Physiological and Electrochemical Sensors for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology and Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2019) | Viewed by 7907

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Lingang Laboratory, Shanghai 200031, China
Interests: flexible medical sensing systems (implantable and wearable)
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Guest Editor
Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
Interests: bioelectronics; micro/nano devices

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Guest Editor
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798-7356, USA
Interests: MEMS; liquid metals; nanophotonic; bio devices; sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For the past few decades, there have been great progress in physiological and electrochemical sensors for biomedical applications. Many biomedical devices such as deep brain stimulator (DBS), pacemaker, cochlear implants are already in the market and they have been crucial for improving quality of life of patients. There are still great demand for developing newer and better technologies for many other biomedical applications for chronic diseases. To realize smaller, more accurate and highly reliable sensors for wearable and implantable devices, fabrication of miniaturized (typically smaller than millimeters in size) devices utilizing non-traditional techniques like microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technique has been widely studied. In this Special Issue of Micromachines, we highlight the study on both wearable and implantable physiological and electrochemical sensors for biomedical applications, including but not limited to the devices such as:

electroencephalograph (EEG);
electromyography (EMG);
electrocorticogram (EMG);
electrocardiograph (ECG);
neural signal recorder;
sweat sensor;
micro element sensors;
pH sensors;
glucose sensors;
pulse sensors;
neural stimulators;
and retinal prosthesis.

Dr. Ning Xue,
Dr. Chunxiu Liu
Prof. Jeong-Bong Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1604 KiB  
Article
A Capillary-Evaporation Micropump for Real-Time Sweat Rate Monitoring with an Electrochemical Sensor
by Xiao-Ming Chen, Yong-Jiang Li, Dan Han, Hui-Chao Zhu, Chun-Dong Xue, Hsiang-Chen Chui, Tun Cao and Kai-Rong Qin
Micromachines 2019, 10(7), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070457 - 07 Jul 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4269
Abstract
Sweat collection and real time monitoring of sweat rate play essential roles in physiology monitoring and assessment of an athlete’s performance during exercise. In this paper, we report a micropump for sweat simulant collection based on the capillary–evaporation effect. An electrochemical sensor is [...] Read more.
Sweat collection and real time monitoring of sweat rate play essential roles in physiology monitoring and assessment of an athlete’s performance during exercise. In this paper, we report a micropump for sweat simulant collection based on the capillary–evaporation effect. An electrochemical sensor is integrated into the micropump, which monitors the flow rate in real-time by detecting the current using three electrodes. The evaporation rate from micropore array, equivalent to the sweat rate, was theoretically and numerically investigated. The designed micropump yields the maximum collection rate as high as 0.235 μ L/min. In addition, the collection capability of the micropump was validated experimentally; the flow rate through the microchannel was further detected in real-time with the electrochemical sensor. The experimental maximum collection rate showed good consistency with the theoretical data. Our proposed device shows the potential for sweat collection and real-time monitoring of sweat rate, which is a promising candidate for being a wearable platform for real-time physiology and performance monitoring during exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological and Electrochemical Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
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10 pages, 13084 KiB  
Article
Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging System for Biochemical Sensing
by Lulu Zhang, Guijun Miao, Jing Zhang, Luyao Liu, Shisong Gong, Yichen Li, Dafu Cui, Yuanchen Wei, Duli Yu, Xianbo Qiu and Xing Chen
Micromachines 2019, 10(7), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10070442 - 01 Jul 2019
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3085
Abstract
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors are an extremely sensitive optical technique used to detect the changes in refractive index occurring at the sensor interface. Fluorescence involves the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation, and the [...] Read more.
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors are an extremely sensitive optical technique used to detect the changes in refractive index occurring at the sensor interface. Fluorescence involves the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation, and the parameters of the absorbed and emitted radiation are used to identify the presence and the amount of specific molecules in a specimen. SPR biosensors and fluorescence analysis are both effective methods for real-time detection. The combination of these technologies would improve the quantitative detection sensitivity of fluorescence analysis and the specificity of SPR detection. We designed and developed an SPR and fluorescence synchronous detection system. The SPR module was based on two kinds of modulation methods, and the fluorescence module was capable of switching between four wavelengths. The fluorescence microspheres and A549 cells of different concentration were both detected by the SPR and fluorescence method synchronously in real time. The fluorescent signal and the optical signal of the SPR were shown to correlate. The correlation coefficient for fluorescent microspheres detection reached up to 0.9866. The system could be used in cell analysis and molecule diagnosis in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological and Electrochemical Sensors for Biomedical Applications)
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