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Exploring Innovative Sustainable Building Materials for a Greener Future

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 2063

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Tecnología de la Edificación, Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: construction and building materials; sustainability and circular economy; technological innovation in building; new measurement techniques applied to the building industry; energy efficiency
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the world grapples with the urgent need for sustainable development, the construction industry has a vital role to play in shaping a greener future. The demand for innovative sustainable building materials is steadily increasing, driven by the imperative to reduce environmental impact, enhance resource efficiency, and mitigate climate change.

This Special Issue (SI) intends to collect and expand on research in the field of sustainable building materials, delving into their characteristics, advantages, and potential applications. Thus, this SI aims to provide researchers, architects, engineers, and construction professionals with a holistic understanding of the currently available innovative options in terms of sustainable building materials for a greener future.

The Special Issue will include papers on the following research topics (non-exhaustive list):

  • Reused, recovered, and recycled materials.
  • Bio-based materials.
  • Advanced composites.
  • Environmental performance of building materials, considering their embodied energy, carbon footprint, and recyclability.
  • Possible detrimental effects of conventional construction materials on the environment, including high carbon emissions, depletion of natural resources, and waste generation.
  • Technical attributes of sustainable building materials, including their strength, durability, acoustic and thermal properties, and suitability for different construction applications.
  • Economic aspects of sustainable building materials, examining their cost-effectiveness, market availability, and scalability.
  • Circular materials for a circular economy and built environment.

This SI will be a valuable resource for decision makers and stakeholders in the construction sector, inspiring them to explore and adopt sustainable building materials in their pursuit of a more environmentally conscious and resilient built environment.

Dr. Paulo Santos
Dr. Daniel Ferrández Vega
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innovation
  • building materials
  • sustainability
  • environmental issues
  • social features
  • economic aspects
  • energy performance
  • thermal behavior
  • circularity
  • durability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 5749 KiB  
Article
Eco-Design and Characterization of Sustainable Lightweight Gypsum Composites for Panel Manufacturing including End-of-Life Tyre Wastes
by Daniel Ferrández, Manuel Álvarez, Alicia Zaragoza-Benzal and Paulo Santos
Materials 2024, 17(3), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17030635 - 28 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 849
Abstract
The incorporation of rubber recycled aggregates from end-of-life tyres (ELT) in the manufacturing process of sustainable building materials has gained great interest in recent decades as a result of the large volume of this waste being generated annually. In this work, the objective [...] Read more.
The incorporation of rubber recycled aggregates from end-of-life tyres (ELT) in the manufacturing process of sustainable building materials has gained great interest in recent decades as a result of the large volume of this waste being generated annually. In this work, the objective is to make a contribution towards the circularity of construction products by carrying out a physico-mechanical characterisation of new gypsum composites made with the incorporation of these recycled rubber aggregates. To this end, up to 30% by volume of the original raw material has been substituted, analysing the mechanical resistance to bending and compression. Although lower than those of traditional gypsum material, both properties exceed the limits set at 1 and 2 MPa, respectively, by the current regulations. In addition, water absorption by capillarity significantly decreases, and thermal conductivity is reduced by more than 35% with respect to the reference material. Finally, in order to provide the research with a practical application, a prefabricated plate design has been proposed that incorporates the gypsum materials studied and an agglomerated rubber band that increases the thermal resistance and improves the efficiency of the designed construction system. In this way, this research reflects the potential of these novel building materials and explores new avenues for their application in building construction. Full article
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15 pages, 2045 KiB  
Article
Carbon Dioxide Uptake Estimation for Spanish Cement-Based Materials
by Natalia Sanjuán, Pedro Mora, Miguel Ángel Sanjuán and Aniceto Zaragoza
Materials 2024, 17(2), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17020326 - 09 Jan 2024
Viewed by 702
Abstract
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change, has recently recognized the natural carbonation process as a way of carbon offsetting with mortar and concrete. Accordingly, this activity could be [...] Read more.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change, has recently recognized the natural carbonation process as a way of carbon offsetting with mortar and concrete. Accordingly, this activity could be recognized as a carbon removal process for which certification should be granted. The aim of the certification of carbon removal is to promote the development of adequate and efficient new carbon removal processes. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to provide reliable results on carbon dioxide uptake by cement-based materials in Spain. Yearly, greenhouse gas emissions are reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) by each country, and the natural carbonation should be added up to the carbon accounting. Therefore, natural carbonation should be included in the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, and such accounting information should be made available promptly to the national regulatory authorities. This paper provides the results of carbon dioxide uptake by Spanish cement-based materials from 1990 to 2020 by using an easy method of estimating the net carbon dioxide emissions (simplified method) considering the carbon dioxide released by the calcination during clinker production (process emissions). The outcome of this study reveals that there was 93,556,000 tons of carbon dioxide uptake by the mortar and concrete manufactured in Spain from 1990 to 2020. Full article
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