Microbial Fermentation: From Waste to Biofuel

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019) | Viewed by 8820

Special Issue Editor

Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 501 90 Borås, Sweden
Interests: waste biorefinery; bioprocess; ethanol; biogas; pretreatment; fermentation; fungi
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The global population has grown, elevating greenhouse gas emissions to critical levels, and environmental awareness has led to considering more sustainable development, where moving from a linear economy to circular economy is becoming a demand. Microorganisms are natural tools to achieve this circularly. They consume our municipal and industrial solid waste as well as wastewater and agricultural residuals, while also producing biofuels, including alcohols (methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.), gases (biogas and hydrogen), or the metabolites or cell biomass (such as algae), that can be converted into biofuels (e.g., biodiesel). This Special Issue aims to explore microorganisms and their functions for this purpose.

Prof. Mohammad Taherzadeh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solid wastes
  • wastewaters
  • agricultural residuals
  • biofuels
  • microbial fermentation

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

11 pages, 1385 KiB  
Article
Accelerating the Biodegradation of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) Using Bjerkandera adusta TBB-03 and Lignocellulose Substrates
Microorganisms 2019, 7(9), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7090304 - 31 Aug 2019
Cited by 39 | Viewed by 5188
Abstract
High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is a widely used organic polymer and an emerging pollutant, because it is very stable and nonbiodegradable. Several fungal species that produce delignifying enzymes are known to be promising degraders of recalcitrant polymers, but research on the decomposition of plastics [...] Read more.
High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is a widely used organic polymer and an emerging pollutant, because it is very stable and nonbiodegradable. Several fungal species that produce delignifying enzymes are known to be promising degraders of recalcitrant polymers, but research on the decomposition of plastics is scarce. In this study, white rot fungus, Bjerkandera adusta TBB-03, was isolated and characterized for its ability to degrade HDPE under lignocellulose substrate treatment. Ash (Fraxinus rhynchophylla) wood chips were found to stimulate laccase production (activity was > 210 U/L after 10 days of cultivation), and subsequently used for HDPE degradation assay. After 90 days, cracks formed on the surface of HDPE samples treated with TBB-03 and ash wood chips in both liquid and solid states. Raman analysis showed that the amorphous structure of HDPE was degraded by enzymes produced by TBB-03. Overall, TBB-03 is a promising resource for the biodegradation of HDPE, and this work sheds light on further applications for fungus-based plastic degradation systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Fermentation: From Waste to Biofuel)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

14 pages, 1876 KiB  
Review
Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) for Heat, Gas, and Production of a Class A Biosolids with Fertilizer Potential
Microorganisms 2019, 7(8), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7080215 - 25 Jul 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3222
Abstract
Autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) is a microbial fermentation process characterized as a tertiary treatment of waste material carried out in jacketed reactors. The process can be carried out on a variety of waste sludge ranging from human, animal, food, or pharmaceutical waste [...] Read more.
Autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) is a microbial fermentation process characterized as a tertiary treatment of waste material carried out in jacketed reactors. The process can be carried out on a variety of waste sludge ranging from human, animal, food, or pharmaceutical waste where the addition of air initiates aerobic digestion of the secondary treated sludge material. Digestion of the sludge substrates generates heat, which is retained within the reactor resulting in elevation of the reactor temperature to 70–75 °C. During the process, deamination of proteinaceous materials also occurs resulting in liberation of ammonia and elevation of pH to typically pH 8.4. These conditions result in a unique microbial consortium, which undergoes considerable dynamic change during the heat-up and holding phases. The change in pH and substrate as digestion occurs also contributes to this dynamic change. Because the large reactors are not optimized for aeration, and because low oxygen solubility at elevated temperatures occurs, there are considerable numbers of anaerobes recovered which also contributes to the overall digestion. As the reactors are operated in a semi-continuous mode, the reactors are rarely washed, resulting in considerable biofilm formation. Equally, because of the fibrous nature of the sludge, fiber adhering organisms are frequently found which play a major role in the overall digestion process. Here, we review molecular tools needed to examine the ATAD sludge consortia, what has been determined through phylogenetic analysis of the consortia and the nature of the dynamics occurring within this unique fermentation environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Fermentation: From Waste to Biofuel)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop