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Advanced Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2024 | Viewed by 2490

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Guest Editor
Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow, Poland
Interests: solid oxide fuel cells; oxygen reduction reaction; corrosion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) show the highest efficiency among all energy-conversion devices and are attractive for energy storage by operating reversible modes. Decreasing the operational temperature of SOFCs would enable wider applications and increase the durability of the cell. However, lowering the temperature to a range that is safe from the point of view of material durability, called the intermediate temperature (IT) range (500–800 °C) or low-temperature range (350–500 °C), increases energy losses due to the slow electrode reactions, which is especially serious in the case of the cathode reaction.

This Special Issue is focused on topics including those listed below:

Describing new materials of perovskite structure for both cathodes and anodes for solid oxide fuel cells and proton conducting fuel cells, oxygen electrode materials for solid oxide electrolysis cells, reversible solid oxide cells, improving the performance of existing electrode materials by lowering the polarization resistance and enhancing the kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction or oxygen evolution reaction and describing their mechanism.

We seek high-quality works focusing on the latest advances in topics such as materials development; materials preparation methods; electrochemical methods devoted to the analysis of cathode and oxygen electrode reaction mechanisms as well as sources of energy losses; single-cell, stack, and hybrid systems; modelling and numerical analysis; and descriptions of degradation mechanisms. Submissions covering other topics will also be considered if they are relevant to the Special Issue theme.

Dr. Michał Mosiałek
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mixed oxides of perovskite structure
  • cathode materials solid oxide fuel cells
  • anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells
  • oxygen electrode materials
  • oxygen reduction reaction
  • solid oxide fuel cells
  • proton conducting fuel cells
  • solid oxide electrolysis cells, reversible solid oxide cells
  • material preparation methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3268 KiB  
Article
Mo-Doped LSCF as a Novel Coke-Resistant Anode for Biofuel-Fed SOFC
by Kimia Y. Javan, Massimiliano Lo Faro, Sebastian Vecino-Mantilla and Vincenzo M. Sglavo
Materials 2024, 17(4), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17040869 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 727
Abstract
Climate change and damage to the environment, as well as the limitations of fossil fuels, have pushed governments to explore infinite renewable energy options such as biofuels. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a sustainable energy device that transforms biofuels into power and [...] Read more.
Climate change and damage to the environment, as well as the limitations of fossil fuels, have pushed governments to explore infinite renewable energy options such as biofuels. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a sustainable energy device that transforms biofuels into power and heat. It is now being researched to function at intermediate temperatures (600–700 °C) in order to prevent material deterioration and improve system life span. However, one of the major disadvantages of reducing the temperature is that carbon deposition impairs the electrochemical performance of the cell with a Ni-YSZ traditional anode. Here, molybdenum was doped into La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3−δ (LSCFMo) as an innovative anode material with higher coke resistance and better phase stability under reducing conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed increasing phase stability by increasing the Mo dopant. Electrochemical measurements proved that the LSCFMo anode is an active catalyst towards the methanol oxidation even at low temperatures as 600 °C, with an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.55 V, while GDC10 (Ga0.9Ce0.1O1.95) is used as the electrolyte. As an insightful result, no trace of any carbon deposition was found on the anode side after the tests. The combination of phase composition, morphological, and electrochemical studies demonstrate that LSCFMo is a suitable anode material for SOFCs fed by biofuels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs))
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11 pages, 3075 KiB  
Article
Oxygen Vacancy and Valence Band Structure of Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe1−xCuxO3−δ (x = 0–0.15) with Enhanced ORR Activity for IT-SOFCs
by Taeheun Lim, Kanghee Jo and Heesoo Lee
Materials 2023, 16(8), 3231; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16083231 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1340
Abstract
The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of a Cu-doped Ba0.5Sr0.5FeO3−δ (Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe1−xCuxO3−δ, BSFCux, x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15) perovskite cathode was investigated in terms of oxygen vacancy formation [...] Read more.
The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of a Cu-doped Ba0.5Sr0.5FeO3−δ (Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe1−xCuxO3−δ, BSFCux, x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15) perovskite cathode was investigated in terms of oxygen vacancy formation and valence band structure. The BSFCux (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15) crystallized in a cubic perovskite structure (Pm3¯m). By thermogravimetric analysis and surface chemical analysis, it was confirmed that the concentration of oxygen vacancies in the lattice increased with Cu doping. The average oxidation state of B-site ions decreased from 3.583 (x = 0) to 3.210 (x = 0.15), and the valence band maximum shifted from −0.133 eV (x = 0) to −0.222 eV (x = 0.15). The electrical conductivity of BSFCux increased with temperature because of the thermally activated small polaron hopping mechanism showing a maximum value of 64.12 S cm−1 (x = 0.15) at 500 °C. The ASR value as an indicator of ORR activity decreased by 72.6% from 0.135 Ω cm2 (x = 0) to 0.037 Ω cm2 (x = 0.15) at 700 °C. The Cu doping increased oxygen vacancy concentration and electron concentration in the valence band to promote electron exchange with adsorbed oxygen, thereby improving ORR activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs))
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