Advances in Spine and Spinal Cord Surgery

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2024) | Viewed by 2840

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shinjiro Kaneko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Spine and Spinal Cord Surgery, Fujita Health University, Toyoake 470-1192, Japan
Interests: spinal deformity; spinal cord injury; cervical spine diseases; lumbar spine diseases; thoracic spine diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We have observed great progress over the last decade in the field of treating spine and spinal cord diseases, such as adult spinal deformity (ASD).

For example, lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) became one of the new operative procedure options recently. LLIF has been widely used in the surgical treatment of ASD in recent years. There are various advantages to applying LLIF in the surgical treatment of ASD. Meanwhile, several new issues remain unsolved.

The main aim of this Special Issue of Medicina is to deliver new advances in the field of spine and spinal cord surgery.

This Special Issue is open to studies for surgical strategies, clinical outcomes, etiology, systematic reviews, etc.

We invite authors to submit articles related to all the topic of spine and spinal cord surgery.

We will consider original articles, review articles, technical notes, and case reports for publication.

Prof. Dr. Shinjiro Kaneko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spine and spinal cord diseases
  • spine and spinal cord surgery
  • adult spinal deformity
  • pediatric spinal deformity
  • cervical spine diseases
  • upper cervical spine diseases
  • lumbar spine diseases
  • thoracic spine diseases
  • spinal cord injury
  • spine and spinal cord tumor

Published Papers (2 papers)

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9 pages, 1226 KiB  
Case Report
Intradiscal Condoliase Injection Therapy for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation: Case Series and Literature Review
Medicina 2023, 59(9), 1561; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina59091561 - 28 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Background and objectives: Although chemonucleolysis with condoliase for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has become common, few reports have described its application in the treatment of recurrent LDH. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of condoliase treatment in six [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Although chemonucleolysis with condoliase for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has become common, few reports have described its application in the treatment of recurrent LDH. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of condoliase treatment in six patients with recurrent LDH and review the available literature on condoliase treatment for LDH. Materials and Methods: Six patients (four men and two women; mean age, 64.7 years) with recurrent LDH who were treated with condoliase at our hospital between 2019 and 2022 were included. The clinical records and images of the patients were retrospectively evaluated. In addition, the available English literature on condoliase treatment for LDH was retrieved and reviewed. Results: Among the six patients included in the study, three showed >50% improvement in leg pain after treatment, which is a lower efficacy rate than that in previous reports. In addition, two patients required surgery after treatment, which is a higher rate than that in previous reports. The mean intervertebral disc height significantly decreased from 8.4 mm before treatment to 6.9 mm after treatment, consistent with the results of previous studies. None of the cases showed Modic type I changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Although the efficacy of condoliase treatment for recurrent LDH may be lower than that for primary LDH, this treatment was found to be safe and applicable for recurrent LDH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Spine and Spinal Cord Surgery)
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7 pages, 21000 KiB  
Case Report
Stercoral Ulcer Presenting in a Patient with Cauda Equina Syndrome Secondary to Postoperative Epidural Hematoma
Medicina 2023, 59(7), 1331; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina59071331 - 19 Jul 2023
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Abstract
Chronic constipation can lead to fecal impaction in the large bowel, which can cause pressure necrosis followed by perforation, known as a stercoral ulcer. In extensive posterior thoracolumbar surgery, a long operation time, large blood loss, and perioperative narcotic use may aggravate constipation. [...] Read more.
Chronic constipation can lead to fecal impaction in the large bowel, which can cause pressure necrosis followed by perforation, known as a stercoral ulcer. In extensive posterior thoracolumbar surgery, a long operation time, large blood loss, and perioperative narcotic use may aggravate constipation. Moreover, sacral root palsy due to cauda equina syndrome (CES) can lead to the deterioration of fecal impaction. This report describes the case of a 77-year-old woman with CES who presented with saddle anesthesia, neurogenic bladder, bowel incontinence, and paraplegia. Five days prior, she had undergone extended posterior lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to L5. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extended epidural hematoma. After urgent neural decompression, she gradually recovered from the saddle anesthesia, leg pain, and paraplegia over 3 weeks. Thereafter, the patient suddenly developed massive hematochezia and hemorrhagic shock. Urgent colonoscopy was performed, and a stercoral ulcer in the sigmoid colon was diagnosed. After 4 weeks of intensive care for hemorrhagic shock, pneumonia, and systemic sepsis, the patient was transferred to a general ward for intensive rehabilitation. One year after the operation, she was able to walk with assistance, and her urinary and bowel incontinence completely recovered. Chronic constipation, a common clinical problem, can sometimes cause relatively obscure but potentially life-threatening complications such as stercoral ulceration. Possible factors including advanced age, extensive spinal surgeries, prolonged operation time, significant blood loss, perioperative narcotic use, and the presence of spinal cord injury might contribute to the development of this condition. It highlights the importance of recognizing the potential development of stercoral ulcers in patients with CES and emphasizes the need for prompt diagnosis and management to avert catastrophic complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Spine and Spinal Cord Surgery)
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