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Green Textile Materials: Fibers, Processing and Applications

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 4918

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Natural Fibers and Medicinal Plants National Research Institute, Poznan, Poland
Interests: natural fibers; hemp; linen; green textiles; zero waste; sustainable technology; processing; pro-healthy textiles; bio-economy; circular bio-economy
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Guest Editor
Department of Textile Chemical Technologies, ŁUKASIEWICZ Research Network—Lodz Institute of Technology, Lodz, Poland
Interests: textile functionalization; surface modification; textile waste management; circular economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New approaches to textile materials, technologies and products are needed in face of problems appearing due to climate changes visible in the 21st century. Climate changes caused by greenhouse gas emissions have forced the necessity for the responsible development of new materials that have no strain on the environment. The textile industry is one of the biggest economic sectors in terms of waste production. The development of green materials to produce bio-based textiles with the use of sustainable technologies is a key challenge for textile researchers and scientists.

This Special Issue is focused on the exploration of new features of natural fibers and novel textile biomaterials produced from primary and secondary biomass for advanced applications. The scope of this Issue includes the development of new technological processes and the transition of conventional technologies into innovative bio-based ones, for example, finishing with the use of natural substrates like natural dyestuffs or functional herbal extracts which are friendly for humans and the environment. This Special Issue also covers research on bio-composites developed with the use of natural fibers, nanocellulose and bio-based polymer matrices to ensure the high diversification of composite use with the potential to replace synthetic plastics with biodegradable or recyclable ones. We welcome the submission of articles describing new waste management processes and the effective recycling of textile materials including bio-based nonwoven and composites in order to reach the zero-waste goal. 

Dr. Malgorzata Zimniewska
Dr. Malgorzata Cieslak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural fibers
  • bio-based fibers
  • sustainable technology
  • green design
  • bio-based textiles
  • high-performance functional textiles
  • natural dyeing
  • bio-based functionalization
  • bio-composites
  • process waste management
  • recycled textile materials
  • pro-healthy clothing
  • bio-based nonwoven
  • circular bioeconomy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 11926 KiB  
Article
The Quantity and Quality of Flax and Hemp Fibers Obtained Using the Osmotic, Water-, and Dew-Retting Processes
by Wanda Różańska, Barbara Romanowska and Szymon Rojewski
Materials 2023, 16(23), 7436; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16237436 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 774
Abstract
This study presents the quantity and quality of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) and hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) fibers obtained depending on the fiber extraction method. The extraction methods used in this study were osmotic degumming, dew retting, and water retting. The [...] Read more.
This study presents the quantity and quality of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) and hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) fibers obtained depending on the fiber extraction method. The extraction methods used in this study were osmotic degumming, dew retting, and water retting. The degummed straw was analyzed for fiber content, while the metrological, chemical, and physical properties were determined for the fibers obtained. It was shown that these properties change based on the method of fiber extraction used. The highest fiber content in the straw was obtained using the osmotic degumming method. These fibers are characterized by a light color, no unpleasant odor, low linear mass, good tenacity, lowest hygroscopicity, and reduced flammability compared to fibers obtained via the dew and water retting of straw. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Textile Materials: Fibers, Processing and Applications)
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16 pages, 12943 KiB  
Article
Development of a Layer Made of Natural Fibers to Improve the Ecological Performance of the Face Mask Type II
by Jerzy Mańkowski, Małgorzata Zimniewska, Weronika Gieparda, Barbara Romanowska, Anna Kicińska-Jakubowska, Jacek Kołodziej, Joanna Foksowicz-Flaczyk, Szymon Rojewski, Krzysztof Bujnowicz, Patrycja Przybylska, Edyta Kwiatkowska, MD Masud Alam, Wanda Różańska, Aleksandra Wawro and Elżbieta Hołderna-Kędzia
Materials 2023, 16(16), 5668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16165668 - 17 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1388
Abstract
The aim of this study was to develop a natural nonwoven layer made of cottonized bleached flax and cotton fibers which is suitable to replace one of the three polypropylene layers of face mask type II in order to reduce non-biodegradable waste production [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to develop a natural nonwoven layer made of cottonized bleached flax and cotton fibers which is suitable to replace one of the three polypropylene layers of face mask type II in order to reduce non-biodegradable waste production and limit the negative impact of used masks on the environment. The work focused on the design of a nonwoven structure based on properly blending cotton and flax fibers as well as ensuring the cover factor, which can support the mask’s barrier properties against air dust particles and does not make breathing difficult. Additionally, a biodegradable film was developed to connect the nonwoven layer with the other polypropylene filtering layers. The effectiveness of the biodeterioration of the flax/cotton nonwoven was evaluated based on a test of the susceptibility of materials to the action of soil microorganisms. The flax/cotton nonwoven layer was tested in terms of mechanical, physical, and biophysical properties, and an analysis of the covering of the nonwoven surface with fibers was conducted as well. The results confirmed that the structure of flax/cotton nonwovens is suitable to replace the nondegradable polypropylene layer of the face mask type II to improve its environmental performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Textile Materials: Fibers, Processing and Applications)
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20 pages, 3560 KiB  
Article
Dielectric Characterization of Fabric Aggregates around the 2.45 GHz ISM Band under Various Humidity, Density, and Temperature Conditions
by Rafael Pérez-Campos, Juan Monzó-Cabrera, José Fayos-Fernández, Alejandro Díaz-Morcillo, Antonio Martínez-González, Antonio José Lozano-Guerrero, Juan Luis Pedreño-Molina and Jose Antonio García-Gambín
Materials 2023, 16(12), 4428; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16124428 - 16 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1114
Abstract
Fabric permittivity is critical for the manufacturing of wearable sensors and antennas as well as predicting how fabrics interact with electromagnetic fields. Engineers should also understand how permittivity changes under different temperatures, densities, and moisture content values, or when several fabrics are mixed [...] Read more.
Fabric permittivity is critical for the manufacturing of wearable sensors and antennas as well as predicting how fabrics interact with electromagnetic fields. Engineers should also understand how permittivity changes under different temperatures, densities, and moisture content values, or when several fabrics are mixed in aggregates, when designing future applications such as microwave dryers. The permittivity of cotton, polyester, and polyamide fabric aggregates is investigated in this paper for a wide range of compositions, moisture content levels, density values, and temperature conditions around the 2.45 GHz ISM band using a bi-reentrant resonant cavity. The obtained results show extremely comparable responses for all characteristics investigated for single and binary fabric aggregates. Permittivity always increases as temperature, density, or moisture content levels rise. Moisture content is the most influential characteristic, causing enormous variations in the permittivity of aggregates. Fitting equations are supplied for all data, with exponential functions used to accurately model variation in temperature and polynomial functions employed to precisely model density and moisture content variations with low error levels. The temperature permittivity dependence of single fabrics without the influence of air gaps is also extracted from fabric and air aggregates by using complex refractive index equations for two-phase mixtures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Textile Materials: Fibers, Processing and Applications)
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14 pages, 39969 KiB  
Article
Effect of Drought Stress on Quality of Flax Fibres
by Edyta Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata Zimniewska, Patrycja Przybylska and Barbara Romanowska
Materials 2023, 16(10), 3752; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16103752 - 15 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1014
Abstract
Global warming has led to a change in climatic conditions. Since 2006, drought has contributed to a reduction of food production and other agriculture-based products in many countries. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has caused some changes in the composition [...] Read more.
Global warming has led to a change in climatic conditions. Since 2006, drought has contributed to a reduction of food production and other agriculture-based products in many countries. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has caused some changes in the composition of fruits and vegetables, making them less nutritious. To analyse this situation, a study was conducted on the effect of drought on the quality of fibres provided by the main fibre crops in Europe, namely flax (Linum usitatissimum). The experiment consisted of growing flax under controlled comparative conditions with designed different irrigation levels, such as 25%, 35% and 45% field soil moisture. Three varieties of flax were grown in 2019, 2020 and 2021 in the greenhouses of the Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants in Poland. Fibre parameters, such as linear density, length and strength, were evaluated according to relevant standards. In addition, scanning electron microscope images of the cross-section and longitudinal view of the fibres were analysed. The results of the study indicated that deficiency of water during the flax growing season resulted in lowering of fibre linear density and tenacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Textile Materials: Fibers, Processing and Applications)
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