Health and Usage Monitoring Microsystems (HUMMs)

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2011) | Viewed by 19102

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Engineering & Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
Interests: built-in self testing; built-in self repair; microsensors; machine learning; microsystems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last ten years, there has been an increased interest in the design, manufacturing, deployment and management of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS). These meso-scale devices can be defined as multi-sensor systems capable of controlling the health of larger mechanical, electronic and more recently biological systems. HUMS are also used to monitor the usage of the larger systems that they are supposed to control and predict their reliability and lifetime. Traditionally employed for avionic and automotive applications, they are progressively encroaching into the sectors of healthcare and agriculture. With the miniaturization advantages offered by advances in semiconductor technology, HUMS have become HUMMs, where considerable research effort has been put into realizing multi-sensing functionalities at the micro-scale, transmitting the information subject to a limited power budget and ensuring the good management of potentially hundred of data streams.

In the face of the tremendous progress achieved in the field of HUMMs, Micromachines is proposing a Special Issue on HUMMs. Contributions are invited for all aspects of HUMMS ranging from the design, manufacturing, power budget, optimum smartness and deployment of such systems to their application in the various fields of science and engineering.

Marc Desmulliez
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • health and usage monitoring systems
  • multi-sensors systems
  • wireless sensor systems
  • data fusion

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Prognostics and Health Monitoring of High Power LED
by Thamo Sutharssan, Stoyan Stoyanov, Chris Bailey and Yasmine Rosunally
Micromachines 2012, 3(1), 78-100; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi3010078 - 24 Feb 2012
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 9124
Abstract
Prognostics is seen as a key component of health usage monitoring systems, where prognostics algorithms can both detect anomalies in the behavior/performance of a micro-device/system, and predict its remaining useful life when subjected to monitored operational and environmental conditions. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) [...] Read more.
Prognostics is seen as a key component of health usage monitoring systems, where prognostics algorithms can both detect anomalies in the behavior/performance of a micro-device/system, and predict its remaining useful life when subjected to monitored operational and environmental conditions. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are optoelectronic micro-devices that are now replacing traditional incandescent and fluorescent lighting, as they have many advantages including higher reliability, greater energy efficiency, long life time and faster switching speed. For some LED applications there is a requirement to monitor the health of LED lighting systems and predict when failure is likely to occur. This is very important in the case of safety critical and emergency applications. This paper provides both experimental and theoretical results that demonstrate the use of prognostics and health monitoring techniques for high power LEDs subjected to harsh operating conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Usage Monitoring Microsystems (HUMMs))
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1866 KiB  
Article
Development of a Microelectromechanical System (MEMS)-Based Multisensor Platform for Environmental Monitoring
by Mathieu Hautefeuille, Brendan O’Flynn, Frank H. Peters and Conor O’Mahony
Micromachines 2011, 2(4), 410-430; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi2040410 - 03 Nov 2011
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 9271
Abstract
Recent progress in data processing, communications and electronics miniaturization is now enabling the development of low-cost wireless sensor networks (WSN), which consist of spatially distributed autonomous sensor modules that collaborate to monitor real-time environmental conditions unobtrusively and with appropriate levels of spatial and [...] Read more.
Recent progress in data processing, communications and electronics miniaturization is now enabling the development of low-cost wireless sensor networks (WSN), which consist of spatially distributed autonomous sensor modules that collaborate to monitor real-time environmental conditions unobtrusively and with appropriate levels of spatial and temporal granularity. Recent and future applications of this technology range from preventative maintenance and quality control to environmental modelling and failure analysis. In order to fabricate these low-cost, low-power reliable monitoring platforms, it is necessary to improve the level of sensor integration available today. This paper outlines the microfabrication and characterization results of a multifunctional multisensor unit. An existing fabrication process for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor CMOS-compatible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) structures has been modified and extended to manufacture temperature, relative humidity, corrosion, gas thermal conductivity, and gas flow velocity sensors on a single silicon substrate. A dedicated signal conditioning circuit layer has been built around this MEMS multisensor die for integration on an existing low-power WSN module. The final unit enables accurate readings and cross-sensitivity compensation thanks to a combination of simultaneous readings from multiple sensors. Real-time communication to the outside world is ensured via radio-frequency protocols, and data collection in a serial memory is also made possible for diagnostics applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Usage Monitoring Microsystems (HUMMs))
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