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Plastic Deformation Behaviour in Steels during Metal Forming Processes

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2022) | Viewed by 2217

Special Issue Editors

Department of Applied Computer Science and Modelling, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Interests: metal forming; materials forming; multiscale modeling; discrete modeling techniques; finite element method; microstructure evolution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Applied Computer Science and Modelling, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow MP, Poland
Interests: thermomechanical processing; metal forming; incremental forming; high strain rate deformation; microstructure evolution

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Steel has been and still is the most commonly used construction material in many branches of the industry (e.g. building, automotive, mining, oil and gas). The recent drive for the development of “green steel” brings about new steel grades, e.g., complex phase steels that show Transformation-Induced Plasticity, Twinning Induced Plasticity effects or medium/high entropy steels. These modern materials are characterized by enhanced and unique properties, which are the result of complex, often multiphase microstructures providing (on condition that) their deformation behaviour is understood and fully controlled during metal forming processes. Also, sustainable development of the metal forming industry requires a redesign of existing technologies to take into account the environmental aspects, e.g., minimization of energy or/and introduction of circular economy aspects within the metal forming processes.

The scope of this special issue is focused on the understanding of the plastic deformation behaviour of steels in a wide range of metal forming processes. Papers on deformation behaviour of steel during hot/warm/cold bulk forming (rolling, forging, extrusion, drawing, etc.) and sheet forming are of particular focus. Studies on deformation behaviour during novel metal forming techniques (e.g., incremental forming, metal forming using explosives, electricity) as well as fundamental studies on formability and rheology assessment of steels using state-of-the-art characterization methods are welcome. The special issue also targets the green manufacturing aspects in metal forming.

 

Prof. Dr. Łukasz Madej

Dr. Krzysztof Muszka

Guest Editors

Keywords

  • plastic deformation
  • metal forming
  • green steel
  • steel plasticity
  • sheet forming
  • deformation behavior

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

29 pages, 35725 KiB  
Article
Multiscale Analogue Modelling of Clinching Process to Investigate Thickness Tolerance and Tool Misalignment
Materials 2022, 15(10), 3674; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15103674 - 20 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
NEED—The effect of dimensional variability of sheet thickness (tolerance) and tool misalignment is poorly understood for the clinching process. Finite element analysis (FEA) is valuable but requires a lot of and is difficult to verify in this situation due to the asymmetrical geometry [...] Read more.
NEED—The effect of dimensional variability of sheet thickness (tolerance) and tool misalignment is poorly understood for the clinching process. Finite element analysis (FEA) is valuable but requires a lot of and is difficult to verify in this situation due to the asymmetrical geometry and nonlinear plasticity. OBJECTIVE—The objective of this work was to determine the effect of thickness tolerance, tool misalignment and sheet placement (top vs. bottom) in the clinching process, by use of analogue modelling with plasticine. METHOD—Experiments used a scaled-up punch and die, with plasticine as the analogue. Thickness tolerances were represented by sheet thicknesses of 11 and 7 mm, 12 and 8 mm, 8 and 12 mm and 13 and 9 mm for upper and lower sheets, respectively. Two types of lubricant were tested between sheets: glycerine and silicone oil. Angular variability was also introduced. Measured parameters were interlock (also called undercut) and neck thickness. Analogue results for deformation were compared with microscopy of metal clinching. FINDINGS—The results reveal that the multiscale analogue model is an efficient tool for studying the effect of dimensional deviation on a clinch joint. Thickness tolerance showed a critical relationship with interlock, namely a reduction to about half that of the nominal, for both maximum and least material conditions. Increased angular misalignment also reduced the interlock. Compared with glycerine, silicone oil tests showed reduced interlock, possibly the result of a lower coefficient of friction. ORIGINALITY—This work demonstrates the usefulness of analogue modelling for exploring process variability in clinching. The results also show that significant effects for sheet placement are ductility, lubricant (friction), thickness of samples and tool misalignment. Full article
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