Physical Metallurgy of Steel

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2455

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
Interests: physical metallurgy; advanced steel materials; microstructure analysis

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: carbon management and precipitation of ultrahigh-strength steels; heat-resistant high-strength aluminium alloy

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Guest Editor
National Engineering Research Center of Near-Net-Shape Forming for Metallic Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
Interests: physical metallurgy; advanced steel materials; microstructure characterization; precipitation; thermo-mechanical processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical metallurgy is the root of the vigorous development of modern materials science. The physical metallurgy of steel is an important part of ironmaking and steelmaking. The main research scope of this Special Issue is the microstructure evolution and properties changes during processing and heat treatment after the solidification of chemical metallurgy products. The main physical metallurgy problem in steel production is the relationship between process, microstructure and properties. The in-depth study of microstructure reveals the mechanisms behind various appearances, and promotes the progress of process technology and the development of advanced materials.

Prof. Dr. Xiangdong Huo
Dr. Zhengwu Peng
Dr. Songjun Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • physical metallurgy
  • process parameters
  • microstructure evolution
  • mechanical properties
  • TMCP
  • recrystallization
  • transformation
  • precipitation
  • steel grade

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 12168 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Hot Deformation Behavior and Processing Maps Based on Murty Criterion of SAE8620RH Gear Steel
by Songjun Chen, Liejun Li and Ruxue Zhu
Metals 2023, 13(11), 1832; https://doi.org/10.3390/met13111832 - 31 Oct 2023
Viewed by 930
Abstract
The hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of the SAE8620RH gear steel were investigated through a single-pass hot compression test at deformation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C and strain rates between 0.02 and 8.0 s−1 by 60% reduction. A novel strain [...] Read more.
The hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of the SAE8620RH gear steel were investigated through a single-pass hot compression test at deformation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C and strain rates between 0.02 and 8.0 s−1 by 60% reduction. A novel strain compensation constitutive model was developed, and the 2D processing maps were established by Murty’s criterion. Results showed that the relationship between material-related parameters and strain can be mathematically expressed by a highly reliable 8th-order polynomial. The constructed strain compensation constitutive model demonstrated remarkable predictive precision, as evidenced by the correlation coefficient (R) and the absolute values of average relative error (AARE) of 0.978 and 4%, respectively. The flow instability domains considerably expanded towards the high deformation temperature region as the strain increased. Microstructure analysis confirmed the accuracy of the processing map constructed by Murty’s criterion. The most noticeable optimum processing windows for SAE8620RH gear steel at a strain of 0.7 occurred within the temperature range of 1000–1100 °C and the strain rate range of 0.3–1.0 s−1, due to high η values exceeding 0.3 and equiaxial dynamic recrystallization microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Metallurgy of Steel)
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19 pages, 6764 KiB  
Article
Relationship of Internal Stress Fields with Self-Organization Processes in Hadfield Steel under Tensile Load
by Natalyi Popova, Mikhail Slobodyan, Anatoliy Klopotov, Elena Nikonenko, Alexander Potekaev and Vladislav Borodin
Metals 2023, 13(5), 952; https://doi.org/10.3390/met13050952 - 14 May 2023
Viewed by 1124
Abstract
The effect of tensile strains on the microstructure of Hadfield steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Stages of the obtained stress–strain curves were observed, and correlated well with the evolution of the dislocation substructure. Based on an analysis of TEM images, [...] Read more.
The effect of tensile strains on the microstructure of Hadfield steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Stages of the obtained stress–strain curves were observed, and correlated well with the evolution of the dislocation substructure. Based on an analysis of TEM images, quantitative parameters were determined, such as the material volume fractions, in which slip and twinning occurred, as well as twinning, which developed in one, two and three systems. Some transformation mechanisms were reported that caused great hardening of Hadfield steel. In particular, a complex defect substructure formed in a self-organized manner due to the formation of cells, the dislocations retarded by their walls, as well as the deceleration of dislocations on twins and, vice versa, of twins on dislocations. These factors affected both the average and excess local density of dislocations. Additionally, they resulted in elastic stress fields, which manifested themselves in the curvature–torsion gradient of the crystal lattice. A high level of stresses caused by solid-solution strengthening prevented the relaxation of elastic ones, contributing to the strain hardening of the Hadfield steel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Metallurgy of Steel)
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