Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 26046

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Post-Graduate School of Oral Surgery, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: oral medicine; oral oncology; oral surgical pathology; pathological anatomy; microscopy; laser in medicine; laser application in oral surgical pathology; clinical and applied research; head and neck diseases; rare diseases with head and neck onset or involvement; implant rehabilitation of oncologic patients or affected by oral mucosa/jaw diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70124 Bari, Italy
Interests: clinical dentistry; restorative dentistry; oral surgery; oral pathology; dental implantology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As you well know, many systemic diseases (infective, genetic, autoimmune, neoplastic) may involve the oral cavity and, more generally, the soft and hard tissues of the head and neck region as primary or secondary localization. Primary onset in the oral cavity of both pediatric and adult diseases usually represents a true challenge for clinicians; their precocious detection surely results in the early diagnosis and therapy onset with following better prognosis and clinical outcomes.

The aim of the current Special Issue is to further improve the overall knowledge on clinical and radiological signs, symptoms, diagnostic procedures and techniques, and medical, surgical, and rehabilitative therapies (also by high-technology devices such as lasers, piezosurgery, software-aided procedures, etc.) of any generalized disease which may manifest to the head and neck. In addition, we aim to collect worldwide experiences on early and primary signs and symptoms of occurrence in the oral cavity and maxillo-facial district, as well as possible new associations of clinical signs and newly detected diseases (e.g., coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)).

We encourage the submission of original articles, reviews, systemic reviews, case series, and reports on typical and well-known diseases as well as uncommon diseases or new clinical findings.

Prof. Gianfranco Favia
Dr. Saverio Capodiferro
Dr. Luisa Limongelli
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • oral medicine
  • oral oncology
  • oral and maxillo-facial surgical pathology
  • conventional and confocal microscopy
  • laser in medicine
  • clinical and applied research
  • rare diseases
  • oral cancer patient rehabilitation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1903 KiB  
Article
Vertical Bone Gain after Sinus Lift Procedures with Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate and Simultaneous Implant Placement—A Cross-Sectional Study
by Juan Manuel Aragoneses Lamas, Margarita Gómez Sánchez, Leví Cuadrado González, Ana Suárez García and Javier Aragoneses Sánchez
Medicina 2020, 56(11), 609; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56110609 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2535
Abstract
Objectives: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the vertical bone gain achieved after the sinus lift procedure with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) used as a bone substitute and simultaneous implant placement. Methods: One hundred and twenty-eight sinus lift procedures [...] Read more.
Objectives: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the vertical bone gain achieved after the sinus lift procedure with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) used as a bone substitute and simultaneous implant placement. Methods: One hundred and twenty-eight sinus lift procedures (utilizing a synthetic ceramic containing 99.9% tricalcium phosphate as a bone substitute) and simultaneous implant placements were performed on 119 patients. The lateral window approach surgical protocol for maxillary sinus lift was performed on the patients. The implants were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) at 6 months following placement. The vertical bone gain was considered a primary variable, while implant length, diameter, and location were considered secondary variables. Results: The ANOVA results showed no statistical difference in vertical bone gain with implant parameters like implant length, width, and position. Pearsons correlation revealed a statistically significant positive correlation with vertical bone gain and implant length and diameter. A further multivariate linear regression analysis was performed and it observed statistically significant associations between the variables in the study after adjusting for confounding factors. Conclusions: This study concluded that there was vertical bone gain with the usage of β-TCP in maxillary sinus lift surgical procedure with immediate implant placement and that implant variables like length and diameter had a significant influence on the average bone gain values. The implant position did not have a statistically significant influence but there was considerable variation in the bone gain between first, second premolar, and molar regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases)
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Review

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12 pages, 662 KiB  
Review
Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Periodontal Disease: A Systematic Review
by Daniela Lembo, Francesco Caroccia, Chiara Lopes, Francesco Moscagiuri, Bruna Sinjari and Michele D’Attilio
Medicina 2021, 57(6), 640; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina57060640 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4250
Abstract
Background and Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Materials and Methods: Electronic search using PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, and Cochrane library was carried out for randomized controlled trials, [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Materials and Methods: Electronic search using PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, and Cochrane library was carried out for randomized controlled trials, cohort, case-control, longitudinal and epidemiological studies on humans published from January 2009 until September 2020. The participants had to be male and female adults who were diagnosed with OSAS either by overnight polysomnography (carried out at a sleep laboratory or at home) or by a home sleep testing monitor (Apnea Risk Evaluation System). Methodological quality assessment was carried out using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS) for case-control studies while an adapted form of NOS was used for cross-sectional studies. Results: Ten studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria of our review, 5 were case-control studies, and 5 cross-sectional. Sample size ranged from 50 to 29,284 subjects, for a total of 43,122 subjects, 56% of them were male, their age ranged from 18 to 85 years old. The heterogeneity among the studies regarding the classification of periodontal disease, and the different methods for OSAS severity assessment, complicated the comparison among the studies. Conclusions: There is low evidence of a possible association between OSAS and periodontitis. The pathophysiological mechanism, cause-effect, or dose-response relationship are still unclear. Further studies are needed and should use a precise classification of OSAS subjects, while the new classification of periodontitis from the World Workshop of Chicago 2017 should be used for the periodontal assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases)
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22 pages, 5041 KiB  
Review
Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases: An Overview
by Saverio Capodiferro, Luisa Limongelli and Gianfranco Favia
Medicina 2021, 57(3), 271; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina57030271 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 15032
Abstract
Many systemic (infective, genetic, autoimmune, neoplastic) diseases may involve the oral cavity and, more generally, the soft and hard tissues of the head and neck as primary or secondary localization. Primary onset in the oral cavity of both pediatric and adult diseases usually [...] Read more.
Many systemic (infective, genetic, autoimmune, neoplastic) diseases may involve the oral cavity and, more generally, the soft and hard tissues of the head and neck as primary or secondary localization. Primary onset in the oral cavity of both pediatric and adult diseases usually represents a true challenge for clinicians; their precocious detection is often difficult and requires a wide knowledge but surely results in the early diagnosis and therapy onset with an overall better prognosis and clinical outcomes. In the current paper, as for the topic of the current Special Issue, the authors present an overview on the most frequent clinical manifestations at the oral and maxillo-facial district of systemic disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases)
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10 pages, 321 KiB  
Review
Bruxism in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review
by Elisa Luconi, Lucrezia Togni, Marco Mascitti, Andrea Tesei, Alessandra Nori, Alberta Barlattani, Maurizio Procaccini and Andrea Santarelli
Medicina 2021, 57(3), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina57030224 - 1 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3411
Abstract
The role of bruxism in children and adolescents with Down syndrome, the most often diagnosed congenital syndrome, is still unclear. Therefore, this study aims to conduct a narrative review of the literature about bruxism in children and adolescents with Down syndrome to identify [...] Read more.
The role of bruxism in children and adolescents with Down syndrome, the most often diagnosed congenital syndrome, is still unclear. Therefore, this study aims to conduct a narrative review of the literature about bruxism in children and adolescents with Down syndrome to identify the prevalence, risk factors, and possible treatments of this disorder. Although an accurate estimate of its prevalence could not be inferred, it appears that bruxism is more prevalent in Down syndrome individuals rather than in the general pediatric population. No gender difference was observed, but a reduction in its prevalence was described with increasing age (around 12 years). The variability in the diagnostic techniques contributed to the heterogeneity of the literature data. Clinicopathological features of Down syndrome, such as muscle spasticity, oral breathing, and a predisposition to obstructive sleep apnea, may suggest a higher prevalence of bruxism in this patient group. Finally, given the paucity of studies on the management of bruxism in this population, it was not possible to outline a standard protocol for the non-invasive treatment of cases in which an observational approach is not sufficient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillo-Facial Manifestations of Systemic Diseases)
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