Foodborne Microorganisms and Biofilms

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 2731

Special Issue Editors

Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: biofilms; foodborne microorganisms; food biopreservation; antimicrobials; anti-biofilm agents
Department of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: microbial ecology; molds; mycotoxin; biofilms; antimicrobial compounds; fermented food
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of Microorganisms on Foodborne Microorganisms and Biofilms.

Foodborne microbial biofilm is a serious concern in the food industry. Biofilm formation is a dynamic multi-step process where microbial motility, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production, and quorum sensing (QS) systems play an important role. Biofilms are difficult to eradicate because cells in biofilms are more tolerant to antimicrobial agents and less sensitive to environmental stresses than their planktonic counterparts. In addition to representing a constant source of contamination in the food industry, and thus compromising food safety and quality, microbial biofilms can cause damage to equipment. Both chemical and physical strategies are commonly used to control microbial biofilms in the food industry. Nevertheless, to overcome the drawbacks of anti-biofilm conventional strategies, such as induced tolerance or spreading of surviving microorganisms, new strategies are being developed, including the use of natural and eco-friendly agents.

This Special Issue aims to report recent findings and advances on the following topics, including but not limited to:

  • Study of the factors contributing to biofilm formation by microorganisms of food interest.
  • Quality and health aspects associated with biofilms in foods and food processing environments.
  • Characterization of multi-species biofilms of foodborne microorganisms.
  • Omics techniques for a better understanding of foodborne microbial biofilms.
  • Emerging and promising strategies for detecting, preventing, and controlling foodborne microbial biofilms.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Chiara Rossi
Dr. Clemencia Chaves-López
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foodborne microorganisms
  • biofilms
  • food industry
  • multi-species biofilms
  • motility
  • extracellular polymeric substances
  • quorum sensing
  • omics
  • anti-biofilm agents

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

22 pages, 2272 KiB  
Article
Distinct Microbiotas Are Associated with Different Production Lines in the Cutting Room of a Swine Slaughterhouse
Microorganisms 2023, 11(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11010133 - 04 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2062
Abstract
The microorganisms found on fresh, raw meat cuts at a slaughterhouse can influence the meat’s safety and spoilage patterns along further stages of processing. However, little is known about the general microbial ecology of the production environment of slaughterhouses. We used 16s rRNA [...] Read more.
The microorganisms found on fresh, raw meat cuts at a slaughterhouse can influence the meat’s safety and spoilage patterns along further stages of processing. However, little is known about the general microbial ecology of the production environment of slaughterhouses. We used 16s rRNA sequencing and diversity analysis to characterize the microbiota heterogeneity on conveyor belt surfaces in the cutting room of a swine slaughterhouse from different production lines (each associated with a particular piece/cut of meat). Variation of the microbiota over a period of time (six visits) was also evaluated. Significant differences of alpha and beta diversity were found between the different visits and between the different production lines. Bacterial genera indicative of each visit and production line were also identified. We then created random forest models that, based on the microbiota of each sample, allowed us to predict with 94% accuracy to which visit a sample belonged and to predict with 88% accuracy from which production line it was taken. Our results suggest a possible influence of meat cut on processing surface microbiotas, which could lead to better prevention, surveillance, and control of microbial contamination of meat during processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Microorganisms and Biofilms)
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