Lipid Metabolism and Cardiometabolic Diseases: Latest Advances and Prospects

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Lipid Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2312

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Clinical Physiology, CNR, I-56124 Pisa, Italy
Interests: cardiometabolic disease; lipid metabolism; cardio-vascular disease; metabolic disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipids play a key role in several process associated with physiological conditions, such as cell function, metabolism, and distribution. Changes in lipid components can have profound effects on cell function, the immune system, antioxidant defenses, and inflammatory responses. Lipid metabolites are indispensable regulators of physiological and pathological processes, including atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and coronary artery disease (CAD). The determination of individual lipid characteristics (composition and abundance) via new tools and information technologies in biosamples could be a powerful tool able to facilitate an understanding of the mechanisms implicated in lipid-based diseases. The mechanisms that are related to lipids and particular species (i.e., ceramides, phosphocholine, lysophosphatidylcholines) and the development of CAD remain poorly understood. We invite investigators to contribute either original research or review articles that are in accordance with this Special Issue, which focuses on the interplay among lipid dysregulation-related diseases, including diabetes, obesity, metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), atherosclerosis, hypertension, and CAD. Subtopics that are also of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Lipid assessment and cardiometabolic syndrome;
  • Metabolomic/lipidomic approach and cardiometabolic risk;
  • Glucose metabolism and diabetes associated with cardiometabolic disease;
  • Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and coronary artery disease;
  • Lipidomic techniques for the discovery of new biomarkers and diagnostic/prognostic tools for cardiometabolic disease.

Dr. Melania Gaggini
Dr. Cristina Vassalle
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • lipidomic
  • lipotoxicity
  • oxidative stress
  • obesity
  • dyslipidemia
  • cardiovascular risk
  • diabetes
  • insulin resistance
  • fatty liver

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1228 KiB  
Article
Vitamin D and Ceramide Metabolomic Profile in Acute Myocardial Infarction
by Melania Gaggini, Federica Marchi, Nataliya Pylypiv, Alessandra Parlanti, Simona Storti, Umberto Paradossi, Sergio Berti and Cristina Vassalle
Metabolites 2024, 14(4), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14040233 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Sphingolipids (SLs) influence several cellular pathways, while vitamin D exerts many extraskeletal effects in addition to its traditional biological functions, including the modulation of calcium homeostasis and bone health. Moreover, Vitamin D and SLs affect the regulation of each others’ metabolism; hence, this [...] Read more.
Sphingolipids (SLs) influence several cellular pathways, while vitamin D exerts many extraskeletal effects in addition to its traditional biological functions, including the modulation of calcium homeostasis and bone health. Moreover, Vitamin D and SLs affect the regulation of each others’ metabolism; hence, this study aims to evaluate the relationship between the levels of 25(OH)D and ceramides in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In particular, the blood abundance of eight ceramides and 25(OH)D was evaluated in 134 AMI patients (aged 68.4 ± 12.0 years, 72% males). A significant inverse correlation between 25(OH)D and both Cer(d18:1/16:0) and Cer(d18:1/18:0) was found; indeed, patients with severe hypovitaminosis D (<10 ng/mL) showed the highest levels of the two investigated ceramides. Moreover, diabetic/dyslipidemic patients with suboptimal levels of 25(OH)D (<30 ng/mL) had higher levels of both the ceramides when compared with the rest of the population. On the other hand, 25(OH)D remained an independent determinant for Cer(d18:1/16:0) (STD Coeff −0.18, t-Value −2, p ≤ 0.05) and Cer(d18:1/18:0) (−0.2, −2.2, p < 0.05). In light of these findings, the crosstalk between sphingolipids and vitamin D may unravel additional mechanisms by which these molecules can influence CV risk in AMI. Full article
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9 pages, 213 KiB  
Article
Association between Dyslipidemia and Glycated Hemoglobin in a Population-Based Study
by Purum Kang, Ka Young Kim and Hye Young Shin
Metabolites 2024, 14(2), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14020092 - 26 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the prevalence of dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus among individuals over 30 years of age in Korea has continuously increased. The current study therefore investigated the association between dyslipidemia and high glycated [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia are well-known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the prevalence of dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus among individuals over 30 years of age in Korea has continuously increased. The current study therefore investigated the association between dyslipidemia and high glycated hemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c) levels according to age group in adults over 20 years old. We used data from the 7th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2016 to 2017. Glycated hemoglobin, a well-established marker for elevated glucose levels, was categorized into three groups, normal (<5.7%), prediabetes (5.7–6.4%), and diabetes (≥6.5%). The presence of dyslipidemia was defined based on a diagnosis of dyslipidemia by a physician. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between the prevalence of dyslipidemia and glycated hemoglobin according to age group. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, sex, body mass index, marital status, education, occupation, household income, drinking, and smoking, we found a significant increase in the odds ratios (ORs) for dyslipidemia in the prediabetes (OR; 1.915, 95% CI; 1.696 to 2.163) and diabetes (OR; 3.533, 95% CI; 3.019 to 4.134) groups. Among subjects with higher glycated hemoglobin levels, those in their 40s or over had significantly increased odds for dyslipidemia. The current study found an association between high glycated hemoglobin levels and a diagnosis of dyslipidemia among Korean adults. Markers of lipid metabolism in adults with high glycated hemoglobin levels may need to be monitored, especially those in their 40s and older. Full article
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