Metabolomic Approaches Combined with Statistical Methods as Cancer Diagnostic Tools

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Metabolomic Profiling Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020) | Viewed by 6023

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CQM - Centro de Química da Madeira, University of Madeira, 9000-082 Funchal, Portugal
Interests: analytical methods; metabolomics; cancer biomarkers; diagnosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Up to date, cancer remains one of the leading causes of death in the world after coronary diseases. Currently, the available diagnostic tools have supported in the detection leading to the improved survival rates. In this regard, metabolomics (e.g., proteomic, lipidomic) studies emerged as powerful approaches to study the metabolic changes in several diseases including cancer involving a comprehensive analysis of all metabolites present in biological systems. Moreover, metabolomics play an important role in disease profiling being a promising approach for the pursuit of new biomarkers in biological matrices, such as cell extracts, tissues or biological fluids. As a fast-growing field that focus on the investigation of metabolites present in biological systems it reflects the altered metabolism and the physiological status. This opens the possibility of integration of several analytical platforms for multi-omics approach with the aim of a more comprehensive analysis of biological samples. The generated data is then processed through statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis, partial least square-discriminate analysis) in order to decipher the information obtained and discover potential biomarkers underlying dysregulated cancer pathways.

This Special Issue is focused on the development of analytical tools and application of statistical methods to analyze metabolomics data. We invite researchers to submit their manuscripts outlining metabolomic studies and data analysis methods. Nevertheless, the scope of this Special Issue is not limited to this topic, including also experimental design, data acquisition methods, and applied metabolomics studies.

Dr. Catarina Luís Silva
Dr. Rosa Perestrelo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Cancer pathways
  • Volatomic
  • Proteomic
  • Lipidomic
  • Multivariate statistical tools
  • Analytical tools
  • Integration of analytical platforms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 716 KiB  
Article
Volatilomics Reveals Potential Biomarkers for Identification of Renal Cell Carcinoma: An In Vitro Approach
by Filipa Amaro, Joana Pinto, Sílvia Rocha, Ana Margarida Araújo, Vera Miranda-Gonçalves, Carmen Jerónimo, Rui Henrique, Maria de Lourdes Bastos, Márcia Carvalho and Paula Guedes de Pinho
Metabolites 2020, 10(5), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10050174 - 27 Apr 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3162
Abstract
The identification of noninvasive biomarkers able to detect renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at an early stage remains an unmet clinical need. The recognition that altered metabolism is a core hallmark of cancer boosted metabolomic studies focused in the search for cancer biomarkers. The [...] Read more.
The identification of noninvasive biomarkers able to detect renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at an early stage remains an unmet clinical need. The recognition that altered metabolism is a core hallmark of cancer boosted metabolomic studies focused in the search for cancer biomarkers. The present work aims to evaluate the performance of the volatile metabolites present in the extracellular medium to discriminate RCC cell lines with distinct histological subtypes (clear cell and papillary) and metastatic potential from non-tumorigenic renal cells. Hence, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and volatile carbonyl compounds (VCCs) were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Multivariate and univariate analysis unveiled a panel of metabolites responsible for the separation between groups, mostly belonging to ketones, alcohols, alkanes and aldehydes classes. Some metabolites were found similarly altered for all RCC cell lines compared to non-tumorigenic cells, namely 2-ethylhexanol, tetradecane, formaldehyde, acetone (increased) and cyclohexanone and acetaldehyde (decreased). Furthermore, significantly altered levels of cyclohexanol, decanal, decane, dodecane and 4-methylbenzaldehyde were observed in all metastatic RCC cell lines when compared with the non-metastatic ones. Moreover, some alterations in the volatile composition were also observed between RCC histological subtypes. Overall, our results demonstrate the potential of volatile profiling for identification of noninvasive candidate biomarkers for early RCC diagnosis. Full article
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Review

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20 pages, 996 KiB  
Review
Analytical Platforms for the Determination of Phospholipid Turnover in Breast Cancer Tissue: Role of Phospholipase Activity in Breast Cancer Development
by Rosa Perestrelo, Marijana Petkovic and Catarina Luís Silva
Metabolites 2021, 11(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11010032 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2255
Abstract
Altered lipid metabolism has been associated with the progression of various cancers, and aberrant expression of enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism has been detected in different stages of cancer. Breast cancer (BC) is one of the cancer types known to be associated [...] Read more.
Altered lipid metabolism has been associated with the progression of various cancers, and aberrant expression of enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism has been detected in different stages of cancer. Breast cancer (BC) is one of the cancer types known to be associated with alterations in the lipid metabolism and overexpression of enzymes involved in this metabolism. It has been demonstrated that inhibition of the activity of certain enzymes, such as that of phospholipase A2 in BC cell lines sensitizes these cells and decreases the IC50 values for forthcoming therapy with traditional drugs, such as doxorubicin and tamoxifen. Moreover, other phospholipases, such as phospholipase C and D, are involved in intracellular signal transduction, which emphasizes their importance in cancer development. Finally, BC is assumed to be dependent on the diet and the composition of lipids in nutrients. Despite their importance, analytical approaches that can associate the activity of phospholipases with changes in the lipid composition and distribution in cancer tissues are not yet standardized. In this review, an overview of various analytical platforms that are applied on the study of lipids and phospholipase activity in BC tissues will be given, as well as their association with cancer diagnosis and tumor progression. The methods that are applied to tissues obtained from the BC patients will be emphasized and critically evaluated, regarding their applicability in oncology. Full article
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