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Advances in Analysis and Performance of Reinforced Concrete Structures

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 2900

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Civil Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, China
Interests: concrete structure; strain hardening cementitious composites; strengthening; refined numerical analysis; tunnel concrete lining; underground structure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to announce this Special Issue of Materials, which will focus on the analysis and performance of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. As we all known, RC structures have been widely used in all the area of civil engineering, which are built for meeting the diversified functional requirements in the varied engineering industries. More recently, the performance of RC structures applied in the extreme condition has been intensively investigated and aroused great interest among the researchers, targeting the application in the harsh environment, which can significantly improve the advances in concrete structures. However, the performance of RC structures has not yet been understood clearly until now, and the in-depth study is required.

This Special Issue aims to provide a platform for the discussion of analysis and performance of RC structures used in all the area of civil engineering, including not only building engineering but also transport infrastructure as well as special engineering. Theoretical analysis of RC structure Numerical analysis of RC structure Performance of RC and structure in building engineering Performance of RC structure in transport infrastructure Performance of RC structure in special engineering Behavior of RC structure in extreme condition or harsh environment.

Prof. Dr. Yongxing Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reinforced concrete structures
  • UHPC structure
  • analysis
  • performance
  • building engineering
  • infrastructure engineering
  • underground engineering
  • special engineering.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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26 pages, 6296 KiB  
Article
Benchmarking Standard and Micromechanical Models for Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete Relevant for Nuclear Power Plants
by Vít Šmilauer, Lenka Dohnalová, Milan Jirásek, Julien Sanahuja, Suresh Seetharam and Saeid Babaei
Materials 2023, 16(20), 6751; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16206751 - 18 Oct 2023
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Abstract
The creep and shrinkage of concrete play important roles for many nuclear power plant (NPP) and engineering structures. This paper benchmarks the standard and micromechanical models using a revamped and appended Northwestern University database of laboratory creep and shrinkage data with 4663 data [...] Read more.
The creep and shrinkage of concrete play important roles for many nuclear power plant (NPP) and engineering structures. This paper benchmarks the standard and micromechanical models using a revamped and appended Northwestern University database of laboratory creep and shrinkage data with 4663 data sets. The benchmarking takes into account relevant concretes and conditions for NPPs using 781 plausible data sets and 1417 problematic data sets, which cover together 47% of the experimental data sets in the database. The B3, B4, and EC2 models were compared using the coefficient of variation of error (CoV) adjusted for the same significance for short-term and long-term measurements. The B4 model shows the lowest variations for autogenous shrinkage and basic and total creep, while the EC2 model performs slightly better for drying and total shrinkage. In addition, confidence levels at 5, 10, 90, and 95% are quantified in every decade. Two micromechanical models, Vi(CA)2T and SCK CEN, use continuum micromechanics for the mean field homogenization and thermodynamics of the water–pore structure interaction. Validations are carried out for the 28-day Young’s modulus of concrete, basic creep compliance, and drying shrinkage of paste and concrete. The Vi(CA)2T model is the second best model for the 28-day Young’s modulus and the basic creep problematic data sets. The SCK CEN micromechanical model provides good prediction for drying shrinkage. Full article
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23 pages, 9013 KiB  
Article
Concrete Cover Cracking and Reinforcement Corrosion Behavior in Concrete with New-to-Old Concrete Interfaces
by Juhui Zhang, Jing Li, Yuchuan Zhao, Shikun Wang and Zhongguo Guan
Materials 2023, 16(17), 5969; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16175969 - 31 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 642
Abstract
In reinforced concrete (RC) structures, new-to-old concrete interfaces are widely present due to precast splices, repairs, and construction joints. In this paper, both monolithic and segmental specimens were fabricated with five kinds of water–cement ratios, including ordinary and high-strength concrete. The impressed current-accelerated [...] Read more.
In reinforced concrete (RC) structures, new-to-old concrete interfaces are widely present due to precast splices, repairs, and construction joints. In this paper, both monolithic and segmental specimens were fabricated with five kinds of water–cement ratios, including ordinary and high-strength concrete. The impressed current-accelerated corrosion test was used, and the degree of reinforcement corrosion was controlled by Faraday’s Law. In the accelerated corrosion process, the concrete surface cracking, steel corrosion, and mechanical properties of the corroded steels in the segmental specimens were investigated and compared with monolithic specimens considering the pouring method, concrete strength, and the strength difference between new and old concrete. The prediction of concrete cracking time was also discussed. The results indicated that, for the monolithic specimens, longitudinal cracks could be observed on the ordinary concrete surface, while no cracks were produced on a high-strength concrete surface; only the rust leaked out at the ends. For the segmental specimens, both longitudinal and transverse cracks were produced on an ordinary concrete surface, while only transverse cracks were produced at the high-strength new-to-old concrete interfaces. The steel embedded in the segmental specimens suffered more sectional loss at the new-to-old concrete interfaces. An influence coefficient based on the section loss of the rebar was proposed to evaluate the influence of interfaces on the rust uniformity of rebars. When there were differences in strength between new and old concrete, the influence of the interface on the uniformity of steel bar cross-section loss slightly increased. Based on available theoretical analysis for uniform corrosion, the concrete cracking time of the monolithic specimens was predicted, which was basically consistent with experimental phenomena. However, further research is needed to predict the service life of segmental specimens with new-to-old concrete interfaces. Full article
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23 pages, 8815 KiB  
Article
Study on In-Plane Initial Rotational Stiffness of Eccentric RHS Beam-Column Joints
by Xiaonong Guo, Weixin Li and Zeyu Xv
Materials 2023, 16(14), 5103; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16145103 - 20 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1096
Abstract
The eccentric RHS (rectangular hollow sections) joint offers improved mechanical properties and better space utilization. Its use in frame structures has gained significant attention. Currently, the initial rotational stiffness of RHS joints, the simplified finite element analysis method of eccentric RHS joints, and [...] Read more.
The eccentric RHS (rectangular hollow sections) joint offers improved mechanical properties and better space utilization. Its use in frame structures has gained significant attention. Currently, the initial rotational stiffness of RHS joints, the simplified finite element analysis method of eccentric RHS joints, and the influence of the spatial effect of RHS joints are still unknown. The purpose of this research is to establish a calculation formula for the initial rotational stiffness of eccentric RHS joints, study the influence of the spatial effect under complex stress conditions, and propose a mathematical model that can be used to simplify the analysis of eccentric RHS joints. The research findings indicate that the web plate’s deformation stiffness primarily influences the joints’ initial rotational stiffness. This increases with a higher beam-to-column depth-to-width ratio, beam-to-column thickness ratio, and column width-to-thickness ratio. The form of the moment distribution in the joint changes, and begins to have a significant effect on the rotational stiffness when the beam-to-column flange width ratio reaches and exceeds 0.7. The stiffeners have a direct additive effect on the joint stiffness. The influence of adjacent beams on the joint is minimal, and the spatial effect of the joint can be disregarded. Furthermore, the finite element analysis confirmed the accuracy of the power function model in accurately simulating the static load behavior of the joint, particularly the bending moment–angle relationship. Full article
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