Recycled Constituent Composites

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 7227

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School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Supmeca-Paris, 3 rue Fernand Hainaut, 93400 Saint Ouen, France
Interests: advanced manufacturing processes (sinter forging, thixoforming); damage mechanisms of materials (metallic, intermetallic, rubber and epoxy-based composites); design of new composites and damage characterization; design and manufacturing of recycled constituent composites
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will cover “Novel Composites from Recycled Materials”, and includes processing and characterization of composites manufactured from recycled materials. These composites exhibit a light weight and high strength, while having a low manufacturing cost. Industry has seen an increasing demand for high performance, low cost materials, as well as energy-saving production techniques.

As engineers, we are challenged to design with confidence for long-term performance applications. Many composites manufactured from recycled materials, such as huge scrap metallic (steel, aluminum, bronze, etc.) chips, offer the light weight, strength and durability needed for aircraft and automotive applications

Currently, these composites often are made up of different pure and/or alloys, reinforced with ground scrap materials, producing tough, corrosion-resistant parts. For example, machining chips are being used very frequently as the metal matrix for high performance, high quality composites through sintering, casting, thixoforming, hot extrusion, etc. Furthermore, many different types of recycled materials, such as glass and carbon fibers, are also being used as extreme reinforcement fillers in recycled metallic materials, to improve the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties for certain applications.

With these ideas in mind, we will collect different scientific reports, reviews, full research papers, technical papers, and experimental and numerical works under this Special Issue of Metals.

Prof. Dr. Emin Bayraktar
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Cost Novel Composites
  • Recycled Materials
  • Scrap Metallic Chips
  • Sintering
  • Casting
  • Energy Saving
  • Mechanical – Physical Characterization
  • Static-Dynamic Solicitations
  • Corrosion
  • Micro-Nano indentations
  • Tribological Tests

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2819 KiB  
Article
Recycling Chips of Stainless Steel Using a Full Factorial Design
by Claudiney Mendonça, Patricia Capellato, Emin Bayraktar, Fábio Gatamorta, José Gomes, Adhimar Oliveira, Daniela Sachs, Mirian Melo and Gilbert Silva
Metals 2019, 9(8), 842; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9080842 - 30 Jul 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3814
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide an experimental investigation on the novel method for recycling chips of duplex stainless steel, with the addition of vanadium carbide, in order to produce metal/carbide composites from a high-energy mechanical milling process. Powders of duplex [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to provide an experimental investigation on the novel method for recycling chips of duplex stainless steel, with the addition of vanadium carbide, in order to produce metal/carbide composites from a high-energy mechanical milling process. Powders of duplex stainless steel with the addition of vanadium carbide were prepared by high-energy mechanical ball milling utilizing a planetary ball mill. For this proposal, experiments following a full factorial design with two replicates were planned, performed, and then analyzed. The four factors investigated in this study were rotation speed, milling time, powder to ball weight ratio and carbide percentage. For each factor, the experiments were conducted into two levels so that the internal behavior among them could be statistically estimated: 250 to 350 rpm for rotation speed, 10 to 50 h for milling time, 10:1 to 22:1 for powder to ball weight ratio, and 0 to 3% carbide percentage. In order to measure and characterize particle size, we utilized the analysis of particle size and a scanning electron microscopy. The results showed with the addition of carbide in the milling process cause an average of reduction in particle size when compared with the material without carbide added. All the four factors investigated in this study presented significant influence on the milling process of duplex stainless steel chips and the reduction of particle size. The statistical analysis showed that the addition of carbide in the process is the most influential factor, followed by the milling time, rotation speed and powder to ball weight ratio. Significant interaction effects among these factors were also identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Constituent Composites )
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13 pages, 4174 KiB  
Article
Recovery of Soluble Potassium from Alunite by Thermal Decomposition: Effect of CaO and Phase Transformation
by Yiwei Zhong, Xinle Qiu, Jintao Gao, Long Meng and Zhancheng Guo
Metals 2019, 9(3), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030337 - 16 Mar 2019
Viewed by 2912
Abstract
As mining waste, alunite is a potential resource to produce potassium salt. The decomposition of alunite is closely associated with the recovery of soluble potassium. In this study, the effect of CaO on phase transformation of alunite in the desulfation stage was examined. [...] Read more.
As mining waste, alunite is a potential resource to produce potassium salt. The decomposition of alunite is closely associated with the recovery of soluble potassium. In this study, the effect of CaO on phase transformation of alunite in the desulfation stage was examined. The results showed that CaO was beneficial to the desulfation of alunite. The decomposition temperature to obtain soluble potassium salt (K2SO4) was reduced from 800 °C to 700 °C by adding CaO. When the mass ratio of CaO/alunite was 0.1, 81% of soluble potassium was extracted by water leaching after calcination at 700 °C for 2 h. The mechanism of CaO to promote the disintegration of alunite was proposed through analyzing the phase transformation sequences. Alkaline Ca ion was inclined to bond with acidic [SO4] groups, and thus the breakage of S–O linkages between [AlO6] octahedron and [SO4] tetrahedron were improved. Monomer [SO4] tetrahedrons were released to form K2SO4 at a lower decomposition temperature. With the increase of the amount of CaO, the excess CaO bonded with neutral Al. [AlO6] tetrahedrons in alunite transformed into [AlO4] octahedrons due to the breakage of the Al–O network. Al3+ was dissociated and bonded with [SO4] tetrahedron to form soluble Al salts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled Constituent Composites )
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