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Biomaterials of Microbial Origin for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 8376

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. 3B’s Research Group, I3Bs—Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, Barco, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
2. ICVS/3B’s–PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, 4805-017 Guimarães, Portugal
Interests: nanobiomaterials; nanomedicine; theranostics; tissue engineering; bio 3D printing; 3D in vitro tissue models of disease
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, biomaterials of microbial origin have attracted a great deal of interest in the biomedical arena due to their unique properties, such as antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, biodegradability and processability, and biocompatibility. Interesting materials science endeavors have been exploring these biomaterials as artificial extracellular matrices (aECM) in in vitro models, and bioinks and scaffolds/implants for personalized tissue regeneration applications. This Special Issue, “Biomaterials of Microbial Origin for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications,” aims to overview the latest contributions and important research developments in the field. The topics are comprised of the following subjects: a) biomaterials synthesis, extraction, isolation, purification and advanced production protocols; b) functionalization strategies; c) conventional processing methods, and/or formulation of aECM, and bioinks for biofabrication, d) structural characterization and biological properties, e) biomaterials-function relationships, f) current and future prospects in a wide range of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, and g) creation of a wide variety of medical devices and challenges in the clinical translation. I kindly invite you to submit a manuscript(s) for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and concise reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Joaquim Miguel Oliveira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • hydrogels
  • microbial-origin
  • polysaccharides
  • tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 3934 KiB  
Article
Bacterial Polyglucuronic Acid/Alginate/Carbon Nanofibers Hydrogel Nanocomposite as a Potential Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering
by Zahra Ebrahimvand Dibazar, Mahnaz Mohammadpour, Hadi Samadian, Soheila Zare, Mehdi Azizi, Masoud Hamidi, Redouan Elboutachfaiti, Emmanuel Petit and Cédric Delattre
Materials 2022, 15(7), 2494; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072494 - 28 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2234
Abstract
3D nanocomposite scaffolds have attracted significant attention in bone tissue engineering applications. In the current study, we fabricated a 3D nanocomposite scaffold based on a bacterial polyglucuronic acid (PGU) and sodium alginate (Alg) composite with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as the bone tissue engineering [...] Read more.
3D nanocomposite scaffolds have attracted significant attention in bone tissue engineering applications. In the current study, we fabricated a 3D nanocomposite scaffold based on a bacterial polyglucuronic acid (PGU) and sodium alginate (Alg) composite with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as the bone tissue engineering scaffold. The CNFs were obtained from electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers through heat treatment. The fabricated CNFs were incorporated into a PGU/Alg polymeric solution, which was physically cross-linked using CaCl2 solution. The fabricated nanocomposites were characterized to evaluate the internal structure, porosity, swelling kinetics, hemocompatibility, and cytocompatibility. The characterizations indicated that the nanocomposites have a porous structure with interconnected pores architecture, proper water absorption, and retention characteristics. The in vitro studies revealed that the nanocomposites were hemocompatible with negligible hemolysis induction. The cell viability assessment showed that the nanocomposites were biocompatible and supported bone cell growth. These results indicated that the fabricated bacterial PGU/Alg/CNFs hydrogel nanocomposite exhibited appropriate properties and can be considered a new biomaterial for bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Full article
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Review

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29 pages, 2605 KiB  
Review
Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering: Production, Isolation, Characterization
by Dana-Maria Miu, Mihaela Carmen Eremia and Misu Moscovici
Materials 2022, 15(4), 1410; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15041410 - 14 Feb 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5144
Abstract
Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable and biocompatible biopolymers. These biomaterials have grown in importance in the fields of tissue engineering and tissue reconstruction for structural applications where tissue morphology is critical, such as bone, cartilage, blood vessels, and skin, among others. Furthermore, they can [...] Read more.
Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable and biocompatible biopolymers. These biomaterials have grown in importance in the fields of tissue engineering and tissue reconstruction for structural applications where tissue morphology is critical, such as bone, cartilage, blood vessels, and skin, among others. Furthermore, they can be used to accelerate the regeneration in combination with drugs, as drug delivery systems, thus reducing microbial infections. When cells are cultured under stress conditions, a wide variety of microorganisms produce them as a store of intracellular energy in the form of homo- and copolymers of [R]—hydroxyalkanoic acids, depending on the carbon source used for microorganism growth. This paper gives an overview of PHAs, their biosynthetic pathways, producing microorganisms, cultivation bioprocess, isolation, purification and characterization to obtain biomaterials with medical applications such as tissue engineering. Full article
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