Nanocomposite Membranes for Water Treatment and Desalination

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 2722

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Environmental Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul, Turkey
Interests: ceramic and polymeric membrane processes; membrane bioreactors; nanobiohybrids development; biobased and eco-friendly nanofiber fabrication; membrane-assisted technologies for urban/drinking/industrial water treatment/specific recalcitrant organic pollutants/resource recovery/clean indoor environment/carbon dioxide capture; multicriteria decision-making tools for selection of membrane-based process alternatives; circular economy approach for re-use of end-of-life membranes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocomposites are used in membrane technology to improve membrane material performance, reduce membrane fouling and extend membrane life. The production and use of these membranes is one of the applications of nanotechnology for water treatment. Nanocomposite membranes are manufactured by incorporating inorganic or organic nanoparticles (NPs) into the polymeric membrane matrix. In the use of membrane-based technologies for water treatment, the use of nanofillers is widespread to overcome the limitations of polymeric membranes and/or improve their performance. In recent years, nanocomposite membranes have been widely used in wastewater treatment; desalination; water treatment; and the removal of microorganisms, chemical compounds and heavy metals, etc. They are used to remove pollutants such as. Silver (Ag), titanium (TiO2), zinc (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene oxide (GO), aluminum (Al2O3), silicon (SiO2), iron (Fe3O4), cobalt (Co), zirconium (ZrO2), clay nanoparticles, and zeolite (NaX), as well as some new nanoscale materials, are being used to make these polymer membranes. These nanomaterials offer great advances, such as improving the mechanical properties of the membranes, improving their thermal stability, increasing hydrophilicity in water treatment, preventing the accumulation of pollutants, as well as increasing and improving rejection efficiencies and flux.

The aim of this Membranes Special Issue entitled "Nanocomposite membranes for water treatment and desalination" is to provide up-to-date information on the production of new types of nanocomposite membranes and their contribution to various membrane processes and applications in water treatment and desalination. In particular, recent studies are being promoted on the use of nanomaterials that offer more environmentally friendly and sustainable solutions or are produced using green synthesis methods without harming the environment. We intend to publish studies on the latest advances in innovative membrane technologies, both on an industrial and scientific level, as well as on value-added products and economic considerations, although papers on other relevant subjects will also be considered. The results of studies on the application of membranes produced with different nanomaterials in different membrane processes will lead to the formation of an extensive database, which is an important step for the large-scale usability and commercialization of these membranes.

We look forward to your contributions.

Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Emerging classes of promising water-purifying nanomaterials in membrane fabrication;
  • Specific applications and treatment mechanisms of emerging nanomaterials in membrane systems;
  • Mono and hybrid nano-structured materials for membrane fabrication: progress, challenges and prospects;
  • Engineered carbon structures/composites/hybrid materials in membrane fabrication for potential application in water treatment and desalination;
  • Membrane development with carbon-based materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene etc.) for removal of organic contaminants from water;
  • Metallic nanoparticles for membrane fabrication: green synthesis, applications, and future perspectives;
  • Clay-based nanomaterials for membrane fabrication and their application to the removal of specific contaminants from water;
  • Multifunctional polymer-based materials for desalination membrane fabrication;
  • Photocatalytic and antimicrobial multifunctional nanocomposite membranes for the treatment of priority and emerging pollutants in water;
  • Use of cellulose-based materials in membrane fabrication for water treatment;
  • Environmentally friendly and bio-based nanomaterials: innovative and sustainable solutions for membrane fabrication;
  • Chitosan-based membranes for water treatment;
  • Silica-based mesoporous materials for membrane development.

Dr. Derya Y. Koseoglu-Imer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 4616 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membranes with Amine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide for Air Dehumidification and Water Treatment
by Omnya Abdalla, Abdul Rehman, Ahmed Nabeeh, Md A. Wahab, Ahmed Abdel-Wahab and Ahmed Abdala
Membranes 2023, 13(7), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes13070678 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1359
Abstract
Porous low-pressure membranes have been used as active membranes in water treatment and as support for thin-film composite membranes used in water desalination and gas separation applications. In this article, microfiltration polysulfone (PSf)mixed-matrix membranes (MMM) containing amine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-NH2) were [...] Read more.
Porous low-pressure membranes have been used as active membranes in water treatment and as support for thin-film composite membranes used in water desalination and gas separation applications. In this article, microfiltration polysulfone (PSf)mixed-matrix membranes (MMM) containing amine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-NH2) were fabricated via a phase inversion process and characterized using XPS, SEM, AFM, DMA, XRD, and contact angle measurements. The effect of GO-NH2 concentration on membrane morphology, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, and oil–water separation performance was analyzed. Significant enhancements in membrane hydrophilicity, porosity, mechanical properties, permeability, and selectivity were achieved at very low GO-NH2 concentrations (0.05–0.2 wt.%). In particular, the water permeability of the membrane containing 0.2 wt.% GO-NH2 was 92% higher than the pure PSf membrane, and the oil rejection reached 95.6% compared to 91.7% for the pure PSf membrane. The membrane stiffness was also increased by 98% compared to the pure PSf membrane. Importantly, the antifouling characteristics of the PSf-GO-NH2 MMMs were significantly improved. When filtering 100 ppm bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution, the PSf-GO-NH2 MMMs demonstrated a slower flux decline and an impressive flux recovery after washing. Notably, the control membrane showed a flux recovery of only 69%, while the membrane with 0.2 wt.% GO-NH2 demonstrated an exceptional flux recovery of 88%. Furthermore, the membranes exhibited enhanced humidity removal performance, with a permeance increase from 13,710 to 16,408. These results indicate that the PSf-GO-NH2 MMM is an excellent candidate for reliable oil–water separation and humidity control applications, with notable improvements in antifouling performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Membranes for Water Treatment and Desalination)
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19 pages, 5269 KiB  
Article
Effect of Polydopamine/Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Modified Halloysite on the Microstructure and Permeability of a Polyamide Forward Osmosis Membrane
by Jie Yu, Weiqi Jing, Eryong Liu, Shuangming Du, Hui Cai, Huiling Du and Jinlei Wang
Membranes 2023, 13(7), 638; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes13070638 - 30 Jun 2023
Viewed by 755
Abstract
Mine water cannot be directly consumed by trapped people when a mine collapses, so it is difficult for people to carry out emergency rescues to ensure their safety. Therefore, a water bag made of a forward osmosis (FO) membrane has been designed that [...] Read more.
Mine water cannot be directly consumed by trapped people when a mine collapses, so it is difficult for people to carry out emergency rescues to ensure their safety. Therefore, a water bag made of a forward osmosis (FO) membrane has been designed that can efficiently filter coal mine water to meet the urgent needs of emergency rescue. Before interfacial polymerization (IP), sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-modified halloysite (SDS−HNT) was added to an MPD aqueous solution to prepare an SDS−HNT polyamide active layer, and then the prepared membrane was placed into a polydopamine (PDA) solution formed by the self-polymerization of dopamine and a PDA/SDS−HNT composite film was prepared. The results showed that the original ridge−valley structure of the polyamide membrane was transformed to a rod-, circular-, and blade-like structure by the addition of SDS−HNTs. Subsequently, a dense PDA nanoparticle layer was formed on the modified membrane. The polyamide/polysulfone forward osmosis membrane modified by co-doping of PDA and SDS−HNTs displayed both the best water flux and rejection rate, confirming the synergistic effect of compound modification. Therefore, the high-performance permeability of the polyamide membrane modified by SDS−HNTs and PDA provides great convenience for the emergency filtration of coal mine water, and also has potential applications in wastewater treatment and seawater desalination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Membranes for Water Treatment and Desalination)
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