Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology and Drug Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 8357

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, School of Medico Legal Studies, National Forensic Sciences University, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India
Interests: metabolic abnormalities in cancer, cachexia and cardiovascular diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolic disease is a cluster of diseases which occur due to alterations in various metabolic processes of our body due to abnormal biochemical reactions. There could be alterations in carbohydrate, protein, and/or lipid metabolism hampering overall functions of the body. Certain metabolic diseases include (but are not limited to) type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) etc. During advanced stages of cancer, cachexia starts developing which also involves altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Such diseases make patients prone to other diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. This Special Issue will familiarize readers with molecular mechanisms of various metabolic diseases and approaches for pharmacological treatment of metabolic diseases. We therefore invite research/review papers focusing on any metabolic disease. We also aim to bring into the limelight any strategies to curb diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and NAFLD.

Dr. Bhoomika Patel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
  • syndrome X
  • cancer cachexia
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • insulin resistance

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

12 pages, 1024 KiB  
Article
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate, an Adrenal Androgen, Is Inversely Associated with Prevalence of Dynapenia in Male Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes
by Saya Yasui, Yousuke Kaneko, Hiroki Yamagami, Minae Hosoki, Taiki Hori, Akihiro Tani, Tomoyo Hara, Kiyoe Kurahashi, Takeshi Harada, Shingen Nakamura, Toshiki Otoda, Tomoyuki Yuasa, Hiroyasu Mori, Akio Kuroda, Itsuro Endo, Munehide Matsuhisa, Takeshi Soeki and Ken-ichi Aihara
Metabolites 2023, 13(11), 1129; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13111129 - 03 Nov 2023
Viewed by 856
Abstract
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is thought to be associated with life expectancy and anti-aging. Although skeletal muscle disorders are often found in diabetic people, the clinical significance of DHEAS in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether DHEAS is associated with [...] Read more.
Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is thought to be associated with life expectancy and anti-aging. Although skeletal muscle disorders are often found in diabetic people, the clinical significance of DHEAS in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether DHEAS is associated with the development of skeletal muscle disorders in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A cross-sectional study was conducted in 361 individuals with T2D. Serum DHEAS levels, skeletal muscle mass index (SMI), handgrip strength (HS), and gait speed (GS) were measured in the participants. Pre-sarcopenia, sarcopenia, and dynapenia were defined according to the definitions of the AWGS 2019 criteria. DHEAS level was positively associated with HS but not with SMI or GS after adjustment of confounding factors. Multiple logistic regression analyses in total subjects showed that DHEAS level had an inverse association with the prevalence of dynapenia but not with the prevalence of pre-sarcopenia or sarcopenia. Furthermore, a significant association between DHEAS level and dynapenia was found in males but not in females. ROC curve analysis indicated that cutoff values of serum DHEAS for risk of dynapenia in males was 92.0 μg/dL. Therefore, in male individuals with T2D who have low serum levels of DHEAS, adequate exercise might be needed to prevent dynapenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1222 KiB  
Article
Body Composition and Cardiovascular Risk: A Study of Polish Military Flying Personnel
by Agata Gaździńska, Stefan Gaździński, Paweł Jagielski and Paweł Kler
Metabolites 2023, 13(10), 1102; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13101102 - 21 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1173
Abstract
(1) Background: Military personnel worldwide exhibit high rates of obesity. Obesity, and especially visceral obesity, contribute to various health issues, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). While BMI is commonly used to diagnose obesity, it has limitations and does not consider [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Military personnel worldwide exhibit high rates of obesity. Obesity, and especially visceral obesity, contribute to various health issues, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). While BMI is commonly used to diagnose obesity, it has limitations and does not consider factors like fat distribution or muscle mass. This study aims to assess the relationship between BMI, percent body fat, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and cardiovascular risk factors in Polish military flying personnel. Methods: This study involved 200 men from the Polish Air Force aged 38.8 ± 8.5 years. Anthropometric tests, body composition tests, and tests of biochemical markers of CVD were conducted. (2) Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity varied based on the evaluation criterion; they were present in 63.5% of soldiers by BMI and in 52.5% by percent body fat; abdominal obesity was present in almost half (47%) of the surveyed soldiers according to WC and in 62.5% according to WHtR. All markers of obesity correlated positively with various biochemical markers of CVD, and 8.5% of subjects met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. (3) Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity in Polish military flying personnel, regardless of the evaluation criterion, is associated with significant metabolic complications in the form of lipid disorders and insulin resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 294 KiB  
Article
Plasma Amino Acids in NAFLD Patients with Obesity Are Associated with Steatosis and Fibrosis: Results from the MAST4HEALTH Study
by Athina I. Amanatidou, Eleni V. Mikropoulou, Charalampia Amerikanou, Maja Milanovic, Stefan Stojanoski, Mladen Bjelan, Lucia Cesarini, Jonica Campolo, Anastasia Thanopoulou, Rajarshi Banerjee, Mary Jo Kurth, Natasa Milic, Milica Medic-Stojanoska, Maria Giovanna Trivella, Sophie Visvikis-Siest, Amalia Gastaldelli, Maria Halabalaki, Andriana C. Kaliora, George V. Dedoussis and on behalf of the Mast4Health consortium
Metabolites 2023, 13(8), 959; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13080959 - 18 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1086
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been linked to changes in amino acid (AA) levels. The objective of the current study was to examine the relationship between MRI parameters that reflect inflammation and fibrosis and plasma AA concentrations in [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have been linked to changes in amino acid (AA) levels. The objective of the current study was to examine the relationship between MRI parameters that reflect inflammation and fibrosis and plasma AA concentrations in NAFLD patients. Plasma AA levels of 97 NAFLD patients from the MAST4HEALTH study were quantified with liquid chromatography. Medical, anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics were collected and biochemical parameters, as well as inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, were measured. In total, subjects with a higher MRI-proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) exhibited higher plasma AA levels compared to subjects with lower PDFF. The concentrations of BCAAs (p-Value: 0.03), AAAs (p-Value: 0.039), L-valine (p-Value: 0.029), L-tyrosine (p-Value: 0.039) and L-isoleucine (p-Value: 0.032) were found to be significantly higher in the higher PDFF group compared to lower group. Plasma AA levels varied according to MRI-PDFF. Significant associations were also demonstrated between AAs and MRI-PDFF and MRI-cT1, showing the potential utility of circulating AAs as diagnostic markers of NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

18 pages, 1268 KiB  
Review
Environment, Endocrine Disruptors, and Fatty Liver Disease Associated with Metabolic Dysfunction (MASLD)
by Antonella Mosca, Melania Manco, Maria Rita Braghini, Stefano Cianfarani, Giuseppe Maggiore, Anna Alisi and Andrea Vania
Metabolites 2024, 14(1), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14010071 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1688
Abstract
Ecological theories suggest that environmental factors significantly influence obesity risk and related syndemic morbidities, including metabolically abnormal obesity associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (MASLD). These factors encompass anthropogenic influences and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), synergistically interacting to induce metabolic discrepancies, notably in early [...] Read more.
Ecological theories suggest that environmental factors significantly influence obesity risk and related syndemic morbidities, including metabolically abnormal obesity associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (MASLD). These factors encompass anthropogenic influences and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), synergistically interacting to induce metabolic discrepancies, notably in early life, and disrupt metabolic processes in adulthood. This review focuses on endocrine disruptors affecting a child’s MASLD risk, independent of their role as obesogens and thus regardless of their impact on adipogenesis. The liver plays a pivotal role in metabolic and detoxification processes, where various lipophilic endocrine-disrupting molecules accumulate in fatty liver parenchyma, exacerbating inflammation and functioning as new anthropogenics that perpetuate chronic low-grade inflammation, especially insulin resistance, crucial in the pathogenesis of MASLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 2274 KiB  
Review
Understanding the Consequences of Fatty Bone and Fatty Muscle: How the Osteosarcopenic Adiposity Phenotype Uncovers the Deterioration of Body Composition
by Kelsey Hu, Elizabeth Deya Edelen, Wenqing Zhuo, Aliya Khan, Josselyne Orbegoso, Lindsey Greenfield, Berna Rahi, Michael Griffin, Jasminka Z. Ilich and Owen J. Kelly
Metabolites 2023, 13(10), 1056; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13101056 - 07 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1882
Abstract
Adiposity is central to aging and several chronic diseases. Adiposity encompasses not just the excess adipose tissue but also body fat redistribution, fat infiltration, hypertrophy of adipocytes, and the shifting of mesenchymal stem cell commitment to adipogenesis. Bone marrow adipose tissue expansion, inflammatory [...] Read more.
Adiposity is central to aging and several chronic diseases. Adiposity encompasses not just the excess adipose tissue but also body fat redistribution, fat infiltration, hypertrophy of adipocytes, and the shifting of mesenchymal stem cell commitment to adipogenesis. Bone marrow adipose tissue expansion, inflammatory adipokines, and adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles are central to the development of osteopenic adiposity. Adipose tissue infiltration and local adipogenesis within the muscle are critical in developing sarcopenic adiposity and subsequent poorer functional outcomes. Ultimately, osteosarcopenic adiposity syndrome is the result of all the processes noted above: fat infiltration and adipocyte expansion and redistribution within the bone, muscle, and adipose tissues, resulting in bone loss, muscle mass/strength loss, deteriorated adipose tissue, and subsequent functional decline. Increased fat tissue, typically referred to as obesity and expressed by body mass index (the latter often used inadequately), is now occurring in younger age groups, suggesting people will live longer with the negative effects of adiposity. This review discusses the role of adiposity in the deterioration of bone and muscle, as well as adipose tissue itself. It reveals how considering and including adiposity in the definition and diagnosis of osteopenic adiposity, sarcopenic adiposity, and osteosarcopenic adiposity will help in better understanding the pathophysiology of each and accelerate possible therapies and prevention approaches for both relatively healthy individuals or those with chronic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

9 pages, 2622 KiB  
Brief Report
Genistein Suppresses IL-6 and MMP-13 to Attenuate Osteoarthritis in Obese Diabetic Mice
by Janelle Lopez, Layla Al-Nakkash, Tom L. Broderick, Monica Castro, Brielle Tobin and Jeffrey H. Plochocki
Metabolites 2023, 13(9), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13091014 - 14 Sep 2023
Viewed by 831
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis (OA) often present as comorbidities. We examined the role of plasma IL-6, chondrocyte MMP-13, and col10a expression in the development of OA in obese diabetic mice. We further investigated dietary genistein and exercise training as potential mitigators [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis (OA) often present as comorbidities. We examined the role of plasma IL-6, chondrocyte MMP-13, and col10a expression in the development of OA in obese diabetic mice. We further investigated dietary genistein and exercise training as potential mitigators of OA. One hundred adult mice (50 females, 50 males) aged 6 weeks were randomized into 5 groups, including lean controls, obese diabetic controls, and obese diabetic mice treated with genistein, exercise training, and genistein plus exercise training. The obese diabetic state was induced by feeding the mice a high-fat, high-sugar diet. Genistein was incorporated into the diet at a concentration of 600 mg genistein/kg. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill and consisted of daily 30 min sessions at 12 m/min, 5 days/week for a 12-week period. After treatment, plasma was collected, and proximal tibias were removed for analysis. Plasma IL-6 and MMP-13 were elevated while col10a was reduced in obese diabetic mice in comparison to lean controls. Dietary genistein treatment reduced IL-6 and MMP-13 expression and increased col10a expression. Histological examination of articular cartilage showed reduced thickness of the uncalcified zones and proteoglycan content in the cartilage of diabetic mice in comparison to mice fed genistein. Exercise training had no significant effect. In conclusion, genistein (and not exercise training) attenuates OA by reducing IL-6 and MMP-13 expression in diabetic mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop