Biopathology of Microbial Infections 2.0

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 4913

Special Issue Editors

School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Karditsa, Greece
Interests: diagnosis; prevention; epidemiology of medical infections
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Thessaly, 224 Trikalon, 43100 Karditsa, Greece
Interests: goat; health management; mastitis; milk quality; sheep
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a continuation of our previous Special Issue, “Biopathology of Microbial Infections”.

Microbial infections continue to be a global threat to public health. Furthermore, microbial diseases of animals can have significant economic impacts and zoonotic implications.

The use of antimicrobial agents enhances the emergence and dissemination of resistant microorganisms. The administration of antimicrobial agents to animals, especially food-producing species, also plays a role in transferring resistance genes of animal origins to humans.

In-depth knowledge of the virulence and pathogenicity of microorganisms is important for the diagnosis and control of these infections. Research into improved diagnostic approaches for microbial diseases, particularly those encompassing -omics approaches, can contribute to the quick and accurate diagnosis of microbial infections. Work into new therapeutic approaches, targeting the virulence factors of microorganisms (e.g., toxins, spores, and biofilms), will improve the clinical therapeutics of infections. Studies into the development of novel immunological products or improved management approaches will contribute to the effective control of microbial infections.

This Special Issue will focus on publications covering human and animal microbial infections, with special reference to work relevant to their diagnosis, therapeutics, and control. Researchers in the field are invited to submit cutting-edge work for evaluation and potential publication as part of this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Efthymia Petinaki
Prof. Dr. George Fthenakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance vehicles
  • biofilm
  • diagnosis
  • microbial infections
  • microcial omics
  • microbial targets
  • pathogenicity
  • prevention
  • staphylococci
  • spores
  • therapeutics
  • toxin
  • virulence factors
  • zoonoses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1320 KiB  
Article
Propylene Glycol Potentiates the Inhibitory Action of CTZ Paste on Antibiotic-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from the Root Canal: An In Vitro Study
Microorganisms 2023, 11(9), 2208; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11092208 - 31 Aug 2023
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Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate if the change of vehicle for CTZ (Chloramphenicol, Tetracycline, zinc oxide, and Eugenol) paste improves the inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro. The vehicles evaluated alone and mixed with CTZ were Eugenol, propylene glycol (PG), super-oxidized solution (SOS), [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate if the change of vehicle for CTZ (Chloramphenicol, Tetracycline, zinc oxide, and Eugenol) paste improves the inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro. The vehicles evaluated alone and mixed with CTZ were Eugenol, propylene glycol (PG), super-oxidized solution (SOS), grapefruit-seed extract (GSE), and 0.9% saline solution as a negative control. A clinical isolate of E. faecalis was morphologically and biochemically characterized, and its antimicrobial susceptibility was tested using 20 antimicrobial agents. Once characterized, the clinical isolate was cultivated to perform the Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method with paper discs embedded with the different vehicles mixed or used alone, and incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, and the means were compared using Tukey test with a significance level of p < 0.05. For vehicles used alone, GSE presented the greatest inhibition showing a statistically significant difference with the rest of the vehicles. When vehicles were mixed with the CTZ paste, PG showed a greater inhibition with a statistically significant difference from the rest of the vehicles. In conclusion, the vehicle used to mix the CTZ paste plays an important role in the inhibition of E. faecalis in vitro; therefore, we consider that this can be an important factor to achieve success in the use of this technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopathology of Microbial Infections 2.0)
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14 pages, 1374 KiB  
Article
Helminth Infections in Dairy Sheep Found in an Extensive Countrywide Study in Greece and Potential Predictors for Their Presence in Faecal Samples
Microorganisms 2023, 11(3), 571; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11030571 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1104
Abstract
The aims of the present study were: (a) to describe the prevalence of helminth infections from pooled faecal samples from sheep flocks across Greece and (b) to evaluate flock-related factors potentially associated with the presence of these infections in the flocks. An extensive [...] Read more.
The aims of the present study were: (a) to describe the prevalence of helminth infections from pooled faecal samples from sheep flocks across Greece and (b) to evaluate flock-related factors potentially associated with the presence of these infections in the flocks. An extensive countrywide study was performed on 325 sheep farms throughout Greece; faecal samples were collected from ewes and processed for the identification of helminth parasites. Helminths were detected in samples from 92.9% of flocks; these included Dicrocoelium dendriticum (16.7% of flocks), Fasciola hepatica (0.6%), Paramphistomum cervi (2.2%), Moniezia spp. (18.8%), Trichostrongylidae (85.5%), Nematodirus spp. (18.8%), Strongyloides papillosus (7.1%), Trichuris spp. (20.0%) and lungworms (17.8%). Mean Trichostrongylidae counts across all flocks in the study were 215 epg. Specifically, for Trichostrongylidae, there were differences between flocks that had or had not received anthelmintics during the two months prior to sampling, as well as between flocks located in various areas of the country. In multivariable analyses, for the outcome ‘high (>300) epg counts in faecal samples’, the month into the lactation period at sampling and the application of reproductive control practices on the farm emerged as significant factors; for the outcome ‘high proportion (>63%) of Teladorsagia spp. in faecal samples’, the availability of straw bedding emerged as a significant factor; and for the outcome ‘high proportion (>63%) of Haemonchus contortus in faecal samples’, the age of the farmer emerged as a significant factor. For the outcome ‘presence of Trichuris spp. in faecal samples’, the provision of finished feed (concentrate) to animals emerged as a significant factor, whilst, finally, for the outcomes ‘presence of D. dendriticum in faecal samples’ and ‘presence of lungworms in faecal samples,’ no significant factors emerged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopathology of Microbial Infections 2.0)
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