Perspective in Natural Gas Hydrate

A special issue of Methane (ISSN 2674-0389).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4563

Special Issue Editors

Key Laboratory of Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510641, China
Interests: fundamental research of gas hydrate; heat and mass transfer in porous media; energy recovery from methane hydrate reservoir; natural gas hydrate exploitation technology; thermodynamic optimization for hydrate dissociation
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Guest Editor
Institute of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: natural gas hydrate development; eco-environmental effect; marine energy system; sustainable energy strategy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the development of worldwide energy consumption and the shifting of energy consumption structure, the energy crisis has become increasingly prominent, and the development and applications of new energy sources have received more attention. Natural gas hydrate (NGH) is a solid ice-like substance composed of water and gas molecules (e.g., methane). As a clean energy resource with huge exploitation potential, NGH has generated considerable research interest.

Methane hydrate deposits hold immense volumes of methane, primarily stored in sediments of the Earth’s outer continental margins and polar regions. The total amount of carbon stored in these deposits amounts to many thousands of gigatons and, in fact, far exceeds the quantity of carbon that currently resides in the atmosphere. Clearly, methane hydrate has an important role in our planet’s global carbon cycle, primarily as a carbon storage reservoir.

This Special Issue aims to be a forum for the presentation of new and improved research of natural gas hydrate. In particular, the analysis and interpretation for developing a comprehensive understanding of the resource potential of methane hydrates and the role that hydrates may play in climate change fall within the scope of this Special Issue.

Dr. Yi Wang
Prof. Dr. Jing-Chun Feng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Methane is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural gas hydrate
  • global carbon cycle
  • gas production from hydrate
  • gas Hydrate dissociation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 1586 KiB  
Communication
Effect of Pressure on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Methane during Methane Hydrate Formation at Temperatures Below the Freezing Point of Water
by Akihiro Hachikubo, Taichi Nezu, Kaede Takizawa and Satoshi Takeya
Methane 2023, 2(2), 129-136; https://doi.org/10.3390/methane2020010 - 12 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1147
Abstract
Isotopic fractionation of methane between gas and solid hydrate phases provides data regarding hydrate-forming environments, but the effect of pressure on isotopic fractionation is not well understood. In this study, methane hydrates were synthesized in a pressure cell, and the hydrogen isotope compositions [...] Read more.
Isotopic fractionation of methane between gas and solid hydrate phases provides data regarding hydrate-forming environments, but the effect of pressure on isotopic fractionation is not well understood. In this study, methane hydrates were synthesized in a pressure cell, and the hydrogen isotope compositions of the residual and hydrate-bound gases were determined. The δ2H of hydrate-bound methane formed below the freezing point of water was 5.7–10.3‰ lower than that of residual methane, indicating that methane hydrate generally encapsulates lighter molecules (CH4) instead of CH32H. The fractionation factors αH-V of the gas and hydrate phases were in the range 0.9881–0.9932 at a temperature and pressure of 223.3–268.2 K and 1.7–19.5 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, αH-V increased with increasing formation pressure, suggesting that the difference in the hydrogen isotopes of the hydrate-bound methane and surrounding methane yields data regarding the formation pressure. Although the differences in the hydrogen isotopes observed in this study are insignificant, precise analyses of the isotopes of natural hydrates in the same area enable the determination of the pressure during hydrate formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspective in Natural Gas Hydrate)
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9 pages, 1640 KiB  
Article
Efficient Storage of Methane in Hydrate Form Using Soybean Powder
by Rama Rao Ganteda, Sai Kiran Burla, Jagan Mohan Reddy Boggu and Pinnelli S. R. Prasad
Methane 2022, 1(3), 201-209; https://doi.org/10.3390/methane1030016 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
Natural gas is a promising future source for the increasing energy demand. It is partially clean energy with fewer environmental impacts, and it is necessary to develop technologies to cater to the supply chain. Due to their inherent structural properties, gas hydrates or [...] Read more.
Natural gas is a promising future source for the increasing energy demand. It is partially clean energy with fewer environmental impacts, and it is necessary to develop technologies to cater to the supply chain. Due to their inherent structural properties, gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates are promising materials for capturing and storing methane gas. In the present study, the experimental investigations were performed to assess the utilization of soybean powder (SBP) as a promoting additive compared to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) for methane hydrate formation. The methane hydrate formation temperature and pressure with SBP are 277.8 ± 3.2 K, 7050.9 ± 76.2 kPa, similar to SDS 277.2 ± 0.3 K, 7446.3 ± 5.7 kPa in the non-stirred system. The gas uptake capacity is about 94.2 ± 4.5 v/v and 92.4 ± 4.6 v/v with SBP and SDS, which is ~60% of the practical, achievable limit. The time for the 90% of hydrate conversion is ~4.6 times higher for SBP than SDS. The more prolonged kinetics is ascribed to the complex constituents in the SBP. In contrast to the SDS solution, no foam was produced in the sample of the SBP solution. The current studies demonstrate that SBP can be utilized to develop cleaner and more effective promoters for methane hydrate formation without foam creation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspective in Natural Gas Hydrate)
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Review

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15 pages, 3082 KiB  
Review
Review of Biosurfactants Gas Hydrate Promoters
by Cornelius B. Bavoh, Eric Broni-Bediako and Solomon Adjei Marfo
Methane 2023, 2(3), 304-318; https://doi.org/10.3390/methane2030020 - 08 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Biosurfactants are promising additives for gas hydrate technology applications. They are believed to have better eco properties than conventional kinetic hydrate promoters such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In this article, the research advances on the use of biosurfactants for gas hydrate formation [...] Read more.
Biosurfactants are promising additives for gas hydrate technology applications. They are believed to have better eco properties than conventional kinetic hydrate promoters such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In this article, the research advances on the use of biosurfactants for gas hydrate formation enhancement have been reviewed and discussed in detail to provide current knowledge on their progress in green chemistry technologies. Specifically, the use of bio promoters in carbon capture, gas storage and transportation are discussed. By far, biosurfactants seem to perform better than conventional hydrate promoters and have the potential to lead to the commercialization of gas hydrate-based technologies in terms of improving hydrate kinetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perspective in Natural Gas Hydrate)
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