Metabolomics in Neurodegenerative Diseases

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 December 2024 | Viewed by 1771

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Metabolomics Department, Beaumont Research Institute, Corewell Health East William-Beaumont University Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, USA
Interests: Alzheimer’s disease; mild cognitive impairment; Parkinson’s disease; delirium; neurodegeneration; metabolomics; biomarkers; biochemistry; etiology; pathophysiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Metabolomics Department, Beaumont Research Institute, Corewell Health East William-Beaumont University Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, USA
Interests: delirium; Alzheimer’s disease; Parkinson’s disease; metabolomics; biomarkers; biochemistry; etiology; pathophysiology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Metabolomics Department, Beaumont Research Institute, Corewell Health East William-Beaumont University Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, USA
Interests: Alzheimer’s disease; Parkinson’s disease; TBI; multiple sclerosis; Huntington's disease; metabolomics; biomarkers; multi-omics; etiology; statistical modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics in neurodegenerative diseases holds promise as a dynamic field elucidating molecular insights into conditions like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and many more. This promising discipline scrutinizes the intricate metabolic profiles of biological systems, aiding in the identification of biomarkers, unraveling disease mechanisms, and advancing diagnostic precision. By employing advanced analytical techniques, such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, researchers scrutinize alterations in metabolite patterns associated with neurodegeneration. These alterations encompass disrupted energy metabolism, aberrant lipid processing, and amino acid imbalances, among many others, offering invaluable clues regarding the intricate pathophysiology of these diseases. Metabolomics also paves the way for novel therapeutic targets and personalized interventions. However, challenges remain in standardization, data integration, and comprehending causative relationships. This special edition of Metabolites underscores the accelerating role of metabolomics in deepening our comprehension of neurodegenerative disorders, fostering innovative diagnostic avenues and treatment strategies.

Dr. Stewart Francis Graham
Dr. Nazia M. Saiyed
Dr. Ali Yilmaz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • neurodegenerative disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Huntington’s disease
  • ALS
  • neurodegeneration
  • biomarkers
  • metabolism
  • etiology
  • pathophysiology
  • biochemistry

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 968 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Biological Mechanisms Linking Smoking Behavior and Cognitive Function: A Mediation Analysis of Untargeted Metabolomics
by Jerome J. Choi, Rebecca L. Koscik, Erin M. Jonaitis, Daniel J. Panyard, Autumn R. Morrow, Sterling C. Johnson, Corinne D. Engelman and Lauren L. Schmitz
Metabolites 2023, 13(11), 1154; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13111154 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1179
Abstract
(1) Smoking is the most significant preventable health hazard in the modern world. It increases the risk of vascular problems, which are also risk factors for dementia. In addition, toxins in cigarettes increase oxidative stress and inflammation, which have both been linked to [...] Read more.
(1) Smoking is the most significant preventable health hazard in the modern world. It increases the risk of vascular problems, which are also risk factors for dementia. In addition, toxins in cigarettes increase oxidative stress and inflammation, which have both been linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD). This study identified potential mechanisms of the smoking–cognitive function relationship using metabolomics data from the longitudinal Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (WRAP). (2) 1266 WRAP participants were included to assess the association between smoking status and four cognitive composite scores. Next, untargeted metabolomic data were used to assess the relationships between smoking and metabolites. Metabolites significantly associated with smoking were then tested for association with cognitive composite scores. Total effect models and mediation models were used to explore the role of metabolites in smoking-cognitive function pathways. (3) Plasma N-acetylneuraminate was associated with smoking status Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite 3 (PACC3) and Immediate Learning (IMM). N-acetylneuraminate mediated 12% of the smoking-PACC3 relationship and 13% of the smoking-IMM relationship. (4) These findings provide links between previous studies that can enhance our understanding of potential biological pathways between smoking and cognitive function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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