Endocrinology, Pediatric Diabetes, and Metabolism

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology and Clinical Metabolic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 6288

Special Issue Editor

1. Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2. Department of Pediatrics, Buzzi Children’s Hospital, 20157 Milano, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; pediatric endocrinology; obesity; metabolic syndrome; telemedicine; digital health; exercise; disability; preventive medicine; translational research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hormones play a central role in child growth and development. Dysfunctions in growth, puberty, and sexual development, diabetes, thyroid disorders, and childhood obesity represent the most common endocrinological problems that may occur in children and adolescents.

This Special Issue “Endocrinology, Pediatric Diabetes, and Metabolism” aims to publish original research articles, reviews, clinical studies, case reports, and editorials covering important clinical, translational, and basic research in pediatric endocrinology, diabetes, and the metabolic aspects of endocrinological diseases.

Dr. Valeria Calcaterra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pediatric endocrinology
  • Diabetes
  • Childhood obesity
  • Thyroid
  • Puberty
  • Adrenal gland
  • Gonads
  • Metabolism
  • Translational research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

4 pages, 187 KiB  
Editorial
Maternal or Paternal Diabetes and Its Crucial Role in Offspring Birth Weight and MODY Diagnosis
Metabolites 2020, 10(10), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10100387 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1440
Abstract
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) represents a heterogenous group of monogenic autosomal dominant diseases, which accounts for 1–2% of all diabetes cases. Pregnancy represents a crucial time to diagnose MODY forms due to the 50% risk of inheritance in offspring of affected [...] Read more.
Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) represents a heterogenous group of monogenic autosomal dominant diseases, which accounts for 1–2% of all diabetes cases. Pregnancy represents a crucial time to diagnose MODY forms due to the 50% risk of inheritance in offspring of affected subjects and the potential implications on adequate fetal weight. Not only a history of maternal diabetes may affect the birth weight of offspring, paternal diabetes should also be taken into consideration for a correct pathogenetic diagnosis. The crucial role of maternal and paternal diabetes inheritance patterns and the impact of this inherited mutation on birthweight and the MODY diagnosis was discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrinology, Pediatric Diabetes, and Metabolism)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

9 pages, 574 KiB  
Article
Continuous Glucose and Heart Rate Monitoring in Young People with Type 1 Diabetes: An Exploratory Study about Perspectives in Nocturnal Hypoglycemia Detection
Metabolites 2021, 11(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11010005 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
A combination of information from blood glucose (BG) and heart rate (HR) measurements has been proposed to investigate the HR changes related to nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) episodes in pediatric subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D), examining whether they could improve hypoglycemia prediction. We [...] Read more.
A combination of information from blood glucose (BG) and heart rate (HR) measurements has been proposed to investigate the HR changes related to nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) episodes in pediatric subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D), examining whether they could improve hypoglycemia prediction. We enrolled seventeen children and adolescents with T1D, monitored on average for 194 days. BG was detected by flash glucose monitoring devices, and HR was measured by wrist-worn fitness trackers. For each subject, we compared HR values recorded in the hour before NH episodes (before-hypoglycemia) with HR values recorded during sleep intervals without hypoglycemia (no-hypoglycemia). Furthermore, we investigated the behavior after the end of NH. Nine participants (53%) experienced at least three NH. Among these nine subjects, six (67%) showed a statistically significant difference between the before-hypoglycemia HR distribution and the no-hypoglycemia HR distribution. In all these six cases, the before-hypoglycemia HR median value was higher than the no-hypoglycemia HR median value. In almost all cases, HR values after the end of hypoglycemia remained higher compared to no-hypoglycemia sleep intervals. This exploratory study support that HR modifications occur during NH in T1D subjects. The identification of specific HR patterns can be helpful to improve NH detection and prevent fatal events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrinology, Pediatric Diabetes, and Metabolism)
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Review

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16 pages, 650 KiB  
Review
The Diabetic Lung: Insights into Pulmonary Changes in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes
Metabolites 2021, 11(2), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11020069 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2369
Abstract
Historically, the lung was not listed and recognized as a major target organ of diabetic injury. The first evidence of diabetic lung involvement was published fifty years ago, with a study conducted in a population of young adults affected by type 1 diabetes [...] Read more.
Historically, the lung was not listed and recognized as a major target organ of diabetic injury. The first evidence of diabetic lung involvement was published fifty years ago, with a study conducted in a population of young adults affected by type 1 diabetes (T1D). In recent years, there has been mounting evidence showing that the lung is a target organ of diabetic injury since the beginning of the disease—at the pediatric age. The deeply branched vascularization of the lungs and the abundance of connective tissue, indeed, make them vulnerable to the effects of hyperglycemia, in a way similar to other organs affected by microvascular complications. In this review, we focus on pulmonary function impairment in children and adolescents affected by T1D. We also cover controversial aspects regarding available studies and future perspectives in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endocrinology, Pediatric Diabetes, and Metabolism)
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