materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering—2nd Edition

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 5055

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clothing Technology, Faculty of Textile Technology, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: clothing engineering; determining machine-hand sewing times; thermal performance of clothing; protective and smart clothing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clothing Technology, Faculty of Textile Technology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: intelligent clothing; joining technique of garment; development of measuring devices and systems; thermal properties of materials and clothing; process parameters in clothing engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the success of our first Special Issue "Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering", we decided to produce a second one to publish the latest research in the field of clothing and textile engineering.

This second Special Issue, similar to the first, covers a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) advanced materials for clothing and their properties, the design and computer construction of clothing, the process parameters of textile and clothing manufacturing, textile and clothing production, the principles and applications of joining techniques of clothing using thermal conduction and convection, ultrasonic and high-frequency techniques, wearable computers, conventional and protective clothing, smart textiles and clothing, textile and clothing engineering, and testing and measuring methods in textile and clothing engineering.

We look forward to receiving contributions from your research and knowledge on these new modern topics, as a multidisciplinary approach to these topics is important.

Prof. Dr. Snježana Firšt Rogale
Prof. Dr. Dubravko Rogale
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced materials
  • textile and garment production
  • advanced materials for clothing
  • design and construction of clothing
  • joining technique of clothing
  • properties of textile and clothing
  • wearable computer
  • smart textile and clothing

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

22 pages, 18585 KiB  
Article
Quality Assessment of Socks Produced from Viscose and Lyocell Fibers
by Antoneta Tomljenović, Juro Živičnjak and Zenun Skenderi
Materials 2024, 17(7), 1559; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17071559 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 458
Abstract
Most casual socks are produced from cotton and are usually combined with synthetic fibers. The suitability of viscose and lyocell fibers for knitting socks needs to be investigated further. Therefore, three series of plain socks were produced, composed in the largest content from [...] Read more.
Most casual socks are produced from cotton and are usually combined with synthetic fibers. The suitability of viscose and lyocell fibers for knitting socks needs to be investigated further. Therefore, three series of plain socks were produced, composed in the largest content from single-spun viscose or lyocell yarns fully plated with texturized polyamide 6.6 multifilament yarn. The quality of three types of main yarns manufactured by ring, open-end rotor, and air-jet spinning processes and two types of polyamide plating yarns used in the production of socks were assessed together with the structural, usage, and comfort quality of the socks before and after simulating household laundering. In comparison with cotton socks produced from ring-spun yarns under the same conditions, the results showed that viscose and lyocell socks have better moisture absorption and breathability, comparable dimensional stability, and lower abrasion resistance; lyocell socks have lower thermal resistance; and viscose socks are less prone to surface pilling after wet pretreatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering—2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3087 KiB  
Article
Influence of Undergarments on the Comfort Level of Scoliosis Brace Wearers
by Orsolya Nagy Szabó, Jelka Geršak, András Koleszár and Marianna Halász
Materials 2023, 16(17), 5925; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16175925 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Bracing has proven to be an effective method for the conventional treatment of scoliosis in young people. A brace, a therapeutic device, covers the upper body and promotes healing by applying pressure to specific areas. However, wearing a scoliosis brace negatively affects the [...] Read more.
Bracing has proven to be an effective method for the conventional treatment of scoliosis in young people. A brace, a therapeutic device, covers the upper body and promotes healing by applying pressure to specific areas. However, wearing a scoliosis brace negatively affects the user’s thermo-physiological well-being and often leads to discomfort. In this study, we investigated the influence of T-shirts as an undergarment on the thermo-physiological well-being of the brace wearer. For this purpose, we performed a comparative analysis of six T-shirts made from different special knitted fabrics. We carried out wearing tests in a computer-controlled climate chamber according to a predetermined protocol. The test subject wore the orthopedic brace over the different T-shirts at three different temperatures. The results indicate that the knitted fabrics of undergarments and environmental conditions considerably impact the wearer’s thermo-physiological comfort. In the tests, the T-shirts made from the selected functional fabrics performed very well. The T-shirt made from the classic cotton fabric containing elastane yarn also performed well and was the most environmentally friendly. Currently, due to its lower price and easier availability, this cotton T-shirt can be recommended for wearing under a scoliosis brace. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering—2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5638 KiB  
Article
Measurement Methods of the Thermal Resistance of Materials Used in Clothing
by Dubravko Rogale, Snježana Firšt Rogale, Željko Knezić, Nikolina Jukl and Goran Majstorović
Materials 2023, 16(10), 3842; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16103842 - 19 May 2023
Viewed by 1622
Abstract
This paper describes methods for evaluating the thermal properties of textile materials, clothing composites, and clothing using an integrated measurement system that includes a hot plate, a multi-purpose differential conductometer, a thermal manikin, a temperature gradient measurement device, and a device for measuring [...] Read more.
This paper describes methods for evaluating the thermal properties of textile materials, clothing composites, and clothing using an integrated measurement system that includes a hot plate, a multi-purpose differential conductometer, a thermal manikin, a temperature gradient measurement device, and a device for measuring the physiological parameters of the human body during the exact evaluation of garment thermal comfort. In practice, measurements were taken on four types of materials widely used in the production of conventional and protective clothing. The measurements were carried out using a hot plate and a multi-purpose differential conductometer, determining the thermal resistance of the material both in its uncompressed form and when a force was applied that was ten times greater than that needed to determine its thickness. Using a hot plate and a multi-purpose differential conductometer, thermal resistances of textile materials were assessed at different levels of material compression. On hot plates, both conduction and convection had an impact on thermal resistance, but in the multi-purpose differential conductometer, only conduction did. Moreover, a reduction in thermal resistance was observed as a result of compressing textile materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering—2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 909 KiB  
Review
Phenolic Compounds from By-Products for Functional Textiles
by Tiago Barros Afonso, Teresa Bonifácio-Lopes, Eduardo Manuel Costa and Manuela Estevez Pintado
Materials 2023, 16(22), 7248; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16227248 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1313
Abstract
Textile dyeing is known to have major environmental concerns, especially with the high use of toxic chemicals. The use of alternatives such as natural dyes rich in phenolic compounds has become extremely appealing in order to move towards a more sustainable circular economy. [...] Read more.
Textile dyeing is known to have major environmental concerns, especially with the high use of toxic chemicals. The use of alternatives such as natural dyes rich in phenolic compounds has become extremely appealing in order to move towards a more sustainable circular economy. Phenolic dyes have the potential to functionalize textile fabrics with properties such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and UV protection. Wastes/residues from the agri-food industries stand out as highly attractive sources of these compounds, with several by-products showing promising results in textile dyeing through the implementation of more sustainable and eco-friendly processes. This review presents an up-to-date exploration of the sources of phenolic compounds used in the textile industry over the past two decades, with a primary focus on the functional properties they provide to different fabrics. The research highlights a surge in interest in this theme since 2017, accentuating a noticeable upward trend. Throughout this review, emphasis is given to by-products from the agri-food industry as the sources of these compounds. The reviewed papers lay the foundation for future research, paving the way for exploring the potential of raw materials and by-products in the creation of functional and smart textiles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Clothing and Textile Engineering—2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop