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New Advances in Aluminum Alloys and Composites for Lightweight Applications

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 2120

Special Issue Editors

Department of Physics, Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Anantapur, AP, India
Interests: aluminum based composites; light alloys; processing; powder metallurgy; structure-property performance; wear; thermal analysis; simulation
Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Interests: light metal matrix composites; sustainable material processing; microstructural–mechanical property evaluation of materials; corrosion behavior of materials; biocompatibility of materials; syntactic foams; tribology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aluminum alloys and composites have gained widespread acceptance in industrial sectors like aerospace, automotive and space—specifically in weight-critical applications. In research, several different manufacturing approaches have been used to improve the properties of aluminum-based materials by means of alloying, composite technology, heat treatment, and coatings, among others. Using microstructural control, the overall properties of aluminum-based alloys and their composites have been improved by researchers around the world. Furthermore, the use of unique processing technologies such as additive manufacturing, sintering, extrusion, etc. has enabled the delivery of high-performance, lightweight aluminum-based materials. The combined effect of processing technology and novel alloying elements or reinforcements can be vital in elevating the gold standard of aluminum-based materials in industry.

Topics falling under the scope of the Special Issue include, among others:

    (a) Novel processing of aluminum-based materials;
    (b) Structure–property relationships in aluminum-based materials;
    (c) Additive manufacturing of aluminum-based materials;
    (d) Surface property characterization (corrosion, tribology, etc.) of aluminum-based materials;
    (e) Theoretical modelling and property prediction of aluminum-based materials.

Accordingly, this Special Issue aims to publish research articles focused on new advances in the preparation, characterization and modelling of novel aluminum-based materials. Review articles are also welcome.

Dr. Penchal Reddy Matli
Dr. Parande Gururaj
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • materials design
  • aluminum alloys and composites
  • additive manufacturing of aluminum alloys
  • microstructure evolution
  • advanced characterization
  • mechanical properties
  • wear and friction
  • corrosion and fatigue
  • elevated temperature behavior
  • theoretical modelling and prediction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 4927 KiB  
Article
A Novel Nickel-Plated Carbon Fiber Insert in Aluminum Joints with Thermoplastic ABS Polymer or Stainless Steel
Materials 2023, 16(17), 5777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16175777 - 23 Aug 2023
Viewed by 868
Abstract
New types of hybrid aluminum joints: Al-acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymer (CFRTP) designated Al/Ni-CFP/ABS, and Al-18-8 Stainless steel, Al/Ni-CFP/18-8, by Ni-plated carbon fiber plug (Ni-CFP) insert not before seen in the literature have been fabricated. [...] Read more.
New types of hybrid aluminum joints: Al-acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymer (CFRTP) designated Al/Ni-CFP/ABS, and Al-18-8 Stainless steel, Al/Ni-CFP/18-8, by Ni-plated carbon fiber plug (Ni-CFP) insert not before seen in the literature have been fabricated. The goal is to take advantage of extremely high ~6 mm CF surface area for high adhesion, to enhance the safety level of aircraft and other parts. This is without fasteners, chemical treatment, or glue. First, the CFP is plated with Ni. Second, the higher melting point half-length is spot welded to the CFP; and third, the remaining half-length is fabricated. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of Al/Ni-CFP/ABS was raised 15 times over that of Al/ABS. Normalized cUTS according to CFP cross-section by Rule of Mixtures for cAl/Ni-CFP/18-8 was raised over that of cAl/Ni-CFP/18-8 from 140 to 360 MPa. Resistance energy to tensile deformation, UT, was raised 12 times from Al/ABS to Al/Ni-CFP/ABS, and 6 times from Al/CFP/18-8 to Al/Ni-CFP/18-8. Spot welding allows rapid melting followed by rapid solidification for amorphous metal structures minimizing grain boundaries. The Ni-coating lowers or counters the effects of brittle Al4C3 and FexC formation at the interface and prevents damage by impingement to CFs, allowing joints to take on more of the load. Full article
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16 pages, 4547 KiB  
Article
Effect of Artificial Aging Treatment on the Mechanical Properties and Regulation of Precipitated Phase Particles of High-Pressure Die-Cast Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Longitudinal Carrier
Materials 2023, 16(12), 4369; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16124369 - 14 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 812
Abstract
This study investigates the artificial aging treatment process for AlSi10MnMg longitudinal carriers with optimal strength and ductility. Experimental results illustrate that the peak strength is observed under single-stage aging at 180 °C × 3 h, with a tensile strength of 332.5 MPa, Brinell [...] Read more.
This study investigates the artificial aging treatment process for AlSi10MnMg longitudinal carriers with optimal strength and ductility. Experimental results illustrate that the peak strength is observed under single-stage aging at 180 °C × 3 h, with a tensile strength of 332.5 MPa, Brinell hardness of 133.0 HB, and elongation of 5.56%. As aging time increases, tensile strength and hardness initially increase and then decrease, while elongation displays an inverse pattern. The amount of secondary phase particles at grain boundaries increases with aging temperature and holding time, but stabilizes as aging progresses; the secondary phase particles begin to grow, eventually weakening the alloy’s strengthening effect. The fracture surface exhibits mixed fracture characteristics, including ductile dimples and brittle cleavage steps. Range analysis indicates that the influence of distinct parameters on mechanical properties post-double-stage aging is as follows: first-stage aging time, first-stage aging temperature, followed again by second-stage aging time, and second-stage aging temperature. For peak strength, the optimal double-stage aging process includes a first-stage aging temperature of 100 °C × 3 h and a second-stage aging temperature of 180 °C × 3 h. Full article
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