Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters: From Materials to Devices

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 4238

Special Issue Editors

College of Aerospace Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, 210016, China
Interests: piezoelectric energy harvesting; nonlinear dynamics; mechanical metamaterials; smart materials and structures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Internet of Things Thrust, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Guangzhou), Guangzhou 511453, China
Interests: elastic metamaterials; energy harvesting; vibration suppression; optimization; artificial neural network
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Aerospace Engineering, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ 86301, USA
Interests: smart materials; energy harvesting; structural dynamics; signal processing; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Piezoelectric energy harvesting technology has been a promising solution to realizing the perpetual operation of low-power consumption wireless devices. Recent advances in intelligent materials, nonlinear structures, metamaterials, and electronic interface circuits have promoted the fast development of vibration/acoustic/wind/ocean energy harvesting technology. High-performance intelligent and flexible materials have been synthesized and used to increase energy transduction efficiency. Innovative structures based on nonlinear, self-adaptive mechanisms and metamaterial concepts have been employed to achieve broadband energy harvesting and improve robustness. Meanwhile, various flow-induced vibration phenomena, such as galloping, wake galloping, flutter, and vortex-induced vibration (VIV), have been extensively exploited for small-scale wind/ocean energy harvesting. Moreover, efforts have also been devoted to developing advanced electronic circuits to boost energy harvesting efficiency from the circuit design perspective. This Special Issue aims to collect and present the latest research in this field on a wide range of topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • Metamaterials for energy harvesting and vibration suppression;
  • Flexible/triboelectric materials and biosensors;
  • Nonlinear materials and structures for energy harvesting;
  • Wind/ocean/wave energy harvesting;
  • Advanced energy harvesting circuits;
  • Energy harvesting technology in engineering applications.

Dr. Chunbo Lan
Dr. Huanyu Cheng
Dr. Guobiao Hu
Dr. Yabin Liao
Prof. Dr. Junlei Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • piezoelectric
  • energy harvesting
  • metamaterials
  • flexible materials and biosensors
  • flow energy harvesting
  • nonlinear

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5126 KiB  
Article
A Hybrid Piezoelectric and Electromagnetic Broadband Harvester with Double Cantilever Beams
by Bing Jiang, Fan Zhu, Yi Yang, Jingyu Zhu, Yuting Yang and Ming Yuan
Micromachines 2023, 14(2), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14020240 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1766
Abstract
Vibration-energy harvesting is an effective strategy for replacing batteries and provides a long-term power supply to microelectronic devices. Harvesting vibration energy from human motions has attracted research attention in recent years. Here, a novel low-frequency hybrid piezoelectric and electromagnetic broadband harvester is proposed. [...] Read more.
Vibration-energy harvesting is an effective strategy for replacing batteries and provides a long-term power supply to microelectronic devices. Harvesting vibration energy from human motions has attracted research attention in recent years. Here, a novel low-frequency hybrid piezoelectric and electromagnetic broadband harvester is proposed. Two parallel piezoelectric cantilever beams support the harvester and capture environmental vibration energy based on the piezoelectric effect. A permanent magnet is connected by springs to the two beams, and a fixed coil surrounds the moving permanent magnet, enabling energy conversion via the electromagnetic effect and the proof mass. The parameters influencing the output power of the harvester are optimized numerically to boost the harvester’s performance. The output power of the proposed hybrid harvester is compared with that of a piezoelectric harvester and an electromagnetic harvester. The simulation results show that the output power is significantly higher for the hybrid harvester than for the piezoelectric and electromagnetic harvesters, and the bandwidth is broader owing to the double cantilevers. An experiment is conducted using a prototype of the hybrid harvester to evaluate its output power. The results show multiple resonant peaks, an extended bandwidth, and a maximum power of 6.28 mW. In contrast, the maximum harvested power of the piezoelectric harvester is only 5.15 mW at 9.6 Hz. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters: From Materials to Devices)
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19 pages, 7394 KiB  
Article
Two-Degree-of-Freedom Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Vortex-Induced Vibration
by De Lu, Zhiqing Li, Guobiao Hu, Bo Zhou, Yaowen Yang and Guiyong Zhang
Micromachines 2022, 13(11), 1936; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13111936 - 09 Nov 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1878
Abstract
In recent years, vortex-induced vibration (VIV) has been widely employed to collect small-scale wind energy as a renewable energy source for microelectronics and wireless sensors. In this paper, a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) VIV-based piezoelectric energy harvester (VIVPEH) was designed, and its aerodynamic characteristics were [...] Read more.
In recent years, vortex-induced vibration (VIV) has been widely employed to collect small-scale wind energy as a renewable energy source for microelectronics and wireless sensors. In this paper, a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) VIV-based piezoelectric energy harvester (VIVPEH) was designed, and its aerodynamic characteristics were thoroughly investigated. First, based on the traditional model theory and combined with the knowledge of vibration dynamics, the governing equations of the 2DOF VIVPEH were established. The dynamic responses, including the displacement and voltage output, were numerically simulated. Compared with the traditional 1DOF VIVPEH, the 2DOF VIVPEH proposed in this paper produced two lock-in regions for broadband wind energy harvesting. Furthermore, it was unveiled that the first- and second-order resonances were induced in the first and lock-in regions, respectively. Subsequently, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the influences of the circuit and mechanical parameters on the energy harvesting performance of the 2DOF VIVPEH. It was found that when the 2DOF VIVPEH was induced to vibrate in different lock-in regions, its optimal resistance became different. Moreover, by varying the masses and stiffnesses of the primary and secondary DOFs, we could adjust the lock-in regions in terms of their bandwidths, locations, and amplitudes, which provides a possibility for further customization and optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Energy Harvesters: From Materials to Devices)
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