Nanoparticles for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B3: Nanoparticles in Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 3317

Special Issue Editor

College of Engineering and Science-Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272, USA
Interests: nanoparticles; functionalization; nanomedicine; diagnosis; therapeutics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The use of nanoparticles in biomedical studies has resulted in several promising applications under the field of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology is the science and technology of diagnosing, treating, and preventing disease and traumatic injury, of relieving pain, and of preserving and improving human health, using molecular tools and molecular knowledge of the human body. Benefits in the use of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery and diagnosis have been realized, examples include improved drug circulation times, enhanced intratumorally retention, and enhanced therapeutic efficacy. The nanomedicine field is not limited to applications in drug therapy but can also be instrumental in diagnosing and monitoring diseases. This Special Issue on “Nanoparticles for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications” can provide a wide collection of recent research on nanoparticles as agent carriers, diagnosis, therapeutics, and microfluidic-based applications.

Dr. Scott Poh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery systems
  • anti-inflammatory therapeutics and diagnosis
  • cancer therapeutics and diagnosis
  • antimicrobial therapies and biofilm modulation
  • targeting nanoparticles
  • tissue healing and regeneration
  • microfluidic applications
  • other advanced bioapplications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4040 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Characterization of a Nano-Inclusion Complex of Quercetin with β-Cyclodextrin and Its Potential Activity on Cancer Cells
by Rajaram Rajamohan, Sekar Ashokkumar, Kuppusamy Murugavel and Yong Rok Lee
Micromachines 2023, 14(7), 1352; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14071352 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1730
Abstract
Quercetin (QRC), a flavonoid found in foods and plants such as red wine, onions, green tea, apples, and berries, possesses remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. These properties make it effective in combating cancer cells, reducing inflammation, protecting against heart disease, and regulating blood [...] Read more.
Quercetin (QRC), a flavonoid found in foods and plants such as red wine, onions, green tea, apples, and berries, possesses remarkable anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. These properties make it effective in combating cancer cells, reducing inflammation, protecting against heart disease, and regulating blood sugar levels. To enhance the potential of inclusion complexes (ICs) containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in cancer therapy, they were transformed into nano-inclusion complexes (NICs). In this research, NICs were synthesized using ethanol as a reducing agent in the nanoprecipitation process. By employing FT-IR analysis, it was observed that hydrogen bonds were formed between QRC and β-CD. Moreover, the IC molecules formed NICs through the aggregation facilitated by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Proton NMR results further confirmed the occurrence of proton shielding and deshielding subsequent to the formation of NICs. The introduction of β-CDs led to the development of a distinctive feather-like structure within the NICs. The particle sizes were consistently measured around 200 nm, and both SAED and XRD patterns indicated the absence of crystalline NICs, providing supporting evidence. Through cytotoxicity and fluorescence-assisted cell-sorting analysis, the synthesized NICs showed no significant damage in the cell line of MCF-7. In comparison to QRC alone, the presence of high concentrations of NICs exhibited a lesser degree of toxicity in normal human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. Moreover, the individual and combined administration of both low and high concentrations of NICs effectively suppressed the growth of cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The solubility improvement resulting from the formation of QRC-NICs with β-CD enhanced the percentage of cell survival for MCF-7 cell types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications)
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12 pages, 1620 KiB  
Article
Depth Dose Enhancement in Orthovoltage Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Phantom Study
by James C. L. Chow and Sama Jubran
Micromachines 2023, 14(6), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14061230 - 10 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1232
Abstract
Background: This study was to examine the depth dose enhancement in orthovoltage nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy for skin treatment by investigating the impact of various photon beam energies, nanoparticle materials, and nanoparticle concentrations. Methods: A water phantom was utilized, and different nanoparticle materials (gold, platinum, [...] Read more.
Background: This study was to examine the depth dose enhancement in orthovoltage nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy for skin treatment by investigating the impact of various photon beam energies, nanoparticle materials, and nanoparticle concentrations. Methods: A water phantom was utilized, and different nanoparticle materials (gold, platinum, iodine, silver, iron oxide) were added to determine the depth doses through Monte Carlo simulation. The clinical 105 kVp and 220 kVp photon beams were used to compute the depth doses of the phantom at different nanoparticle concentrations (ranging from 3 mg/mL to 40 mg/mL). The dose enhancement ratio (DER), which represents the ratio of the dose with nanoparticles to the dose without nanoparticles at the same depth in the phantom, was calculated to determine the dose enhancement. Results: The study found that gold nanoparticles outperformed the other nanoparticle materials, with a maximum DER value of 3.77 at a concentration of 40 mg/mL. Iron oxide nanoparticles exhibited the lowest DER value, equal to 1, when compared to other nanoparticles. Additionally, the DER value increased with higher nanoparticle concentrations and lower photon beam energy. Conclusions: It is concluded in this study that gold nanoparticles are the most effective in enhancing the depth dose in orthovoltage nanoparticle-enhanced skin therapy. Furthermore, the results suggest that increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreasing photon beam energy lead to increased dose enhancement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications)
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