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Special Issue "Advancements in Performance of Steel and Metallic Materials in Civil Infrastructure"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2023 | Viewed by 3434

Special Issue Editors

Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
Interests: behavior of steel structures; design and evaluation of bridges; fatigue performance of metal structures; high performance steel; composite materials
Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
Interests: fatigue and fracture of metallic structures; field testing and monitoring; bridge design, fabrication, construction, and performance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The production, treatment, and fabrication of metallic materials, including but not limited to structural steels and aluminums, have experienced many advances resulting in enhanced performance in civil infrastructure applications. Notable examples of advancements include improved corrosion resistance of base materials and protection systems, more robust fracture toughness and fatigue resistance, improved isotropy in thick materials resulting in enhanced mechanical behavior, treatment processes, rapid joining processes, innovative methods of connection such as high-performance adhesives, and additive manufacturing. These have contributed to the development of infrastructure that is more efficient, longer-lasting, cost-effective, modular, resilient, and/or rapidly produced, fabricated, and erected. However, advances often come with associated challenges, and a better understanding of these materials and uses is necessary to take full advantage of their benefits. This Special Issue of Materials is aimed at providing a collection of papers focused on advancements in modern steel and metallic material production, treatment, selection, fabrication, and construction for civil infrastructure considering approaches such as material characterization and the evaluation of components and systems through experimental and/or analytical methods.

Dr. Caroline Bennett
Dr. William Collins
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion resistance
  • fracture toughness
  • fatigue resistance
  • high performance steel
  • metallic materials
  • additive manufacturing
  • advanced alloys
  • coatings
  • adhesives

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Dynamic Fracture and Crack Arrest Toughness Evaluation of High-Performance Steel Used in Highway Bridges
Materials 2023, 16(9), 3402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16093402 - 26 Apr 2023
Viewed by 717
Abstract
Impact energy tests are an efficient method of verifying adequate toughness of steel prior to it being put into service. Based on a multitude of historical correlations between impact energy and fracture toughness, minimum impact energy requirements that correspond to desired levels of [...] Read more.
Impact energy tests are an efficient method of verifying adequate toughness of steel prior to it being put into service. Based on a multitude of historical correlations between impact energy and fracture toughness, minimum impact energy requirements that correspond to desired levels of fracture toughness are prescribed by steel bridge design specifications. Research characterizing the fracture behavior of grade 485 and 690 (70 and 100) high-performance steel utilized impact, fracture toughness, and crack arrest testing to verify adequate performance for bridge applications. Fracture toughness results from both quasi-static and dynamic stress intensity rate tests were analyzed using the most recently adopted master curve methodology. Both impact and fracture toughness tests indicated performance significantly greater than the minimum required by material specifications. Even at the AASHTO Zone III service temperature, which is significantly colder than prescribed test temperatures, minimum average impact energy requirements were greatly exceeded. All master curve reference temperatures, both for quasi-static and dynamic loading rates, were found to be colder than the Zone III minimum service temperature. Three correlations between impact energy and fracture toughness were evaluated and found to estimate reference temperatures that are conservative by 12 to 50 °C (22 to 90 °F) on average for the grades and specimen types tested. The evaluation of two reference temperature shifts intended to account for the loading rate was also performed and the results are discussed. Full article
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Article
Impact of Particle Size Distribution in the Preform on Thermal Conductivity, Vickers Hardness and Tensile Strength of Copper-Infiltrated AISI H11 Tool Steel
Materials 2023, 16(7), 2659; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16072659 - 27 Mar 2023
Viewed by 869
Abstract
Spontaneous infiltration of a porous preform by a metallic melt provides the potential of generating metal matrix composites (MMCs) with tailored combinations of material properties at low cost. The bulk of tool inserts for injection molding must sustain high mechanical and thermal loads [...] Read more.
Spontaneous infiltration of a porous preform by a metallic melt provides the potential of generating metal matrix composites (MMCs) with tailored combinations of material properties at low cost. The bulk of tool inserts for injection molding must sustain high mechanical and thermal loads and simultaneously exhibit high thermal conductivity for efficient temperature control of the mold insert. To fulfill these contradictory requirements, AISI H11 tool steel preforms were infiltrated by liquid copper. The impact of the fine powder fraction (0 wt.% to 15 wt.%) blended to a coarse H11 powder in the preform on thermal conductivity, Vickers hardness and tensile strength was elucidated. The thermal conductivity of the composites could be enhanced by a factor of 1.84 (15 wt.% fine powder) and 2.67 (0 wt.% fine powder) with respect to the sintered H11 tool steel. By adding 15 wt.% fine powder to the coarse host powder, the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of the copper-infiltrated steel were 1066.3 ± 108.7 MPa and 366 ± 24 HV1, respectively, whereas the H11 tool steel yielded 1368.5 ± 89.3 MPa and 403 ± 17 HV1, respectively. Based on the results obtained, an appropriate particle size distribution (PSD) may be selected for preform preparation according with the requirements of a future mold insert. Full article
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Article
Reduced Slit Rolling Power in Rebar Steel Production
Materials 2023, 16(5), 2104; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16052104 - 05 Mar 2023
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Abstract
The rolling process of rebar steel production is one of the well established manufacturing processes; however, it should be subjected to revision and redesign for productivity enhancement and power reduction throughout the slit rolling process. In this work, slitting passes are extensively reviewed [...] Read more.
The rolling process of rebar steel production is one of the well established manufacturing processes; however, it should be subjected to revision and redesign for productivity enhancement and power reduction throughout the slit rolling process. In this work, slitting passes are extensively reviewed and modified for the attainment of better rolling stability and reduction in power consumption. The study has been applied for grade B400B-R Egyptian rebar steel, which is equivalent to steel grade ASTM A615M, Grade 40. Traditionally, the rolled strip in the rolling pass is edged before implementing a slitting pass using grooved rolls; this produces a single barreled strip. This single barrel form causes instability in the next slitting stand on the pressing by the slitting roll knife. Multiple industrial trials are attempted to achieve the deformation of the edging stand using a grooveless roll. As a result, a double barreled slab is produced. In parallel, finite element simulations of the edging pass are performed using grooved and grooveless rolls, and similar slab geometry with single and double barreled form are produced. In addition, further finite element simulations of the slitting stand are execute using idealized single barreled strips. The power calculated by the FE simulations of the single barreled strip is (245 kW), which is in acceptable agreement with the experimental observations in the industrial process (216 kW). This result validates the FE modeling parameters such as material model and boundary conditions. The FE modeling is extended to the slit rolling stand of a double barreled strip, which was previously produced by the grooveless edging rolls. It is found that the power consumption is (165 kW) 12% lower than the power consumed (185 kW) for slitting the single barreled strip. Full article
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