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Advances in Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Materials Characterization

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Materials Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2023) | Viewed by 3489

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Photonics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan
2. School of Optoelectronic Engineering and Instrumentation Science, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: atomic spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; 2D materials; nonlinear optics; surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy
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Guest Editor
School of Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: coherent anti-stokes Raman; surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy; nonlinear optics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), an effective spectroscopy technique, has attracted considerable interest for its molecular fingerprint specificity and high sensitivity for structure detection of low concentration analytes. It significantly enhances the signal intensity of Raman scattering, and as an ultrasensitive optical tool. And, SERS has been widely applied in chemical and bioanalytical sensing, biochemical analysis, imaging applications, surface research, surface state of adsorption interface, interface orientation, and structural analysis of biological size molecules.

Common enhancement methods included metallic nanoparticles, nanoparticle arrays, and metallic films, which are based on local electromagnetic field enhancement caused by surface plasmon resonance method. Besides, there are some chemical enhancement methods, including non-resonance enhancement due to chemical bonding between the adsorbent and the metal substrate, resonance enhancement due to the formation of surface complexes by adsorbed molecules and surface adsorbed atoms and resonance-like enhancement of photoinduced charge transfer in molecular-metal systems by excited light. There are also some defects, which may be remedied or improved in future research process. The future directions include UV SERS, ultrafast and stimulated SERS, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and others works.

We believe this SI could gather some novel idea and research progress, develop the advanced SERS techniques and characterization research, and promote the communication of SERS and material characterization field.

Prof. Dr. Hsiang-Chen Chui
Prof. Dr. Rui Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Raman spectroscopy
  • surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy
  • 2D materials
  • nonlinear optical interaction
  • sensoring
  • biodetection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4692 KiB  
Article
Black Silicon: Breaking through the Everlasting Cost vs. Effectivity Trade-Off for SERS Substrates
by Lena Golubewa, Hamza Rehman, Yaraslau Padrez, Alexey Basharin, Sumit Sumit, Igor Timoshchenko, Renata Karpicz, Yuri Svirko and Polina Kuzhir
Materials 2023, 16(5), 1948; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16051948 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1683
Abstract
Black silicon (bSi) is a highly absorptive material in the UV-vis and NIR spectral range. Photon trapping ability makes noble metal plated bSi attractive for fabrication of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. By using a cost-effective room temperature reactive ion etching method, [...] Read more.
Black silicon (bSi) is a highly absorptive material in the UV-vis and NIR spectral range. Photon trapping ability makes noble metal plated bSi attractive for fabrication of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. By using a cost-effective room temperature reactive ion etching method, we designed and fabricated the bSi surface profile, which provides the maximum Raman signal enhancement under NIR excitation when a nanometrically-thin gold layer is deposited. The proposed bSi substrates are reliable, uniform, low cost and effective for SERS-based detection of analytes, making these materials essential for medicine, forensics and environmental monitoring. Numerical simulation revealed that painting bSi with a defected gold layer resulted in an increase in the plasmonic hot spots, and a substantial increase in the absorption cross-section in the NIR range. Full article
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9 pages, 3012 KiB  
Communication
The Wavelength-Dependent SERS Template Based on a Nanopillar Array
by Jiayi Li, Rui Li, Ying Xu, Xiaojun Xue, Xiaoming Chen and Hsiang-Chen Chui
Materials 2022, 15(21), 7446; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15217446 - 24 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1229
Abstract
Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be regarded as a powerful tool for probing chemical molecules by effectively enhancing Raman signals. However, the enhancement factors depend on the SERS template, the probed molecular structures, and the excitation laser wavelength. Herein, we proposed a simple [...] Read more.
Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be regarded as a powerful tool for probing chemical molecules by effectively enhancing Raman signals. However, the enhancement factors depend on the SERS template, the probed molecular structures, and the excitation laser wavelength. Herein, we proposed a simple and easily fabricated nanostructured template for SERS and analyzed the wavelength-dependent factors. Three types of golden nanopillar arrays on silicon wafers were designed and manufactured. The SERS signals of the Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules were extracted. Three laser sources, a blue 17 mW 458 nm diode laser, a green 20 mW 532 nm laser, and a red 6 mW 633 nm laser, were employed as the excitation laser sources. The 458 nm laser was located far from the resonate spectrum of R6G. The optical intensity distributions for the different SERS templates excited by three laser beams were also simulated. The enhancement factors (EFs) of R6G on the three nanostructured templates were measured and compared. The photoluminescence spectrum of the nanostructured templates and SERS signals of R6G were also measured. In addition, the experimental results concerned optical simulations. The analysis tool that was used was a convolution profile of multiple Lorentzian line shapes with a Gaussian profile. It is helpful to understand the SERS signals when the excitation laser wavelength is located out of the resonance region of molecules. It can also provide a new design approach to fabricate an SERS Template with a nanopillar array for different excitation wavelengths. Full article
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