Characterization and Modeling on Complex Metallic Materials

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Applications of Metallic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1385

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science & Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, 066004, China
Interests: complex metallic materials; multiscale calculations; characterization; microstructure; crystal structure; physical properties; defects; innovation

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science & Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, 066004, China
Interests: complex metallic materials; multiscale calculations; characterization; microstructure; crystal structure; physical properties; defects; innovation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Complex metallic materials (CMMs), such as multi-principal element alloys, metallic quasicrystals/modulated structures/composite structures, metallic glasses, host–guest structures, etc., have gained significant attention and are at the cutting edge of scientific research and industrial development activities. Diverse leading techniques like aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), synchrotron radiation diffraction and tomography, 2D and 3D electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, etc., as well as multiscale numerical simulation approaches including density-function theory, molecular dynamic simulation, and finite element analysis have been utilized to characterize the atomic-level crystal structure and microstructure peculiarities, with the purpose of understanding and tailoring the properties of the studied system.

Most scientific and industrial research work requires the coordination of multidisciplinary research fields. Therefore, the present topic offers a framework for integrating interdisciplinary branches in order to bring together experimental and theoretical contributions in a wide variety of fields, with topics of interest covering, but not limited to:

General topics:

  • Multiscale calculations on CMM design and properties prediction;
  • Phase transformation;
  • Characterization of microstructure;
  • Characterization of crystal structure;
  • Plasticity, fatigue, fracture, and corrosion resistance physical properties;
  • Vacancy, dislocation, and twin defects;
  • Innovation hardware and software.

Prof. Dr. Bin Wen
Prof. Dr. Changzeng Fan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • complex metallic materials
  • multiscale calculations
  • characterization
  • microstructure
  • crystal structure
  • physical properties
  • defects
  • innovation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 3012 KiB  
Article
Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Residual Stresses for Ferritic Steel Specimens over 80 mm Thick
by Vyacheslav Em, Karpov Ivan, Wanchuck Woo and Pavol Mikula
Metals 2024, 14(6), 638; https://doi.org/10.3390/met14060638 - 28 May 2024
Viewed by 342
Abstract
The maximum thickness for ferritic steel specimens’ residual stress measurements using neutron diffraction is known to be about 80 mm. This paper proposes a new neutron diffraction configuration of residual stress measurements for cases that are over 80 mm thick. The configuration utilizes [...] Read more.
The maximum thickness for ferritic steel specimens’ residual stress measurements using neutron diffraction is known to be about 80 mm. This paper proposes a new neutron diffraction configuration of residual stress measurements for cases that are over 80 mm thick. The configuration utilizes a neutron beam with a wavelength of 1.55 Å diffracted from the (220) plane with a diffraction angle (2θ) of 99.4°. The reason for the deep penetration capability is attributed to the chosen wavelength having enough intensities due to the low cross-section near the Bragg edge and the reduced beam path length (~16 mm) reflected by the large diffraction angle. Neutron diffraction experiments with this configuration can decrease strain errors up to ±150 με, corresponding to a stress of about ±30 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Modeling on Complex Metallic Materials)
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17 pages, 5907 KiB  
Article
Orientation Relationship of Intergrowth Al2Fe and Al5Fe2 Intermetallics Determined by Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction
by Yibo Liu, Changzeng Fan, Bin Wen, Zhefeng Xu, Ruidong Fu and Lifeng Zhang
Metals 2024, 14(3), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/met14030337 - 15 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 809
Abstract
Although the Al2Fe phase has similar decagonal-like atomic arrangements as that of the orthorhombic Al5Fe2 phase, no evidence for intergrowth samples of Al2Fe and Al5Fe2 has been reported. In the present work, the [...] Read more.
Although the Al2Fe phase has similar decagonal-like atomic arrangements as that of the orthorhombic Al5Fe2 phase, no evidence for intergrowth samples of Al2Fe and Al5Fe2 has been reported. In the present work, the co-existence of Al2Fe and Al5Fe2 phases has been discovered from the educts obtained with a nominal atomic ratio of Al:Fe of 2:1 by arc melting. First, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements have been utilized to determine the exact crystal structures of both phases, which are refined to be Al12.48Fe6.52 and Al5.72Fe2, respectively. Second, the orientation relationship between Al2Fe and Al5Fe2 has been directly deduced from the SXRD data sets, and the co-existence structure model has been constructed. Finally, four pairs of parallel atomic planes and their unique orientation relations have been determined from the reconstructed reciprocal-space precession images of (0kl), (h0l), and (hk0) layers. In addition, one kind of interface atomic structure model is constructed by the orientation relations between two phases, correspondingly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization and Modeling on Complex Metallic Materials)
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