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Advances in Composite Insulating Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymeric Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2023) | Viewed by 5104

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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
Interests: nanomaterials; nanocomposites; composite insulator; piezocatalysis; photocatalysis; polymer composites
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past two decades, the field of composite insulating materials has significantly developed through many valuable discoveries and improvements. This includes the improvement of their electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, expanding their application and indicating the possibility of electrical equipments’ further advancement.

Various types of composite materials, comprising either microscaled or nanoscaled inorganic particles, have found extensive application in power and high-voltage engineering. In particular, micro- and nanotechnologies represent new approaches towards improved insulation systems that can operate at higher electrical stress and in more hostile environments. Along with material performance, basic research and development of “advanced” materials in the field of polymer base composites are also pursuing energy-efficient and low-cost manufacturing routes in order to transform these new material concepts into marketable products.

This Special Issue will offer an overview of the latest developments in the field of composite insulating materials. The articles presented in this Special Issue will cover various topics, including, but not limited to: high-temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (HTV), room-temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (RTV), epoxy composite insulating materials, polymer composite insulating coatings, fiber-reinforced insulating material, polyolefin composite insulating material, polymer nanocomposite insulating material and so on. Papers may also consider the design, characterization, properties and applications of advanced composite insulating materials.

Prof. Dr. Pengfei Fang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • high temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (HTV)
  • room temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (RTV)
  • epoxy composite insulating materials
  • polymer composite insulating coatings
  • fiber-reinforced insulating material
  • polyolefin composite insulating material
  • polymer nanocomposite insulating material

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4659 KiB  
Article
Effect of NO2 Aging on the Surface Structure and Thermal Stability of Silicone Rubber with Varying Al(OH)3 Contents
by Jiapeng Fang, Yi Luo, Shilong Kuang, Kai Luo, Zikang Xiao, Xiangyang Peng, Zhen Huang, Zheng Wang and Pengfei Fang
Materials 2023, 16(6), 2540; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16062540 - 22 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1367
Abstract
In this study, silicone rubber (SiR) with 0, 90, and 180 parts of aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3, ATH) contents prepared in the laboratory was treated in a certain concentration of NO2 for 0, 12, 24, and 36 h. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy [...] Read more.
In this study, silicone rubber (SiR) with 0, 90, and 180 parts of aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3, ATH) contents prepared in the laboratory was treated in a certain concentration of NO2 for 0, 12, 24, and 36 h. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetry (TG) were used to study the changes in the surface structure and thermal stability of SiR, as well as the influence of Al(OH)3 on the properties of SiR. According to AFM, the root-mean-square roughness of ATH-90 SiR was 192 nm, which was 2.7 times of ATH-0 SiR. With the incorporation of ATH, the surface of SiR became more susceptible to corrosion by NO2. According to FT-IR and XPS, with the increase in aging time, the side chain Si-CH3 of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was oxidized gradually and a few of nitroso -NO2 groups were formed. According to TG, the incorporation of ATH caused the maximum decomposition rate temperature of PDMS to advance from 458.65 °C to 449.37 and 449.26 °C, which shows that the thermal stability of SiR degraded by adding ATH. After NO2 aging, a new decomposition stage appeared between 75 and 220 °C (stage Ⅰ), and this decomposition trend was similar to aluminum nitrate, which was proven to reduce the thermal stability of PDMS. The effects of NO2 on the surface structure and thermal stability of different ATH contents of silicone rubber were preliminarily clarified by a variety of characterization methods, which provided ideas for the development of silicone rubber resistant to NO2 aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Insulating Materials)
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15 pages, 4463 KiB  
Article
Study on NO2 Barrier Properties of RTV Silicone Rubber by Incorporation of Functional Graphene Oxide
by Zhen Huang, Jinshuai Zhang, Zheng Wang, Xiangyang Peng, Jiapeng Fang, Chunqing He and Pengfei Fang
Materials 2023, 16(5), 1982; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16051982 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1602
Abstract
In this study, functional graphene oxide (f-GO) nanosheets were prepared to enhance the NO2 resistibility of room-temperature-vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber. A nitrogen dioxide (NO2) accelerated aging experiment was designed to simulate the aging process of nitrogen oxide produced by corona [...] Read more.
In this study, functional graphene oxide (f-GO) nanosheets were prepared to enhance the NO2 resistibility of room-temperature-vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber. A nitrogen dioxide (NO2) accelerated aging experiment was designed to simulate the aging process of nitrogen oxide produced by corona discharge on a silicone rubber composite coating, and then electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to test the process of conductive medium penetration into silicone rubber. After exposure to the same concentration (115 mg·L−1) of NO2 for 24 h, at an optimal filler content of 0.3 wt.%, the impedance modulus of the composite silicone rubber sample was 1.8 × 107 Ω·cm2, which is an order of magnitude higher than that of pure RTV. In addition, with an increase in filler content, the porosity of the coating decreases. When the content of the nanosheet increases to 0.3 wt.%; the porosity reaches a minimum value 0.97 × 10−4%, which is 1/4 of the porosity of the pure RTV coating, indicating that this composite silicone rubber sample has the best resistance to NO2 aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Insulating Materials)
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13 pages, 5336 KiB  
Article
Piezoelectric Nanogenerator Based on Electrospinning PVDF/Cellulose Acetate Composite Membranes for Energy Harvesting
by Yuanyuan Li, Qing Hu, Rui Zhang, Wenmei Ma, Siwei Pan, Yaohong Zhao, Qing Wang and Pengfei Fang
Materials 2022, 15(19), 7026; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15197026 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2579
Abstract
The organic piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has attracted extensive research because of its excellent flexibility and mechanical energy-harvesting properties. Here, the electrospinning technique was taken to fabricate synthesized fiber membranes of a PVDF/cellulose acetate (CA) composite. The obtained PVDF/CA electrospun fiber membranes [...] Read more.
The organic piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has attracted extensive research because of its excellent flexibility and mechanical energy-harvesting properties. Here, the electrospinning technique was taken to fabricate synthesized fiber membranes of a PVDF/cellulose acetate (CA) composite. The obtained PVDF/CA electrospun fiber membranes (EFMs) were employed to prepare a flexible nanogenerator. XRD and FTIR spectroscopy revealed the enhancement of piezoelectric behavior due to an increase in β-phase in PVDF/CA EFMs compared with cast films. The PVDF/CA fibers (mass ratio of PVDF to CA = 9:1) showed an output voltage of 7.5 V and a short-circuit current of 2.1 μA under mechanical stress of 2 N and frequency of 1 Hz, which were 2.5 and two times greater than those of the pure PVDF fibers, respectively. By charging a 4.7 µF capacitor for 15 min with the voltage generated by the PVDF/CA EFMs, nine LED lamps could be lit. The work provides an effective approach to enhancing the piezoelectric effects of PVDF for low-power electronic loading of macromolecule polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Insulating Materials)
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15 pages, 3595 KiB  
Article
Influence of Crosslinking Extent on Free Volumes of Silicone Rubber and Water Diffusion after Corona Discharge
by Yue Yang, Zheng Wang, Xiangyang Peng, Zhen Huang and Pengfei Fang
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6833; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196833 - 1 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1418
Abstract
Silicone rubber is widely used as an insulating material. In this article, silicone rubber samples were prepared by varying the content of crosslinker (2,5-bis(tert-butyl-peroxy)-2,5-dimethylhexane, DBPMH), and the free volume holes in the samples were investigated by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) [...] Read more.
Silicone rubber is widely used as an insulating material. In this article, silicone rubber samples were prepared by varying the content of crosslinker (2,5-bis(tert-butyl-peroxy)-2,5-dimethylhexane, DBPMH), and the free volume holes in the samples were investigated by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurement. The surface chemical structure, surface micromorphology and water diffusion of the samples after corona discharge treatment were studied by FTIR, SEM and EIS measurements, respectively. As the crosslinker weight ratio increased from 0.2 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%, the mean free volume hole size first decreased and then remained unchanged. However, the concentration of free volume holes did not vary as the crosslinker weight ratio increased. SEM morphologies show that surface cracks were produced on samples having high crosslinking levels after corona treatment. The water diffusion coefficient of samples after corona treatment increased from 3.13 × 10−10 cm2 s−1 to 17.68 × 10−10 cm2 s−1 in the initial immersion period, as the crosslinker weight ratio increased from 0.2 wt.% to 3.0 wt.%. The results indicated that deterioration of samples with high crosslinking levels were more serious and water repellency more easily lost. The corona resistance ability of low crosslinking level silicone rubber stems from internal low molecular weight molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composite Insulating Materials)
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