Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Signatures in Health and Disease

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology and Clinical Metabolic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 13340

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Physiology, University of Padova, Francesco Marzolo 3, 35131 Padova, Italy
Interests: skeletal muscle metabolism; disuse atrophy; sarcoplasmic reticulum and calcium handling; sarcolemmal membrane and hemichannels; local inflammation; aging and inactivity; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Changes in skeletal muscle metabolism reflect both physio- and pathological states in humans and preclinical models. Multiple processes and mechanisms, including altered hormonal status, low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and redox stress, altered myocyte autophagy, loss of α-motor neurons, accelerated myonuclei apoptosis, and impaired satellite cell function have been identified as contributors to muscle wasting under various conditions. This Special Issue aims to gather contributions from basic and clinical researchers, to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of muscle loss during disuse and aging, or in the setting of specific diseases and their metabolic signatures.

We therefore invite researchers in the area of muscle wasting to submit their latest original research or review articles to this Special Issue.

Dr. Giuseppe Sirago
Dr. Anna Picca
Dr. Emanuele Marzetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomarkers 
  • skeletal muscle diseases 
  • disuse 
  • exercise 
  • sarcopenia 
  • metabolic signatures

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 3470 KiB  
Article
Serum Metabolites Associated with Muscle Hypertrophy after 8 Weeks of High- and Low-Load Resistance Training
Metabolites 2023, 13(3), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13030335 - 24 Feb 2023
Viewed by 9459
Abstract
The mechanisms responsible for the similar muscle growth attained with high- and low-load resistance training (RT) have not yet been fully elucidated. One mechanism is related to the mechanical stimulus and the level of motor unit recruitment; another mechanism is related to the [...] Read more.
The mechanisms responsible for the similar muscle growth attained with high- and low-load resistance training (RT) have not yet been fully elucidated. One mechanism is related to the mechanical stimulus and the level of motor unit recruitment; another mechanism is related to the metabolic response. We investigated the electromyographic signal amplitude (sEMG) and the general metabolic response to high-load RT (HL) and low-load resistance training (LL). We measured muscle thickness by ultrasound, sEMG amplitude by electromyography, and analysis of metabolites expressed through metabolomics. No differences were observed between the HL and LL groups for metabolic response and muscle thickness. A greater amplitude of sEMG was observed in the HL group. In addition, a correlation was observed between changes in muscle thickness of the vastus lateralis muscle in the HL group and levels of the metabolites carnitine, creatine, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, phenylalanine, asparagine, creatine phosphate, and methionine. In the LL group, a correlation was observed between changes in muscle thickness of the vastus lateralis muscle and levels of the metabolites acetoacetate, creatine phosphate, and oxypurinol. These correlations seem to be related to the characteristics of activated muscle fibers, the metabolic demand of the training protocols used, and the process of protein synthesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Signatures in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1764 KiB  
Article
Pancreatic Cancer Cell-Conditioned, Human-Derived Primary Myotubes Display Increased Leucine Turnover, Increased Lipid Accumulation, and Reduced Glucose Uptake
Metabolites 2022, 12(11), 1095; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12111095 - 10 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1468
Abstract
Metabolic alterations occurring in cancer cells have been seen to also occur in other tissues than cancerous tissue. For instance, cachexia, peripheral insulin resistance, or both are commonly seen in patients with cancer. We explored differences in substrate use in myotubes conditioned with [...] Read more.
Metabolic alterations occurring in cancer cells have been seen to also occur in other tissues than cancerous tissue. For instance, cachexia, peripheral insulin resistance, or both are commonly seen in patients with cancer. We explored differences in substrate use in myotubes conditioned with the medium from a pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1, or primary human pancreatic cells, hPECs. Protein turnover was assessed using scintillation proximity assay, glucose and oleic acid handling were analyzed by substrate oxidation assay. We performed qPCR to study gene expression and immunoblotting and proteomic analyses to study protein expression. PANC-1-conditioned myotubes had an imbalance in protein turnover with decreased accumulation, increased decay, and decreased MYH2 gene expression. Glucose uptake decreased despite increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Fatty acid uptake increased, whereas fatty acid oxidation was unchanged, leading to accumulation of intracellular lipids (TAG) in PANC-1-conditioned myotubes. Secretome analyses revealed increased release of growth factors and growth factor receptor from PANC-1 cells, potentially affecting muscle cell metabolism. Myotubes exposed to pancreatic cancer cell medium displayed altered energy metabolism with increased protein/leucine turnover and lipid accumulation, while glucose uptake and oxidation reduced. This indicates production and release of substances from pancreatic cancer cells affecting skeletal muscle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Signatures in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

12 pages, 2518 KiB  
Article
Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial and Perilipin Content in a Cohort of Obese Subjects Undergoing Moderate and High Intensity Training
Metabolites 2022, 12(9), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12090855 - 11 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1770
Abstract
Obesity is a complex condition characterized by abnormal and excessive fat accumulation, resulting in an increased risk for severe health problems. Skeletal muscles play a major role in movement and fat catabolism, but the insulin resistance that comes with obesity makes it difficult [...] Read more.
Obesity is a complex condition characterized by abnormal and excessive fat accumulation, resulting in an increased risk for severe health problems. Skeletal muscles play a major role in movement and fat catabolism, but the insulin resistance that comes with obesity makes it difficult to fulfill these tasks. In this study, we analyse two types of training protocols, moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) versus high intensity interval training (HIIT), in a cohort of obese subjects to establish which muscle adaptations favour fat consumption in response to exercise. Mitochondria play a role in fat oxidation. We found protein upregulation of mitochondrial biomarkers, TOMM20 and Cox-4, in HIIT but not in MICT, without detecting any shifts in fibre composition phenotype of the vastus lateralis in both training groups. Interestingly, both MICT and HIIT protocols showed increased protein levels of perilipin PLIN2, which is involved in the delivery and consumption of fats. HIIT also augmented perilipin PLIN5. Perilipins are involved in fat storage in skeletal muscles and their upregulation, along with the analysis of circulatory lipid profiles reported in the present study, suggest important adaptations induced by the two types of training protocols that favour fat consumption and weight loss in obese subjects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Skeletal Muscle Metabolic Signatures in Health and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop