Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Metabolomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2023) | Viewed by 10047

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Protein Biochemistry, Center for Innovation in Mass Spectrometry, UNIRIO, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Interests: food Science;proteomics; metabolomics; biomaterials

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-909, RJ, Brazil
Interests: proteomics; plant proteomics; mass spectrometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit an original research or review article to the Special Issue entitled “Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants”.

Food plants are considered one of the most complex matrices in nature due to their richness in phytochemicals, especially secondary metabolites, and nutrients such as proteins. The development and advancement of omics technology allow the comprehensive characterization of these compounds by providing their chemical fingerprint and functional biomarkers. These data can support important decisions to obtain, extract and apply compounds of biotechnological interest. 

This Special Issue is dedicated to metabolomics and proteomics studies that investigate food plants based on chromatography and mass spectrometry techniques, especially LC-MS/MS, but not exclusively. The topics of this Special Issue include: untargeted and targeted analysis of bioactive compounds, proteins and peptides of food plants; metabolomics data processing and identification/annotation of phenolic compounds; food plant imaging; bioaccessibility/bioavailability of secondary metabolites and protein digestibility assessed by omics tools; and metabolomic and proteomic applications in food plant quality control, process engineering and nutrition.

Advances in data processing and annotation of food plant metabolites, the application of proteomics in studying allergenicity and developing certified reference material and the impact of food processing metabolites and protein profiles are also of interest. Manuscripts that propose other innovations or challenging issues that may push the boundaries of food metabolomics and proteomics are also highly desired.

Prof. Dr. Mariana Simões Larraz Ferreira
Prof. Dr. Jesús Lozano-Sánchez
Dr. Fábio César Sousa Nogueira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allergen-targeted proteomics
  • foodomics
  • ion mobility
  • mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics
  • mass-spectrometry-based proteomics
  • phenolic compound profiling

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2081 KiB  
Article
Shades of Fine Dark Chocolate Colors: Polyphenol Metabolomics and Molecular Networking to Enlighten the Brown from the Black
by Aecio Luís de Sousa Dias, Julie-Anne Fenger, Emmanuelle Meudec, Arnaud Verbaere, Pierre Costet, Clotilde Hue, Florent Coste, Sophie Lair, Véronique Cheynier, Jean-Claude Boulet and Nicolas Sommerer
Metabolites 2023, 13(5), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13050667 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 2466
Abstract
High-quality dark chocolates (70% cocoa content) can have shades from light to dark brown color. This work aimed at revealing compounds that discriminate black and brown chocolates. From 37 fine chocolate samples from years 2019 and 2020 provided by Valrhona,8 dark black samples [...] Read more.
High-quality dark chocolates (70% cocoa content) can have shades from light to dark brown color. This work aimed at revealing compounds that discriminate black and brown chocolates. From 37 fine chocolate samples from years 2019 and 2020 provided by Valrhona,8 dark black samples and 8 light brown samples were selected. A non-targeted metabolomics study was performed based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—high resolution mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry experiments, univariate, multivariate, and feature-based molecular networking analyses. Twenty-seven overaccumulated discriminating compounds were found for black chocolates. Among them, glycosylated flavanols including monomers and glycosylated A-type procyanidin dimers and trimers were highly representative. Fifty overaccumulated discriminating compounds were found for brown chocolates. Most of them were B-type procyanidins (from trimers to nonamers). These phenolic compounds may be partially related to the chocolate colors as precursors of colored compounds. This study increases the knowledge on the chemical diversity of dark chocolates by providing new information about the phenolic profiles of black and brown chocolates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants)
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22 pages, 1373 KiB  
Article
Food Service Kitchen Scraps as a Source of Bioactive Phytochemicals: Disposal Survey, Optimized Extraction, Metabolomic Screening and Chemometric Evaluation
by Tatiana de Souza Medina, Carolina Thomaz dos Santos D’Almeida, Talita Pimenta do Nascimento, Joel Pimentel de Abreu, Vanessa Rosse de Souza, Diego Calandrini Kalili, Anderson Junger Teodoro, Luiz Claudio Cameron, Maria Gabriela Koblitz and Mariana Simões Larraz Ferreira
Metabolites 2023, 13(3), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13030386 - 5 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1204
Abstract
Untargeted metabolomics is a powerful tool with high resolution and the capability to characterize a wide range of bioactive natural products from fruit and vegetable by-products (FVB). Thus, this approach was applied in the study to evaluate the phenolic compounds (PC) by metabolomic [...] Read more.
Untargeted metabolomics is a powerful tool with high resolution and the capability to characterize a wide range of bioactive natural products from fruit and vegetable by-products (FVB). Thus, this approach was applied in the study to evaluate the phenolic compounds (PC) by metabolomic screening in five FVB after optimizing their extraction. The total phenolic content and antioxidant activity analyses were able to select the best extractor (SM) and ultrasonication time (US) for each FVB; methanol was used as a control. Although ultrasonication yielded a lower number of PC identifications (84 PC), the US extract was the most efficient in total ionic abundance (+21% and +29% compared to the total PC and SM extracts, respectively). Ultrasonication also increased the phenolic acid (+38%) and flavonoid classes (+19%) extracted compared to SM, while the multivariate analyses showed the control as the most dissimilar sample. FVB extracted from the same parts of the vegetable/fruit showed similarities and papaya seed presented the most atypical profile. The application of the metabolomics approach increased the knowledge of the bioactive potential of the evaluated residues and possibilities of exploring and valorizing the generated extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants)
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18 pages, 2592 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Capacity, Antitumor Activity and Metabolomic Profile of a Beetroot Peel Flour
by Pedro Paulo Saldanha Coimbra, Anna Carolina Alves Gomes da Silva-e-Silva, Ananda da Silva Antonio, Henrique Marcelo Gualberto Pereira, Valdir Florêncio da Veiga-Junior, Israel Felzenszwalb, Carlos Fernando Araujo-Lima and Anderson Junger Teodoro
Metabolites 2023, 13(2), 277; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13020277 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1991
Abstract
In this study, a beetroot peel flour was made, and its in vitro antioxidant activity was determined in aqueous (BPFw) and ethanolic (BPFe) extracts. The influence of BPFw on breast cancer cell viability was also determined. A targeted betalain profile was obtained using [...] Read more.
In this study, a beetroot peel flour was made, and its in vitro antioxidant activity was determined in aqueous (BPFw) and ethanolic (BPFe) extracts. The influence of BPFw on breast cancer cell viability was also determined. A targeted betalain profile was obtained using high-resolution Q-Extractive Plus Orbitrap mass spectrometry (Obrtitrap-HRMS) alongside untargeted chemical profiling of BPFw using Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). BPFw and BPFe presented satisfactory antioxidant activities, with emphasis on the total phenolic compounds and ORAC results for BPFw (301.64 ± 0.20 mg GAE/100 g and 3032.78 ± 55.00 µmol T/100 g, respectively). The MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells presented reductions in viability when treated with BPFw, showing dose-dependent behavior, with MDA-MB-231 also showing time-dependent behavior. The chemical profiling of BPFw led to the identification of 9 betalains and 59 other compounds distributed amongst 28 chemical classes, with flavonoids and their derivates and coumarins being the most abundant. Three forms of betalain generated via thermal degradation were identified. However, regardless of thermal processing, the BPF still presented satisfactory antioxidant and anticancer activities, possibly due to synergism with other identified molecules with reported anticancer activities via different metabolic pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants)
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11 pages, 1525 KiB  
Article
Sugarcane Metabolome Compositional Stability in Pretreatment Processes for NMR Measurements
by Yasuhiro Date, Chiaki Ishikawa, Makoto Umeda, Yusuke Tarumoto, Megumi Okubo, Yasuaki Tamura and Hiroshi Ono
Metabolites 2022, 12(9), 862; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12090862 - 14 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1689
Abstract
Sugarcane is essential for global sugar production and its compressed juice is a key raw material for industrial products. Sugarcane juice includes various metabolites with abundances and compositional balances influencing product qualities and functionalities. Therefore, understanding the characteristic features of the sugarcane metabolome [...] Read more.
Sugarcane is essential for global sugar production and its compressed juice is a key raw material for industrial products. Sugarcane juice includes various metabolites with abundances and compositional balances influencing product qualities and functionalities. Therefore, understanding the characteristic features of the sugarcane metabolome is important. However, sugarcane compositional variability and stability, even in pretreatment processes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic studies, remains elusive. The objective of this study is to evaluate sugarcane juice metabolomic variability affected by centrifugation, filtration, and thermal pretreatments, as well as the time-course changes for determining optimal conditions for NMR-based metabolomic approach. The pretreatment processes left the metabolomic compositions unchanged, indicating that these pretreatments are compatible with one another and the studied metabolomes are comparable. The thermal processing provided stability to the metabolome for more than 32 h at room temperature. Based on the determined analytical conditions, we conducted an NMR-based metabolomic study to discriminate the differences in the harvest period and allowed for successfully identifying the characteristic metabolome. Our findings denote that NMR-based sugarcane metabolomics enable us to provide an opportunity to collect a massive amount of data upon collaboration between multiple researchers, resulting in the rapid construction of useful databases for both research purposes and industrial use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants)
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13 pages, 1535 KiB  
Article
Plant Metabolomics as a Tool for Detecting Adulterants in Edible Plant: A Case Study of Allium ursinum
by Stefan Ivanović, Katarina Simić, Stefan Lekić, Milka Jadranin, Ljubodrag Vujisić and Dejan Gođevac
Metabolites 2022, 12(9), 849; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12090849 - 9 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1580
Abstract
Allium ursinum and poisonous adulterants Convallaria majalis and Arum maculatum were used as a model for detection of adulterants in edible plant. A. ursinum samples were spiked with C. majalis and A. maculatum to mimic adulteration. Metabolomic fingerprinting of all samples was performed [...] Read more.
Allium ursinum and poisonous adulterants Convallaria majalis and Arum maculatum were used as a model for detection of adulterants in edible plant. A. ursinum samples were spiked with C. majalis and A. maculatum to mimic adulteration. Metabolomic fingerprinting of all samples was performed using 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the resulting data sets were subjected to multivariate data analysis. As a result of this analysis, signals of adulterants were extracted from the data, and the structures of biomarkers of adulteration from partially purified samples were elucidated using 2D NMR and LC-MS techniques. Thus, isovitexin and vicenin II, azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, and trigonelline indicated adulteration of A. ursinum samples with C. majalis. Isovitexin was also recognized to be an indicator of adulteration of A. ursinum with A. maculatum. In conclusion, the case study of A. ursinum suggested that plant metabolomics approach could be utilized for identification of low molecular weight biomarkers of adulteration in edible plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proteomics and Metabolomics Studies of Food Plants)
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