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Recent Progress in Smart Magnetic Materials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Multifunctional Applications

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 2506

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Polímeros y Materiales Avanzados, Física, Química y Tecnología, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Leioa, Spain
Interests: magnetic materials and application; thin films; nanostructure magnetic materials; magnetic nano/microwires; magnetic materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; rare Earth transition alloys; hysteretic magnetic properties; self-assembly magnetic materials

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Polymers and Advanced Matererials, University Basque Country, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian, Spain
2. EHU Quantum Center, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Spain and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: magnetic materials and applications; amorphous nano-crystalline and granular magnetic materials; hysteretic magnetic properties; magnetic wires; transport properties (giant magneto-impedance effect, magneto-resistance); magnetic sensors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart magnetic materials have gained significant attention due to their unique magnetic properties and potential applications in various fields such as biomedicine, energy harvesting, data storage, and sensors. In recent years, there has been considerable progress in the synthesis and characterization of smart magnetic materials, leading to the development of multifunctional materials with enhanced properties.

One area of recent progress has been the synthesis of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles, which have a magnetic core surrounded by a shell that can provide additional functionality such as biocompatibility or catalytic activity. These materials can be used for targeted drug delivery or as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

Another area of progress is the development of magnetic shape memory alloys, which exhibit a shape memory effect under the influence of a magnetic field. These materials have potential applications in sensors, actuators, and energy-harvesting devices.

In terms of characterization, there has been a focus on using advanced techniques such as X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to understand the structure and properties of smart magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

Thus, in the family of soft magnetic materials, a glassy-like structure is essentially relevant for the realization of the unique combination of physical properties, such as excellent magnetic softness, and good mechanical and anti-corrosive properties. Such a glassy-like structure can be obtained if the quenching rate, achieved during the melt quenching, is high enough. The discovery of the giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect in amorphous soft magnetic materials makes them extremely attractive for a broad range of sensor applications.

Multifunctional applications of smart magnetic materials have also been explored, such as the development of magnetic nanocomposites for wastewater treatment, magnetic hyperthermia for cancer treatment, and magnetic refrigeration for energy-efficient cooling.

Overall, recent progress in smart magnetic materials has opened exciting possibilities for the development of new materials with enhanced properties and multifunctional applications.

This Special Issue will focus on the recent research progress on micro- and nanoscale magnetic materials prepared in different physical forms (micro- and nanowires, magnetic assembly, nanoparticles, nanostructured thin films and ribbons) and approaches towards the development of smart magnetic materials for multifunctional applications. Potential topics for this issue include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • Synthesis approaches;
  • Magnetic characterization;
  • Nano- and micro technologies;
  • Nano and microsensors;
  • Magnetic materials, micro- and nanowires.
  • 2D and 3D nanostructured thin films;
  • Magnetic assembly materials;
  • Magnetic ribbons and their advanced processing;
  • Magnetic sensor arrays and systems;
  • Novel and smart magnetic materials for sensor applications;
  • Smart composite materials with magnetic inclusions;
  • Amorphous and nanostructured magnetic materials;
  • Applications of smart magnetic materials.

Dr. Mohamed Salaheldeen
Prof. Dr. Arcady Zhukov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • 2D assembly magnetic materials
  • magnetic nanomaterials
  • characterization of magnetic nanomaterials
  • magnetic micro- and nanowires
  • smart materials and composites
  • nanostructured thin films
  • magnetic arrays
  • amorphous and nanocrystalline materials
  • magnetic biosensors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4844 KiB  
Article
Efficient Chlorostannate Modification of Magnetite Nanoparticles for Their Biofunctionalization
by Maria O. Zolotova, Sergey L. Znoyko, Alexey V. Orlov, Petr I. Nikitin and Artem V. Sinolits
Materials 2024, 17(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17020349 - 10 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 930
Abstract
Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are highly favored materials for a wide range of applications, from smart composite materials and biosensors to targeted drug delivery. These multifunctional applications typically require the biofunctional coating of MNPs that involves various conjugation techniques to form stable MNP–biomolecule complexes. [...] Read more.
Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are highly favored materials for a wide range of applications, from smart composite materials and biosensors to targeted drug delivery. These multifunctional applications typically require the biofunctional coating of MNPs that involves various conjugation techniques to form stable MNP–biomolecule complexes. In this study, a cost-effective method is developed for the chlorostannate modification of MNP surfaces that provides efficient one-step conjugation with biomolecules. The proposed method was validated using MNPs obtained via an optimized co-precipitation technique that included the use of degassed water, argon atmosphere, and the pre-filtering of FeCl2 and FeCl3 solutions followed by MNP surface modification using stannous chloride. The resulting chlorostannated nanoparticles were comprehensively characterized, and their efficiency was compared with both carboxylate-modified and unmodified MNPs. The biorecognition performance of MNPs was verified via magnetic immunochromatography. Mouse monoclonal antibodies to folic acid served as model biomolecules conjugated with the MNP to produce nanobioconjugates, while folic acid–gelatin conjugates were immobilized on the test lines of immunochromatography lateral flow test strips. The specific trapping of the obtained nanobioconjugates via antibody–antigen interactions was registered via the highly sensitive magnetic particle quantification technique. The developed chlorostannate modification of MNPs is a versatile, rapid, and convenient tool for creating multifunctional nanobioconjugates with applications that span in vitro diagnostics, magnetic separation, and potential in vivo uses. Full article
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16 pages, 2362 KiB  
Article
Carbon-Doped Co2MnSi Heusler Alloy Microwires with Improved Thermal Characteristics of Magnetization for Multifunctional Applications
by Mohamed Salaheldeen, Asma Wederni, Mihail Ipatov, Valentina Zhukova and Arcady Zhukov
Materials 2023, 16(15), 5333; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16155333 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1020
Abstract
In the current work, we illustrate the effect of adding a small amount of carbon to very common Co2MnSi Heusler alloy-based glass-coated microwires. A significant change in the magnetic and structure structural properties was observed for the new alloy Co2 [...] Read more.
In the current work, we illustrate the effect of adding a small amount of carbon to very common Co2MnSi Heusler alloy-based glass-coated microwires. A significant change in the magnetic and structure structural properties was observed for the new alloy Co2MnSiC compared to the Co2MnSi alloy. Magneto-structural investigations were performed to clarify the main physical parameters, i.e., structural and magnetic parameters, at a wide range of measuring temperatures. The XRD analysis illustrated the well-defined crystalline structure with average grain size (Dg = 29.16 nm) and a uniform cubic structure with A2 type compared to the mixed L21 and B2 cubic structures for Co2MnSi-based glass-coated microwires. The magnetic behavior was investigated at a temperature range of 5 to 300 K and under an applied external magnetic field (50 Oe to 20 kOe). The thermomagnetic behavior of Co2MnSiC glass-coated microwires shows a perfectly stable behavior for a temperature range from 300 K to 5 K. By studying the field cooling (FC) and field heating (FH) magnetization curves at a wide range of applied external magnetic fields, we detected a critical magnetic field (H = 1 kOe) where FC and FH curves have a stable magnetic behavior for the Co2MnSiC sample; such stability was not found in the Co2MnSi sample. We proposed a phenomenal expression to estimate the magnetization thermal stability, ΔM (%), of FC and FH magnetization curves, and the maximum value was detected at the critical magnetic field where ΔM (%) ≈ 98%. The promising magnetic stability of Co2MnSiC glass-coated microwires with temperature is due to the changing of the microstructure induced by the addition of carbon, as the A2-type structure shows a unique stability in response to variation in the temperature and the external magnetic field. In addition, a unique internal mechanical stress was induced during the fabrication process and played a role in controlling magnetic behavior with the temperature and external magnetic field. The obtained results make Co2MnSiC a promising candidate for magnetic sensing devices based on Heusler glass-coated microwires. Full article
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