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Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 12411

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Department of Engineering Sciences, Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy
Interests: electro-recovery; electrodeposition coatings; energy and characterization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The continuous decrease in fossil resources and the current economic and geopolitical scenarios significantly affect the energy supply and promote the production of alternative fuels and energy systems which are more efficient and respectful of the environment. Therefore, a strong demand to produce renewable energy makes hydrogen a valid alternative energy vector for many hybrid energy systems. One of the main application fields for hydrogen, together with fuel cells, is the automotive sector. Over the last decade, there has been an important development in scientific and technological research to accelerate the transition towards a hydrogen-based energy economy. However, one of the main obstacles to diffusion and implementation of this technology is the hydrogen storage carried out by cryogenic processes or in pressurized tanks. Although these systems seem like an attractive option for hydrogen storage, energy and safety requirements represent serious concerns for automotive applications.

In this context, advanced materials capable of absorbing and desorbing hydrogen in a reversible way are gaining attention. For example, the hydrogen accumulation in hydrides, which presents notable features in terms of storage capacity (mass and volume), does not have safety concerns associated with pressure tanks, heat insulation, or the inevitable loss of the cryogenically stored hydrogen. Therefore, the purpose of this Special Issue is to collect and publish high-quality research papers and review articles addressing the study, synthesis, and characterization of advanced materials for reversible hydrogen storage.

Prof. Dr. Alessandro Dell'Era
Guest Editor

Erwin Ciro Zuleta
Guest Editor Assistant 

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Keywords

  • advanced materials
  • energy storage
  • hydrogen storage
  • hydrides
  • hydrogen absorption/desorption

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 4141 KiB  
Article
Enhancement of the Desorption Properties of LiAlH4 by the Addition of LaCoO3
by Noratiqah Sazelee, Nurul Amirah Ali, Mohammad Ismail, Sami-Ullah Rather, Hisham S. Bamufleh, Hesham Alhumade, Aqeel Ahmad Taimoor and Usman Saeed
Materials 2023, 16(11), 4056; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16114056 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
The high hydrogen storage capacity (10.5 wt.%) and release of hydrogen at a moderate temperature make LiAlH4 an appealing material for hydrogen storage. However, LiAlH4 suffers from slow kinetics and irreversibility. Hence, LaCoO3 was selected as an additive to defeat [...] Read more.
The high hydrogen storage capacity (10.5 wt.%) and release of hydrogen at a moderate temperature make LiAlH4 an appealing material for hydrogen storage. However, LiAlH4 suffers from slow kinetics and irreversibility. Hence, LaCoO3 was selected as an additive to defeat the slow kinetics problems of LiAlH4. For the irreversibility part, it still required high pressure to absorb hydrogen. Thus, this study focused on the reduction of the onset desorption temperature and the quickening of the desorption kinetics of LiAlH4. Here, we report the different weight percentages of LaCoO3 mixed with LiAlH4 using the ball-milling method. Interestingly, the addition of 10 wt.% of LaCoO3 resulted in a decrease in the desorption temperature to 70 °C for the first stage and 156 °C for the second stage. In addition, at 90 °C, LiAlH4 + 10 wt.% LaCoO3 can desorb 3.37 wt.% of H2 in 80 min, which is 10 times faster than the unsubstituted samples. The activation energies values for this composite are greatly reduced to 71 kJ/mol for the first stages and 95 kJ/mol for the second stages compared to milled LiAlH4 (107 kJ/mol and 120 kJ/mol for the first two stages, respectively). The enhancement of hydrogen desorption kinetics of LiAlH4 is attributed to the in situ formation of AlCo and La or La-containing species in the presence of LaCoO3, which resulted in a reduction of the onset desorption temperature and activation energies of LiAlH4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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31 pages, 16232 KiB  
Article
Thermodynamic Analysis of Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Energetics of Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier Systems Based on Methyl-Substituted Indoles
by Sergey V. Vostrikov, Artemiy A. Samarov, Vladimir V. Turovtsev, Peter Wasserscheid, Karsten Müller and Sergey P. Verevkin
Materials 2023, 16(7), 2924; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16072924 - 6 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1669
Abstract
Liquid organic hydrogen carriers can store hydrogen in a safe and dense form through covalent bonds. Hydrogen uptake and release are realized by catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, respectively. Indoles have been demonstrated to be interesting candidates for this task. The enthalpy of reaction [...] Read more.
Liquid organic hydrogen carriers can store hydrogen in a safe and dense form through covalent bonds. Hydrogen uptake and release are realized by catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, respectively. Indoles have been demonstrated to be interesting candidates for this task. The enthalpy of reaction is a crucial parameter in this regard as it determines not only the heat demand for hydrogen release, but also the reaction equilibrium at given conditions. In this work, a combination of experimental measurements, quantum chemical methods and a group-additivity approach has been applied to obtain a consistent dataset on the enthalpies of formation of different methylated indole derivatives and their hydrogenated counterparts. The results show a namable influence of the number and position of methyl groups on the enthalpy of reaction. The enthalpy of reaction of the overall hydrogenation reaction varies in the range of up to 18.2 kJ·mol−1 (corresponding to 4.6 kJ·mol(H2)−1). The widest range of enthalpy of reaction data for different methyl indoles has been observed for the last step (hydrogenation for the last double bond in the five-membered ring). Here a difference of up to 7.3 kJ·mol(H2)−1 between the highest and the lowest value was found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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14 pages, 4833 KiB  
Article
Effect of LaCoO3 Synthesized via Solid-State Method on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MgH2
by Noratiqah Sazelee, Muhamad Faiz Md Din, Mohammad Ismail, Sami-Ullah Rather, Hisham S. Bamufleh, Hesham Alhumade, Aqeel Ahmad Taimoor and Usman Saeed
Materials 2023, 16(6), 2449; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16062449 - 19 Mar 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 1643
Abstract
One of the ideal energy carriers for the future is hydrogen. It has a high energy density and is a source of clean energy. A crucial step in the development of the hydrogen economy is the safety and affordable storage of a large [...] Read more.
One of the ideal energy carriers for the future is hydrogen. It has a high energy density and is a source of clean energy. A crucial step in the development of the hydrogen economy is the safety and affordable storage of a large amount of hydrogen. Thus, owing to its large storage capacity, good reversibility, and low cost, Magnesium hydride (MgH2) was taken into consideration. Unfortunately, MgH2 has a high desorption temperature and slow ab/desorption kinetics. Using the ball milling technique, adding cobalt lanthanum oxide (LaCoO3) to MgH2 improves its hydrogen storage performance. The results show that adding 10 wt.% LaCoO3 relatively lowers the starting hydrogen release, compared with pure MgH2 and milled MgH2. On the other hand, faster ab/desorption after the introduction of 10 wt.% LaCoO3 could be observed when compared with milled MgH2 under the same circumstances. Besides this, the apparent activation energy for MgH2–10 wt.% LaCoO3 was greatly reduced when compared with that of milled MgH2. From the X-ray diffraction analysis, it could be shown that in-situ forms of MgO, CoO, and La2O3, produced from the reactions between MgH2 and LaCoO3, play a vital role in enhancing the properties of hydrogen storage of MgH2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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12 pages, 2899 KiB  
Article
Boosting the Dehydrogenation Properties of LiAlH4 by Addition of TiSiO4
by Nurul Yasmeen Yusnizam, Nurul Amirah Ali, Noratiqah Sazelee and Mohammad Ismail
Materials 2023, 16(6), 2178; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16062178 - 8 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1430
Abstract
Given its significant gravimetric hydrogen capacity advantage, lithium alanate (LiAlH4) is regarded as a suitable material for solid-state hydrogen storage. Nevertheless, its outrageous decomposition temperature and slow sorption kinetics hinder its application as a solid-state hydrogen storage material. This research’s objective [...] Read more.
Given its significant gravimetric hydrogen capacity advantage, lithium alanate (LiAlH4) is regarded as a suitable material for solid-state hydrogen storage. Nevertheless, its outrageous decomposition temperature and slow sorption kinetics hinder its application as a solid-state hydrogen storage material. This research’s objective is to investigate how the addition of titanium silicate (TiSiO4) altered the dehydrogenation behavior of LiAlH4. The LiAlH4–10 wt% TiSiO4 composite dehydrogenation temperatures were lowered to 92 °C (first-step reaction) and 128 °C (second-step reaction). According to dehydrogenation kinetic analysis, the TiSiO4-added LiAlH4 composite was able to liberate more hydrogen (about 6.0 wt%) than the undoped LiAlH4 composite (less than 1.0 wt%) at 90 °C for 2 h. After the addition of TiSiO4, the activation energies for hydrogen to liberate from LiAlH4 were lowered. Based on the Kissinger equation, the activation energies for hydrogen liberation for the two-step dehydrogenation of post-milled LiAlH4 were 103 and 115 kJ/mol, respectively. After milling LiAlH4 with 10 wt% TiSiO4, the activation energies were reduced to 68 and 77 kJ/mol, respectively. Additionally, the scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated that the LiAlH4 particles shrank and barely aggregated when 10 wt% of TiSiO4 was added. According to the X-ray diffraction results, TiSiO4 had a significant effect by lowering the decomposition temperature and increasing the rate of dehydrogenation of LiAlH4 via the new active species of AlTi and Si-containing that formed during the heating process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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16 pages, 4164 KiB  
Article
Ni0.6Zn0.4O Synthesised via a Solid-State Method for Promoting Hydrogen Sorption from MgH2
by Noratiqah Sazelee, Muhamad Faiz Md Din and Mohammad Ismail
Materials 2023, 16(6), 2176; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16062176 - 8 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1418
Abstract
Magnesium hydrides (MgH2) have drawn a lot of interest as a promising hydrogen storage material option due to their good reversibility and high hydrogen storage capacity (7.60 wt.%). However, the high hydrogen desorption temperature (more than 400 °C) and slow sorption [...] Read more.
Magnesium hydrides (MgH2) have drawn a lot of interest as a promising hydrogen storage material option due to their good reversibility and high hydrogen storage capacity (7.60 wt.%). However, the high hydrogen desorption temperature (more than 400 °C) and slow sorption kinetics of MgH2 are the main obstacles to its practical use. In this research, nickel zinc oxide (Ni0.6Zn0.4O) was synthesized via the solid-state method and doped into MgH2 to overcome the drawbacks of MgH2. The onset desorption temperature of the MgH2–10 wt.% Ni0.6Zn0.4O sample was reduced to 285 °C, 133 °C, and 56 °C lower than that of pure MgH2 and milled MgH2, respectively. Furthermore, at 250 °C, the MgH2–10 wt.% Ni0.6Zn0.4O sample could absorb 6.50 wt.% of H2 and desorbed 2.20 wt.% of H2 at 300 °C within 1 h. With the addition of 10 wt.% of Ni0.6Zn0.4O, the activation energy of MgH2 dropped from 133 kJ/mol to 97 kJ/mol. The morphology of the samples also demonstrated that the particle size is smaller compared with undoped samples. It is believed that in situ forms of NiO, ZnO, and MgO had good catalytic effects on MgH2, significantly reducing the activation energy and onset desorption temperature while improving the sorption kinetics of MgH2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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Review

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23 pages, 5394 KiB  
Review
Recent Developments in Materials for Physical Hydrogen Storage: A Review
by Thi Hoa Le, Minsoo P. Kim, Chan Ho Park and Quang Nhat Tran
Materials 2024, 17(3), 666; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17030666 - 29 Jan 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2286
Abstract
The depletion of reliable energy sources and the environmental and climatic repercussions of polluting energy sources have become global challenges. Hence, many countries have adopted various renewable energy sources including hydrogen. Hydrogen is a future energy carrier in the global energy system and [...] Read more.
The depletion of reliable energy sources and the environmental and climatic repercussions of polluting energy sources have become global challenges. Hence, many countries have adopted various renewable energy sources including hydrogen. Hydrogen is a future energy carrier in the global energy system and has the potential to produce zero carbon emissions. For the non-fossil energy sources, hydrogen and electricity are considered the dominant energy carriers for providing end-user services, because they can satisfy most of the consumer requirements. Hence, the development of both hydrogen production and storage is necessary to meet the standards of a “hydrogen economy”. The physical and chemical absorption of hydrogen in solid storage materials is a promising hydrogen storage method because of the high storage and transportation performance. In this paper, physical hydrogen storage materials such as hollow spheres, carbon-based materials, zeolites, and metal–organic frameworks are reviewed. We summarize and discuss the properties, hydrogen storage densities at different temperatures and pressures, and the fabrication and modification methods of these materials. The challenges associated with these physical hydrogen storage materials are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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25 pages, 8685 KiB  
Review
Predictive Modeling of Molecular Mechanisms in Hydrogen Production and Storage Materials
by Tanumoy Banerjee and Ganesh Balasubramanian
Materials 2023, 16(17), 6050; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16176050 - 3 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1411
Abstract
Hydrogen has been widely considered to hold promise for solving challenges associated with the increasing demand for green energy. While many chemical and biochemical processes produce molecular hydrogen as byproducts, electrochemical approaches using water electrolysis are considered to be a predominant method for [...] Read more.
Hydrogen has been widely considered to hold promise for solving challenges associated with the increasing demand for green energy. While many chemical and biochemical processes produce molecular hydrogen as byproducts, electrochemical approaches using water electrolysis are considered to be a predominant method for clean and green hydrogen production. We discuss the current state-of-the-art in molecular hydrogen production and storage and, more significantly, the increasing role of computational modeling in predictively designing and deriving insights for enhancing hydrogen storage efficiency in current and future materials of interest. One of the key takeaways of this review lies in the continued development and implementation of large-scale atomistic simulations to enable the use of designer electrolyzer–electrocatalysts operating under targeted thermophysical conditions for increasing green hydrogen production and improving hydrogen storage in advanced materials, with limited tradeoffs for storage efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Materials for Hydrogen Storage)
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