as Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Caldibacillus, Geobacillus, and Thermoactinomyces genera. It was found that 22 isolates could produce at least one extracellular enzyme. Geobacillus, representing 41.4% of the isolates, was the most abundant. The highest amount of proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes was secreted by strains of the genus Geobacillus, whereas Caldibacillus species produced the highest amount of amylolytic enzyme. The Geobacillus species producing hydrolytic extracellular enzymes appeared to be the most promising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea)
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11 pages, 2051 KiB  
Article
Thermophilic Chloroflexi Dominate in the Microbial Community Associated with Coal-Fire Gas Vents in the Kuznetsk Coal Basin, Russia
by Vitaly V. Kadnikov, Andrey V. Mardanov, Alexey V. Beletsky, Mikhail A. Grigoriev, Olga V. Karnachuk and Nikolai V. Ravin
Microorganisms 2021, 9(5), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9050948 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2915
Abstract
Thermal ecosystems associated with areas of underground burning coal seams are rare and poorly understood in comparison with geothermal objects. We studied the microbial communities associated with gas vents from the coal-fire in the mining wastes in the Kemerovo region of the Russian [...] Read more.
Thermal ecosystems associated with areas of underground burning coal seams are rare and poorly understood in comparison with geothermal objects. We studied the microbial communities associated with gas vents from the coal-fire in the mining wastes in the Kemerovo region of the Russian Federation. The temperature of the ground heated by the hot coal gases and steam coming out to the surface was 58 °C. Analysis of the composition of microbial communities revealed the dominance of Ktedonobacteria (the phylum Chloroflexi), known to be capable of oxidizing hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Thermophilic hydrogenotrophic Firmicutes constituted a minor part of the community. Among the well-known thermophiles, members of the phyla Aquificae, Deinococcus-Thermus and Bacteroidetes were also found. In the upper ground layer, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, as well as Proteobacteria of the alpha and gamma classes, typical of soils, were detected; their relative abundancies decreased with depth. The phylum Verrucomicrobia was dominated by Candidatus Udaeobacter, aerobic heterotrophs capable of generating energy through the oxidation of hydrogen present in the atmosphere in trace amounts. Archaea made up a small part of the communities and were represented by thermophilic ammonium-oxidizers. Overall, the community was dominated by bacteria, whose cultivated relatives are able to obtain energy through the oxidation of the main components of coal gases, hydrogen and carbon monoxide, under aerobic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea)
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