Devices Based on Two-Dimensional Materials: Materials and Fabrication

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 4155

Special Issue Editors

Institute for Nanoelectronic Devices and Quantum Computing, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China
Interests: 2D materials; van der Waals heterostructures; micro/nanodevices; quantum transport
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Mechanical Science & Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: 2D materials; gas sensors; MEMS; micromanufacturing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The abundance of two-dimensional (2D) materials has led to unparalleled research prospects, promoting extensive exploration into their distinct electronic, optical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties. With their atomic thickness, substantial bandgaps and van der Waals layer coupling, these materials present highly desirable attributes for innovative device applications, providing remarkable tunability and design flexibility. The rapid evolution of controllable and scalable synthesis techniques for high-quality 2D materials and their heterostructures has paved the way for fabricating devices with extraordinary performance, encompassing transistors, memories, spintronic devices, photodetectors, transducers and sensing devices. This Special Issue is dedicated to spotlighting the advancements in devices based on 2D materials. We invite submissions of various types of papers, including research papers, communications and review articles, addressing topics such as (1) the exploration of novel electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of 2D materials and heterostructures, and (2) the fabrication of devices based on 2D materials, covering aspects like stacking, twisting, strain engineering and more, to reveal new physics and device applications.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Wu Shi
Dr. Hu Long
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • two-dimensional materials
  • van der Waals heterostructures
  • transistors
  • gas sensors
  • MEMS

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2038 KiB  
Article
Synthesis and Characterization of 2D Ternary Compound TMD Materials Ta3VSe8
by Yuanji Ma, Yuhan Du, Wenbin Wu, Zeping Shi, Xianghao Meng and Xiang Yuan
Micromachines 2024, 15(5), 591; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15050591 - 28 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are garnering considerable scientific interest, prompting discussion regarding their prospective applications in the fields of nanoelectronics and spintronics while also fueling groundbreaking discoveries in phenomena such as the fractional quantum anomalous Hall effect (FQAHE) and exciton dynamics. [...] Read more.
Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are garnering considerable scientific interest, prompting discussion regarding their prospective applications in the fields of nanoelectronics and spintronics while also fueling groundbreaking discoveries in phenomena such as the fractional quantum anomalous Hall effect (FQAHE) and exciton dynamics. The abundance of binary compound TMDs, such as MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), has unlocked myriad avenues of exploration. However, the exploration of ternary compound TMDs remains relatively limited, with notable examples being Ta2NiS5 and Ta2NiSe5. In this study, we report the synthesis of a new 2D ternary compound TMD materials, Ta3VSe8, employing the chemical vapor transport (CVT) method. The as-grown bulk crystal is shiny and can be easily exfoliated. The crystal quality and structure are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the surface morphology, stoichiometric ratio, and uniformity are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the phonon property is found stable at different temperatures, magneto-resistivity evolves. These findings provide a possible approach for the realization and exploration of ternary compound TMDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Devices Based on Two-Dimensional Materials: Materials and Fabrication)
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14 pages, 1423 KiB  
Article
Environmental Chamber Characterization of an Ice Detection Sensor for Aviation Using Graphene and PEDOT:PSS
by Dario Farina, Marco Mazio, Hatim Machrafi, Patrick Queeckers and Carlo Saverio Iorio
Micromachines 2024, 15(4), 504; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15040504 - 7 Apr 2024
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Abstract
In the context of improving aircraft safety, this work focuses on creating and testing a graphene-based ice detection system in an environmental chamber. This research is driven by the need for more accurate and efficient ice detection methods, which are crucial in mitigating [...] Read more.
In the context of improving aircraft safety, this work focuses on creating and testing a graphene-based ice detection system in an environmental chamber. This research is driven by the need for more accurate and efficient ice detection methods, which are crucial in mitigating in-flight icing hazards. The methodology employed involves testing flat graphene-based sensors in a controlled environment, simulating a variety of climatic conditions that could be experienced in an aircraft during its entire flight. The environmental chamber enabled precise manipulation of temperature and humidity levels, thereby providing a realistic and comprehensive test bed for sensor performance evaluation. The results were significant, revealing the graphene sensors’ heightened sensitivity and rapid response to the subtle changes in environmental conditions, especially the critical phase transition from water to ice. This sensitivity is the key to detecting ice formation at its onset, a critical requirement for aviation safety. The study concludes that graphene-based sensors tested under varied and controlled atmospheric conditions exhibit a remarkable potential to enhance ice detection systems for aircraft. Their lightweight, efficient, and highly responsive nature makes them a superior alternative to traditional ice detection technologies, paving the way for more advanced and reliable aircraft safety solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Devices Based on Two-Dimensional Materials: Materials and Fabrication)
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