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Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Materials and Structures

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Materials Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2022) | Viewed by 4139

Special Issue Editors

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1H9, Canada
Interests: characterization of materials; micromechanics modelling; finite element modelling; functionally graded materials; smart materials and structures; composite materials; multifield behaviour; manufacturing engineering; structural integrity; thermoelasticity; electromagnetic materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jiye Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Technology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3AH, UK
Interests: composite materials; mechanics of materials, damage mechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More and more advanced materials and structures with sophisticated microstructures and functional features have been introduced in recent years due to the rapid development of advanced manufacturing technology. Applications of these advanced materials and structures are diverse, including those in aerospace, shipbuilding, automotive, environment, energy and biomedical engineering and many other industries.

As vital components, the failure of advanced materials and structures leads to catastrophic consequences for their applications. This Special Issue aims to provide a platform through which to showcase the most recent developments in modelling the damage and fracture of advanced materials and structures under various physical conditions. Research into the fracture and damage behavior of functionally graded materials, metamaterials and biomaterials under thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic and chemical loading is particularly welcome in this Special Issue. Fabrication and characterization of the deformation and failure of advanced materials and structures are also of particular interest.

Prof. Dr. Zengtao Chen
Dr. Jiye Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced materials and structures
  • additively manufactured materials
  • metamaterials
  • composite materials
  • biomaterials
  • functionally graded materials
  • fracture mechanics
  • damage mechanics
  • modelling and simulation
  • microstructure
  • numerical modelling
  • materials characterization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2072 KiB  
Article
Differential Analysis of Volumetric Strain Method Characterization in the Context of Phase Change of Water in Carbonate Rocks
Materials 2022, 15(1), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15010308 - 02 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1038
Abstract
Modernized technological processes or increasing demands on building materials force the scientific community to analyze in more detail the suitability of individual raw materials and deposits. New or modernized research methodologies make it possible to better understand not only the geometrical structure of [...] Read more.
Modernized technological processes or increasing demands on building materials force the scientific community to analyze in more detail the suitability of individual raw materials and deposits. New or modernized research methodologies make it possible to better understand not only the geometrical structure of the pore space of materials but also the processes taking place in them and the interaction of many factors at the same time. Despite the extensive literature in the field of research on capillary-porous materials, scientists still face many challenges because not everything is known. Carbonate rocks are the most common (one-tenth of Earth’s crust) sedimentary rocks. Analysis of the test results obtained with the use of the modernized differentia analysis of volumetric strain (DAVS) methodology allows for a better adjustment of rock deposits to the products that can be produced from them. In this manner, it is possible that it will contribute to a more rational use of exhaustible rock deposits and not only carbonate ones. This research subject is of great importance for modern science, which was also noted in many of science publications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Materials and Structures)
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37 pages, 16182 KiB  
Article
A Comparative Evaluation of Third-Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels for Automotive Forming and Crash Applications
Materials 2021, 14(17), 4970; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14174970 - 31 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
While the third generation of advanced high-strength steels (3rd Gen AHSS) have increasingly gained attention for automotive lightweighting, it remains unclear to what extent the developed methodologies for the conventional dual-phase (DP) steels are applicable to this new class of steels. The present [...] Read more.
While the third generation of advanced high-strength steels (3rd Gen AHSS) have increasingly gained attention for automotive lightweighting, it remains unclear to what extent the developed methodologies for the conventional dual-phase (DP) steels are applicable to this new class of steels. The present paper provides a comprehensive study on the constitutive, formability, tribology, and fracture behavior of three commercial 3rd Gen AHSS with an ultimate strength level ranging from 980 to 1180 MPa which are contrasted with two DP steels of the same strength levels and the 590R AHSS. The hardening response to large strain levels was determined experimentally using tensile and shear tests and then evaluated in 3D simulations of tensile tests. In general, the strain rate sensitivity of the two 3rd Gen 1180 AHSS was significantly different as one grade exhibited larger transformation-induced behavior. The in-plane formability of the three 1180 MPa steels was similar but with a stark contrast in the local formability whereas the opposite trend was observed for the 3rd Gen 980 and the DP980 steel. The forming limit curves could be accurately predicted using the experimentally measured hardening behavior and the deterministic modified Bressan–Williams through-thickness shear model or the linearized Modified Maximum Force Criterion. The resistance to sliding of the three 3rd Gen AHSS in the Twist Compression Test revealed a comparable coefficient of friction to the 590R except for the electro-galvanized 3rd Gen 1180 V1. An efficient experimental approach to fracture characterization for AHSS was developed that exploits tool contact and bending to obtain fracture strains on the surface of the specimen by suppressing necking. Miniature conical hole expansion, biaxial punch tests, and the VDA 238-100 bend test were performed to construct stress-state dependent fracture loci for use in forming and crash simulations. It is demonstrated that, the 3rd Gen 1180 V2 can potentially replace the DP980 steel in terms of both the global and local formability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modelling of Damage and Fracture in Materials and Structures)
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