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Advances in Fiber-Reinforced Cementitious Composites for Concrete and Masonry Structures

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 11721

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Mechanics, Sound & Vibration Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
Interests: behavior of reinforced; prestressed concrete and steel structures; bridge engineering; engineering material; machine learning; method of finite elements; structural health assessment and monitoring
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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture Construction Conservation (DACC), Università IUAV di Venezia, 30123 Venice, Italy
Interests: behavior of masonry and reinforced concrete structures; fiber-reinforced cementitious composite; finite and discrete element methods; mixed variational formulations; structures on elastic supports

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Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Architecture Construction Conservation (DACC), Università IUAV di Venezia, 30123 Venice, Italy
Interests: behavior of masonry structures; natural fiber-reinforced cementitious composite; durability; method of finite elements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor Assistant
Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Parahyangan Catholic University, Bandung 40141, Indonesia
Interests: behavior of reinforced concrete structures; bridge engineering; earthquake-resistant design of steel and reinforced concrete structures; fiber-reinforced concrete; high performance concrete; prestressed concrete

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites for the design of buildings, bridges and infrastructures is a crucial topic because of their many advantages over other conventional materials. Fiber-reinforced cementitious composites were established in design codes. Their development is particularly important in the strengthening and repair of concrete and masonry structures. To this end, they have been combined with other materials. Researchers have combined several types and shapes of fiber within cementitious mixtures. Moreover, specific mixtures have been implemented to perform satisfactorily under intensive load conditions and environments.

The objective of this Special Issue is to gather research articles, case studies and review papers on the advances in fiber-reinforced cementitious composites for concrete and masonry structures. Original contributions are encouraged in order to provide a forum for scientists and industrial partners to discuss progress and future perspectives. It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a work and to share this call for papers with your colleagues. Contributions related to (but not limited to) the following topics are welcome:

  • Earthquake-resistant design of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites;
  • Life-cycle analysis and sustainability of masonry and concrete structures using fiber-reinforced cementitious composites;
  • Mechanical and chemical properties and the optimal mix design of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites, as well as their durability and long-term behavior;
  • Natural fiber-reinforced cementitious composites;
  • Novel fiber-reinforced cementitious composites;
  • Numerical modeling of masonry and concrete members made of fiber-reinforced cementitious composites, e.g., members subjected to extreme loading;
  • Relationship between fiber-reinforced cementitious composites and construction execution aspects.

Dr. Marco Bonopera
Dr. Daniele Baraldi
Guest Editors

Dr. Claudia Brito De Carvalho Bello
Dr. Wisena Perceka
Guest Editor Assistants

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • concrete
  • design
  • durability
  • earthquake
  • fiber-cementitious composite
  • masonry
  • material characterization
  • numerical modeling
  • strengthening
  • structural performance

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4423 KiB  
Article
Ductility Variation and Improvement of Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites in Structural Utilization
by Pinxin Diao, Zongyou Ling, Yunbo Bai, Weihua Lu and Yongxing Zhang
Materials 2024, 17(4), 831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17040831 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 452
Abstract
Strain-hardening cementitious composite (SHCC) has the obvious advantages of excellent material properties such as its high tensile and compressive strengths, high tensile strain capacity, and excellent durability against multi-cracking performance with very fine crack widths. In particular, the multi-cracking performance of SHCC during [...] Read more.
Strain-hardening cementitious composite (SHCC) has the obvious advantages of excellent material properties such as its high tensile and compressive strengths, high tensile strain capacity, and excellent durability against multi-cracking performance with very fine crack widths. In particular, the multi-cracking performance of SHCC during structural utilization is obviously reduced compared to that of SHCC in uniaxial tension tests using dumbbell-shaped specimens of small size. The corresponding tensile strain capacity of SHCC during structural utilization is, thus, significantly decreased compared to that of SHCC in uniaxial tension tests. However, the reduction in the ductility of SHCC during structural utilization has not been sufficiently understood, and further study is required. This paper presents an experimental investigation into the ductility variation of flexural-failed and shear-failed SHCC members as well as the ductility improvement of SHCC members with steel reinforcement compared with that of SHCC in uniaxial tension tests using small-sized specimens. This study focuses on not only the decrease in the crack elongation performance of the SHCC material during structural utilization but also the increase in the crack elongation performance of SHCC members with steel reinforcement. The results demonstrate that the crack elongation performance of flexural-failed and shear-failed SHCC members is significantly reduced compared to that of SHCC in the uniaxial tension tests. Moreover, it was confirmed that steel reinforcement can effectively improve the SHCC member, increasing the strain-hardening capacity and multi-cracking performance. The load-carrying capacity of the flexural-failed SHCC member with steel reinforcement seemed to increase linearly with an increase in the reinforcement ratio, accompanied by an increase in the distribution of multiple fine cracks in the flexural-failed SHCC member with steel reinforcement. Full article
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33 pages, 18857 KiB  
Article
Lower Carbon Footprint Concrete Using Recycled Carbon Fiber for Targeted Strength and Insulation
by Andrew Patchen, Stephen Young, Logan Goodbred, Stephen Puplampu, Vivek Chawla and Dayakar Penumadu
Materials 2023, 16(15), 5451; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16155451 - 03 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1639
Abstract
The production of concrete leads to substantial carbon emissions (~8%) and includes reinforcing steel which is prone to corrosion and durability issues. Carbon-fiber-reinforced concrete is attractive for structural applications due to its light weight, high modulus, high strength, low density, and resistance to [...] Read more.
The production of concrete leads to substantial carbon emissions (~8%) and includes reinforcing steel which is prone to corrosion and durability issues. Carbon-fiber-reinforced concrete is attractive for structural applications due to its light weight, high modulus, high strength, low density, and resistance to environmental degradation. Recycled/repurposed carbon fiber (rCF) is a promising alternative to traditional steel-fiber reinforcement for manufacturing lightweight and high-strength concrete. Additionally, rCF offers a sustainable, economical, and less energy-intensive solution for infrastructure applications. In this paper, structure–process–property relationships between the rheology of mix design, carbon fiber reinforcement type, thermal conductivity, and microstructural properties are investigated targeting strength and lighter weight using three types of concretes, namely, high-strength concrete, structural lightweight concrete, and ultra-lightweight concrete. The concrete mix designs were evaluated non-destructively using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography to investigate the microstructure of the voids and spatially correlate the porosity with the thermal conductivity properties and mechanical performance. Reinforced concrete structures with steel often suffer from durability issues due to corrosion. This paper presents advancements towards realizing concrete structures without steel reinforcement by providing required compression, adequate tension, flexural, and shear properties from recycled/repurposed carbon fibers and substantially reducing the carbon footprint for thermal and/or structural applications. Full article
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14 pages, 5099 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Fluidity and Strength of High-Early-Strength Cement-Based Repair Materials by Adding SB Latex and Wollastonite Mineral Fibers
by Yeon-Jae Choo, Jae-Hyuk Koo, Su-Jin Lee and Chan-Gi Park
Materials 2023, 16(15), 5239; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16155239 - 26 Jul 2023
Viewed by 624
Abstract
Concrete structures often fail to perform their original functions due to problems such as deterioration and damage over time. Therefore, various repair materials have been studied to maintain deteriorated concrete structures. This study experimentally investigated the mechanical properties of high-early-strength cement-based repair materials [...] Read more.
Concrete structures often fail to perform their original functions due to problems such as deterioration and damage over time. Therefore, various repair materials have been studied to maintain deteriorated concrete structures. This study experimentally investigated the mechanical properties of high-early-strength cement-based repair materials for spraying. For spraying, the cement-based materials should have adoptable fluidity and strength: 200 ± 100 mm for flow; 20 MPa at 24 h and 40 MPa at 28 days for compressive strength, and 8 MPa at 28 days for flexural strength. Wollastonite mineral fibers (3–5 wt.%) and styrene–butadiene (SB) latex (5–7 wt.%) were studied to enhance this requirement. Fluidity was evaluated by flow test and measuring the heat of hydration; mechanical properties were evaluated in terms of compressive and flexural strength. The cement-to-silica sand ratio (C:S ratio) was also applied differently to adjust the pot life of polymer cement-based material (1:1 and 1:1.5) as a binder. Because wollastonite mineral fibers and SB latex affect workability, the water-to-binder ratio was regulated to reach the target flow according to the amount of wollastonite mineral fibers and SB latex. Regardless of the C:S ratio, all studied mixtures met the target 28 day compressive strength at 24 h, decreasing in strength with increasing amounts of wollastonite mineral fibers and latex. Flexural strength also fulfilled the target value, and it increased with increasing amounts of wollastonite mineral fibers and latex, unlike compressive strength. The optimal mix proportion of high-early-strength cement-based repair materials constituted 3 wt.% wollastonite mineral fibers and 5 wt.% SB latex as the binder in a C:S ratio of 1:1.5. Full article
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13 pages, 3366 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Retrofitting Effect of Fiber-Reinforced Plastic and Steel Mesh Casting on Unreinforced Masonry Walls
by Faizan Halim, Afnan Ahmad, Mohammad Adil, Asad Khan, Mohamed Ghareeb, Majed Alzara, Sayed M. Eldin, Fahad Alsharari and Ahmed M. Yosri
Materials 2023, 16(1), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16010257 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1450
Abstract
Unreinforced masonry (URM) is one of the most popular construction materials around the world, but vulnerable during earthquakes. Due to its brittle nature, the URM structures may lead to a possible collapse of the wall of a building during earthquake events causing casualties. [...] Read more.
Unreinforced masonry (URM) is one of the most popular construction materials around the world, but vulnerable during earthquakes. Due to its brittle nature, the URM structures may lead to a possible collapse of the wall of a building during earthquake events causing casualties. In the current research, an attempt is made to enhance the seismic capacity of URM structures by proposing a new innovative composite material that can improve the shear strength and deformation capacity of the URM wall systems. The results revealed that the fiber-reinforced plastic having high tensile and shear stiffness can significantly increase in-plane as well as out-of-plane bending strength of the URM wall. It was recorded that the bending moment of the prism increased up to 549.5% by increasing the bending moment from 490 N*mm to 3183 N*mm per mm deflection of prism upon using glass fibers. Moreover, the ductility ratio amplified up to 5.73 times while the stiffness ratio increased up to 4.16 times with the aid of glass fibers. Since the material used in this research work is low cost, easily available, and no need for any skilled labor, which is economically good. Therefore, the URM walls retrofitted with fiber-reinforced plastic is an economical solution. Full article
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21 pages, 6903 KiB  
Article
The Prediction of Compressive Strength and Compressive Stress–Strain of Basalt Fiber Reinforced High-Performance Concrete Using Classical Programming and Logistic Map Algorithm
by Mohammad Hematibahar, Nikolai Ivanovich Vatin, Hayder Abbas Ashour Alaraza, Aghil Khalilavi and Makhmud Kharun
Materials 2022, 15(19), 6975; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15196975 - 08 Oct 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 1364
Abstract
In this research, the authors have developed an algorithm for predicting the compressive strength and compressive stress–strain curve of Basalt Fiber High-Performance Concrete (BFHPC), which is enhanced by a classical programming algorithm and Logistic Map. For this purpose, different percentages of basalt fiber [...] Read more.
In this research, the authors have developed an algorithm for predicting the compressive strength and compressive stress–strain curve of Basalt Fiber High-Performance Concrete (BFHPC), which is enhanced by a classical programming algorithm and Logistic Map. For this purpose, different percentages of basalt fiber from 0.6 to 1.8 are mixed with High-Performance Concrete with high-volume contact of cement, fine and coarse aggregate. Compressive strengths and compressive stress–strain curves are applied after 7-, 14-, and 28-day curing periods. To find the compressive strength and predict the compressive stress–strain curve, the Logistic Map algorithm was prepared through classical programming. The results of this study prove that the logistic map is able to predict the compressive strength and compressive stress–strain of BFHPC with high accuracy. In addition, various types of methods, such as Coefficient of Determination (R2), are applied to ensure the accuracy of the algorithm. For this purpose, the value of R2 was equal to 0.96, which showed that the algorithm is reliable for predicting compressive strength. Finally, it was concluded that The Logistic Map algorithm developed through classical programming could be used as an easy and reliable method to predict the compressive strength and compressive stress–strain of BFHPC. Full article
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23 pages, 8690 KiB  
Article
Glass Fibers Reinforced Concrete: Overview on Mechanical, Durability and Microstructure Analysis
by Jawad Ahmad, Roberto Alonso González-Lezcano, Ali Majdi, Nabil Ben Kahla, Ahmed Farouk Deifalla and Mohammed A. El-Shorbagy
Materials 2022, 15(15), 5111; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15155111 - 22 Jul 2022
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 5044
Abstract
Prior studies in the literature show promising results regarding the improvements in strength and durability of concrete upon incorporation of glass fibers into concrete formulations. However, the knowledge regarding glass fiber usage in concrete is scattered. Moreover, this makes it challenging to understand [...] Read more.
Prior studies in the literature show promising results regarding the improvements in strength and durability of concrete upon incorporation of glass fibers into concrete formulations. However, the knowledge regarding glass fiber usage in concrete is scattered. Moreover, this makes it challenging to understand the behavior of glass fiber-reinforced concrete. Therefore, a detailed review is required on glass fiber-reinforced concrete. This paper provides a compressive analysis of glass fiber-reinforced composites. All-important properties of concrete such as flowability, compressive, flexural, tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were presented in this review article. Furthermore, durability aspects such as chloride ion penetration, water absorption, ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and acid resistance were also considered. Finally, the bond strength of the fiber and cement paste was examined via scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that glass fibers improved concrete’s strength and durability but decreased the concrete’s flowability. Higher glass fiber doses slightly decreased the mechanical performance of concrete due to lack of workability. The typical optimum dose is recommended at 2.0%. However, a higher dose of plasticizer was recommended for a higher dose of glass fiber (beyond 2.0%). The review also identifies research gaps that should be addressed in future studies. Full article
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