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Waste to Value – Use of Innovative Green Materials in the Construction of Transportation Infrastructure

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 4787

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Sport, Health and Engineering, Victoria University, Melbourne 3011, Australia
Interests: recycled materials in construction; pavement materials; geomechanics; pavement performance; transport infrastructure; green construction approaches
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Sport, Health and Engineering, Victoria University, Melbourne 3011, Australia
Interests: life cycle assesmsent; sustainable construction; life cycle cost analysis; green and sustainable materials; green and lean construction methods; green buildings and infrastructure; building information modelling; smart technologies use and digitization in construction; modern construction methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The construction sector is the most material-consuming industry and is significantly responsible for the depletion of natural resources, such as aggregate and oil mines. Identifying alternative materials to be used in the construction of civil infrastructure is, thus, an important step towards sustainability. Significant research has been undertaken to investigate the applicability of recycled materials in the construction of transport infrastructures, such as roads, embankments and associated structures. However, the provision of further robust evidence to convince authorities and industries for maximising the proportion of wastes/recycled materials in civil construction projects is still required. In this regard, in addition to performance testing, life cycle assessment and social procurement considerations on the use of  green materials are key areas of research focus.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for researchers to share their original research outcomes and to contribute to the outstanding collection of reviews and experimental, numerical and technical studies on green materials in transport infrastructure construction.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Pavement materials (asphalt, base, subbase) incorporating recycled materials;
  • Mechanical, stress–strain response, and durability of green pavement structures;
  • Improvement of natural subgrades using innovative techniques/materials;
  • Innovative and green construction technologies in infrastructure construction sector;
  • Green and innovative concrete technologies in infrastructure construction;
  • Life cycle assessment of green materials to facilitate sustainable decision making in transport infrastructure construction projects;
  • Factors affecting the market implementation and promotion of green materials in construction;
  • Drivers and barriers of circular economy and promotion of green and sustainable materials;
  • Benchmarking life cycle economic benefits to promote the commercial implementation of green materials;
  • Social procurement considerations and life cycle benefits of using green materials in construction projects.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Sustainability.

Dr. Ehsan Yaghoubi
Dr. Malindu Sandanayake
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastes
  • recycled materials
  • green pavements
  • ground improvement
  • road construction materials
  • life cycle assessment
  • circular economy
  • green concrete

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2835 KiB  
Article
Utilisation of Waste Sludge from Drinking Water Treatment as a Filler Material in Hot Mix Asphalt
by Tuna Eyüp Kahveci and Halit Özen
Materials 2024, 17(7), 1528; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17071528 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 410
Abstract
This research investigated the suitability of using sludge from the treatment of drinking water in hot mix asphalt (HMA) as a filler material. The storage and environmental impact of sludge is an enormous problem, especially for countries with large populations. Two different types [...] Read more.
This research investigated the suitability of using sludge from the treatment of drinking water in hot mix asphalt (HMA) as a filler material. The storage and environmental impact of sludge is an enormous problem, especially for countries with large populations. Two different types of sludges, ferric chloride (FC) and aluminium sulphate (AS), were used as a filler material in HMA. The Hamburg Wheel Tracking (HWT) test, which correlates with rutting, and the Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) test, which indicates the moisture sensitivity of HMA, were carried out at the optimum bitumen content of the mixes to investigate the usability of sludge in HMA. The test results indicate the usability of FC and AS in HMA compared to the reference mixes. However, the AS type of sludge has better rutting resistance than the FC type. Although the results support the usability of both sludges in HMA, it should be noted that the increased cost of the mix containing sludges due to the combustion process and the increased bitumen content during application should be considered. Full article
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19 pages, 15936 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Road Performance Study of Rubber–Diatomite Composite-Modified Asphalt Mixture
by Bo Tan, Youliang Su, Yuzhu Fan, Wanzhen Zhang and Qing Li
Materials 2023, 16(23), 7359; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16237359 - 26 Nov 2023
Viewed by 893
Abstract
To examine the effect mechanism of rubber and diatomite on asphalt as well as the performance of asphalt mixtures for road applications, various composite-modified asphalts are prepared using rubber and diatomite. The performance of modified asphalts with various proportions is analyzed, and the [...] Read more.
To examine the effect mechanism of rubber and diatomite on asphalt as well as the performance of asphalt mixtures for road applications, various composite-modified asphalts are prepared using rubber and diatomite. The performance of modified asphalts with various proportions is analyzed, and the optimal dosage ratio of modifiers is determined via the response surface approach. The microstructure of rubber–diatomite composite-modified asphalt is methodically examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The road performance, aging resistance, and long-term stability of asphalt mixtures are evaluated through Marshall tests, wheel tracking tests, aging wheel tracking tests, freeze–thaw splitting tests, and cyclic freeze–thaw drying aging splitting tests. The obtained results reveal that asphalt with 22% rubber and 4% diatomite exhibits the best overall performance. The composite-modified asphalt essentially demonstrates the physical blending between rubber powder, diatomite, and base asphalt. The asphalt built from them formed a uniform and stable overall structure. Compared with rubber asphalt and rubber–SBS composite-modified asphalt, rubber–diatomite composite-modified asphalt exhibits superior road performance, including better aging resistance and long-term water stability in asphalt mixtures. This study can promote the further extensive application of rubber–diatomite-modified asphalt in road engineering, while providing new ideas for cost-saving and environmentally friendly asphalt modification. Full article
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15 pages, 7442 KiB  
Article
Effect of Different Fine Aggregate Characteristics on Fracture Toughness and Microstructure of Sand Concrete
by Zhihua Sun, Jin Xiong, Shubo Cao, Jianxiong Zhu, Xuzhi Jia, Zhigang Hu and Kaiping Liu
Materials 2023, 16(5), 2080; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16052080 - 03 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1361
Abstract
The fracture toughness of sand concrete is affected by aggregate characteristics. In order to study the possibility of exploiting tailings sand, available in large quantities in sand concrete, and find an approach to improve the toughness of sand concrete by selecting appropriate fine [...] Read more.
The fracture toughness of sand concrete is affected by aggregate characteristics. In order to study the possibility of exploiting tailings sand, available in large quantities in sand concrete, and find an approach to improve the toughness of sand concrete by selecting appropriate fine aggregate. Three distinct fine aggregates have been used. After characterizing the fine aggregate used, the mechanical properties were tested to characterize the toughness of sand concrete, the box-counting fractal dimensions were calculated to analyze the roughness of fracture surfaces, and the microstructure was tested to observe the path and width of microcracks and hydration products in sand concrete. The results show that the mineral composition of fine aggregates is close, but their fineness modulus, fine aggregate angularity (FAA) and gradation vary considerably; FAA has a significant impact on the fracture toughness of sand concrete. The higher the FAA value, the more resistant it is to crack expansion; with the FAA values of from 32 s to 44 s, the microcrack width in sand concrete was reduced from 0.25 um to 0.14 um; The fracture toughness and microstructure of sand concrete are also related to the gradation of fine aggregates, the better gradation can improve the performance of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). The hydration products in the ITZ are also different because more reasonable gradation of aggregates reduces the voids between the fine aggregates and the cement paste and restrains the full growth of crystals. These results demonstrate that sand concrete has promising applications in the field of construction engineering. Full article
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15 pages, 3405 KiB  
Article
Thermal Characterizations of Waste Cardboard Kraft Fibres in the Context of Their Use as a Partial Cement Substitute within Concrete Composites
by Robert Haigh, Paul Joseph, Malindu Sandanayake, Yanni Bouras and Zora Vrcelj
Materials 2022, 15(24), 8964; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15248964 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1506
Abstract
The building and construction industry consumes a significant amount of virgin resources and minimizing the demand with alternative waste materials can provide a contemporary solution. In this study, thermal components of kraft fibres (KFs) derived from waste cardboard are investigated. The mechanical properties [...] Read more.
The building and construction industry consumes a significant amount of virgin resources and minimizing the demand with alternative waste materials can provide a contemporary solution. In this study, thermal components of kraft fibres (KFs) derived from waste cardboard are investigated. The mechanical properties containing KFs within concrete composites are evaluated. Metakaolin (MK) and KFs were integrated into concrete samples as a partial substitute for cement. Silica Fume (SF) was applied to the KF (SFKFs) with a view to enhancing the fibre durability. The results indicated that there was a reduction in compressive strength of 44 and 56% when 10% raw and modified KFs were integrated, respectively. Raw, fibre and matrix-modified samples demonstrated a 35, 4 and 24% flexural strength reduction, respectively; however, the tensile strength improved by 8% when the matrix was modified using MK and SFKF. The morphology of the fibres was illustrated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), with an energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provision and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) employed to gain insights into their chemical nature. The thermal, calorimetric and combustion attributes of the fibres were measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and pyrolysis combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC). SFKFs showed a lower heat release capacity (HRC), demonstrating a lower combustion propensity compared to raw KFs. Furthermore, the 45% decreased peak heat release rate (pHRR) of SFKFs highlighted the overall reduction in the fire hazards associated with these materials. TGA results also confirmed a lower mass weight loss of SFKFs at elevated temperatures, thus corroborating the results from the PCFC runs. Full article
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