Halophilic Microorganisms 2.0

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2024 | Viewed by 3176

Special Issue Editor

Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
Interests: taxonomy; halophilic microorganism; metagenomic; biodiversity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the continuation of our previous special issue "Halophilic Microorganisms"

Halophiles are microorganisms adapted for living at hypersaline environments and other saline products. Most of them belong to the bacteria and archaea domains, and their interest is of special relevance both for their adaptation mechanisms to extreme conditions and for their potential biotechnological applications. In recent years, the isolation and taxonomic characterization of halophiles have allowed us to learn more in detail about their heterogeneity, their metabolic and physiological diversity, or ecological distribution and biodiversity. Culture-independent techniques, such as metagenomics and -omics studies, are particularly providing an incentive these studies on halophiles to continue, as there is still an immense field to explore in this regard.

In this Special Issue of Microorganisms, you are invited to send contributions (original articles as well as reviews) concerning the biology, taxonomy, biodiversity, and biotechnological applications of halophilic microorganisms, as well as using genomic and metagenomic approaches to study microbial communities. Information that will improve our understanding of the role of halophilic microorganisms in hypersaline environments, their adaptation to the environmental conditions, their genetic and functional diversity, and their phylogenetic position is especially welcome.

Dr. Cristina Sánchez-Porro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • obligate halophiles
  • bacteria
  • archaea
  • taxonomy and biodiversity
  • biotechnology
  • genomics
  • metagenomics
  • physiology and metabolism
  • hypersaline habitats

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 5340 KiB  
Article
The Hypersaline Soils of the Odiel Saltmarshes Natural Area as a Source for Uncovering a New Taxon: Pseudidiomarina terrestris sp. nov
Microorganisms 2024, 12(2), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12020375 - 11 Feb 2024
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Abstract
The hypersaline soils of the Odiel Saltmarshes Natural Area are an extreme environment with high levels of some heavy metals; however, it is a relevant source of prokaryotic diversity that we aim to explore. In this study, six strains related to the halophilic [...] Read more.
The hypersaline soils of the Odiel Saltmarshes Natural Area are an extreme environment with high levels of some heavy metals; however, it is a relevant source of prokaryotic diversity that we aim to explore. In this study, six strains related to the halophilic genus Pseudidiomarina were isolated from this habitat. The phylogenetic study based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the fingerprinting analysis suggested that they constituted a single new species within the genus Pseudidiomarina. Comparative genomic analysis based on the OGRIs indices and the phylogeny inferred from the core genome were performed considering all the members of the family Idiomarinaceae. Additionally, a completed phenotypic characterization, as well as the fatty acid profile, were also carried out. Due to the characteristics of the habitat, genomic functions related to salinity and high heavy metal concentrations were studied, along with the global metabolism of the six isolates. Last, the ecological distribution of the isolates was studied in different hypersaline environments by genome recruitment. To sum up, the six strains constitute a new species within the genus Pseudidiomarina, for which the name Pseudidiomarina terrestris sp. nov. is proposed. The low abundance in all the studied hypersaline habitats indicates that it belongs to the rare biosphere in these habitats. In silico genome functional analysis suggests the presence of heavy metal transporters and pathways for nitrate reduction and nitrogen assimilation in low availability, among other metabolic traits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Halophilic Microorganisms 2.0)
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15 pages, 354 KiB  
Article
Reduction in Salt Stress Due to the Action of Halophilic Bacteria That Promote Plant Growth in Solanum lycopersicum
Microorganisms 2023, 11(11), 2625; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11112625 - 25 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Soil salinity is one of the most important factors reducing agricultural productivity worldwide. Halophilic plant growth-promoting bacteria (H-PGPB) represent an alternative method of alleviating saline stress in crops of agricultural interest. In this study, the following halophilic bacteria were evaluated: Bacillus sp. SVHM1.1, [...] Read more.
Soil salinity is one of the most important factors reducing agricultural productivity worldwide. Halophilic plant growth-promoting bacteria (H-PGPB) represent an alternative method of alleviating saline stress in crops of agricultural interest. In this study, the following halophilic bacteria were evaluated: Bacillus sp. SVHM1.1, Halomonas sp. SVCN6, Halomonas sp. SVHM8, and a consortium. They were grown under greenhouse conditions in Solanum lycopersicum at different salinity concentrations in irrigation water (0, 20, 60, and 100 mM NaCl) to determine the effects on germination, fruit quality, yield, and concentration of osmoprotectors in plant tissue. Our results demonstrate the influence of halophilic bacteria with the capacity to promote plant growth on the germination and development of Solanum lycopersicum at higher salinity levels. The germination percentage was improved at the highest concentration by the inoculated treatments (from 37 to 47%), as were the length of the radicle (30% at 20 mM) and plumule of the germinated seed, this bacterium also increased the weight of the plumule (97% at 100 mM). They also improved the yield. The dry weight of the plant, in addition to having an influence on the quality of the fruit and the concentration of osmoprotectors (Bacillus sp. SVHM 1.1) had the greatest effect on fruit yield (1.5 kg/plant at 20 mM), by the otherhand, Halomonas sp. SVHM8 provided the best fruit quality characteristics at 100 mM. According to the above results, the efficiency of halophilic PGPB in the attenuation of salt stress in Solanum lycopersicum has been proven. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Halophilic Microorganisms 2.0)
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20 pages, 694 KiB  
Review
Halophilic Plant-Associated Bacteria with Plant-Growth-Promoting Potential
Microorganisms 2023, 11(12), 2910; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11122910 - 02 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The salinization of soils is a growing agricultural concern worldwide. Irrigation practices, drought, and climate change are leading to elevated salinity levels in many regions, resulting in reduced crop yields. However, there is potential for a solution in the microbiome of halophytes, which [...] Read more.
The salinization of soils is a growing agricultural concern worldwide. Irrigation practices, drought, and climate change are leading to elevated salinity levels in many regions, resulting in reduced crop yields. However, there is potential for a solution in the microbiome of halophytes, which are naturally salt-tolerant plants. These plants harbor a salt-tolerant microbiome in their rhizosphere (around roots) and endosphere (within plant tissue). These bacteria may play a significant role in conferring salt tolerance to the host plants. This leads to the possibility of transferring these beneficial bacteria, known as salt-tolerant plant-growth-promoting bacteria (ST-PGPB), to salt-sensitive plants, enabling them to grow in salt-affected areas to improve crop productivity. In this review, the background of salt-tolerant microbiomes is discussed and their potential use as ST-PGPB inocula is explored. We focus on two Gram-negative bacterial genera, Halomonas and Kushneria, which are commonly found in highly saline environments. These genera have been found to be associated with some halophytes, suggesting their potential for facilitating ST-PGPB activity. The study of salt-tolerant microbiomes and their use as PGPB holds promise for addressing the challenges posed by soil salinity in the context of efforts to improve crop growth in salt-affected areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Halophilic Microorganisms 2.0)
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