Intestine as a Hub for Host-Microbe Interactions and Its Impact on Local and Systemic Health

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Gut Microbiota".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1084

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health, Federal University of Goiás, Goiania 74605-050, GO, Brazil
Interests: innate immunity; TREM; microbiota; inflammation; immune receptors; infection

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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa 58051-900, Paraíba, Brazil
Interests: gut microbiota; probiotics; nutrition; arterial hypertension; metabolic disease; translational studies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The intestine is one of the richest niches of microorganisms harboring a diverse and complex population, which directly or indirectly influence host physiology and metabolism. Gut health encompasses a number of biological features and functions, including nutrient digestion and absorption, host metabolism and energy generation, a eubiotic microbiome, mucus layer development, barrier function and mucosal immune responses. Different aspects can disturb gut microbial composition (also known as dysbiosis), which in turn may represent a cause or consequence of local and systemic disorders. Among the potential triggers of gut microbiota dysbiosis, it is possible to highlight nutritional status, environmental pollution, lifestyle, infections (local or systemic), stress and inflammatory/metabolic disorders. Thus, increasing current knowledge in this complex and multifaceted field is of great importance for scientific and clinical communities.

This Special Issue will focus on the importance of the intestine as a hub for the host–microbe interaction in different contexts. Studies that will help demonstrate the impact of the aforementioned triggers in gut dysbiosis are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Helioswilton Sales-Campos
Prof. Dr. José Luiz de Brito Alves
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • microbiota
  • gut pathogens
  • immune response
  • inflammation
  • dysbiosis
  • infection
  • nutritional status

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1788 KiB  
Article
A Mix of Potentially Probiotic Limosilactobacillus fermentum Strains Alters the Gut Microbiota in a Dose- and Sex-Dependent Manner in Wistar Rats
by Lucas Alves Carneiro dos Santos, Rodrigo Dias de Oliveira Carvalho, José Patrocínio Ribeiro Cruz Neto, Deborah Emanuelle de Albuquerque Lemos, Kataryne Árabe Rimá de Oliveira, Karoliny Brito Sampaio, Micaelle Oliveira de Luna Freire, Flavia Figueira Aburjaile, Vasco Ariston de Carvalho Azevedo, Evandro Leite de Souza and José Luiz de Brito Alves
Microorganisms 2024, 12(4), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms12040659 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 725
Abstract
Multi-strain Limosilactobacillus (L.) fermentum is a potential probiotic with reported immunomodulatory properties. This study aimed to evaluate the composition, richness, and diversity of the gut microbiota in male and female rats after treatment with a multi-strain of L. fermentum at different doses. Thirty [...] Read more.
Multi-strain Limosilactobacillus (L.) fermentum is a potential probiotic with reported immunomodulatory properties. This study aimed to evaluate the composition, richness, and diversity of the gut microbiota in male and female rats after treatment with a multi-strain of L. fermentum at different doses. Thirty rats (fifteen male and fifteen female) were allocated into a control group (CTL), a group receiving L. fermentum at a dose of 108 CFU (Lf-108), and a group receiving L. fermentum at a dose of 1010 CFU (Lf-1010) for 13 weeks. Gut microbiota and serum cytokine levels were evaluated after L. fermentum treatment. Male CTL rats had a lower relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae and Prevotella and a lower alpha diversity than their female CTL counterparts (p < 0.05). In addition, male CTL rats had a higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratio than female CTL rats (p < 0.05). In female rats, the administration of L. fermentum at 108 CFU decreased the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae and Anaerobiospirillum and increased Lactobacillus (p < 0.05). In male rats, the administration of L. fermentum at 1010 CFU decreased the F/B ratio and increased Lachnospiraceae and the diversity of the gut microbiota (p < 0.05). The relative abundance of Lachnospiraceae and the alpha-diversity of gut microbiota were negatively correlated with serum levels of IL1β (r = −0.44) and TNFα (r = −0.39), respectively. This study identified important changes in gut microbiota between male and female rats and showed that a lower dose of L. fermentum may have more beneficial effects on gut microbiota in females, while a higher dose may result in more beneficial effects on gut microbiota in male rats. Full article
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