Special Issue "Application of Spectroscopic Techniques in Marine Natural Products"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2021) | Viewed by 8327

Special Issue Editor

School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, and Center for Biodiscovery, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
Interests: marine invertebrate natural products; bioactive natural products; structure determinination of new metabolites; isolation and purification; chemical analysis; analytical chemistry of natural compounds and xenochemicals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past 40 years, the marine environment has become a valuable reservoir of new pharmaceutical drug leads as a result of the identification of new and unprecedented natural products from numerous phyla, geographic locations, depths, etc. The biodiscovery of new marine-derived, natural product drugs relies on several key areas of technology, including separation science and cell, molecular and chemical biology.

Another key technology is spectroscopy. Instrumental analysis to screen for, and subsequently identify, natural product structures using spectroscopic and spectrometric tools satisfies this need. Advances in spectroscopic techniques, data processing and database design are reported constantly, with applications of these advances in marine natural products chemistry following soon thereafter. This Special Issue of Marine Drugs welcomes all submissions relating to marine natural products chemistry, with a focus on recent developments in spectroscopic techniques and their application to the identification of marine-derived drugs. The use of any form of spectroscopy and/or spectrometry falls within the scope of this issue, and both research articles and reviews would be welcome. If your marine natural products research has utilized advances in spectroscopic techniques, I hope you will consider publishing this work in this Special Issue of Marine Drugs.

Dr. Rob Keyzers
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spectroscopy
  • spectrometry
  • NMR
  • MS
  • IR
  • UV–vis
  • ECD
  • VCD
  • metabolomics
  • structure elucidation
  • screening

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 3218 KiB  
Article
Neuronal Modulators from the Coral-Associated Fungi Aspergillus candidus
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050281 - 19 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
Three new p-terphenyl derivatives, named 4″-O-methyl-prenylterphenyllin B (1) and phenylcandilide A and B (17 and 18), and three new indole-diterpene alkaloids, asperindoles E–G (22-24), were isolated together with eighteen known analogues from [...] Read more.
Three new p-terphenyl derivatives, named 4″-O-methyl-prenylterphenyllin B (1) and phenylcandilide A and B (17 and 18), and three new indole-diterpene alkaloids, asperindoles E–G (22-24), were isolated together with eighteen known analogues from the fungi Aspergillus candidus associated with the South China Sea gorgonian Junceela fragillis. The structures and absolute configurations of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, and DFT/NMR and TDDFT/ECD calculations. In a primary cultured cortical neuronal network, the compounds 6, 9, 14, 17, 18 and 24 modulated spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and 4-aminopyridine hyperexcited neuronal activity. A preliminary structure–activity relationship was discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Spectroscopic Techniques in Marine Natural Products)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 3330 KiB  
Article
Probing the Anti-Cancer Potency of Sulfated Galactans on Cholangiocarcinoma Cells Using Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy, Molecular Docking, and In Vitro Studies
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050258 - 30 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2181
Abstract
Sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from red alga Gracilaria fisheri have been reported to inhibit the growth of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells, which was similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted drug, cetuximab. Herein, we studied the anti-cancer potency of SG compared to cetuximab. [...] Read more.
Sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from red alga Gracilaria fisheri have been reported to inhibit the growth of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells, which was similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted drug, cetuximab. Herein, we studied the anti-cancer potency of SG compared to cetuximab. Biological studies demonstrated SG and cetuximab had similar inhibition mechanisms in CCA cells by down-regulating EGFR/ERK pathway, and the combined treatment induced a greater inhibition effect. The molecular docking study revealed that SG binds to the dimerization domain of EGFR, and this was confirmed by dimerization assay, which showed that SG inhibited ligand-induced EGFR dimer formation. Synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy was employed to examine alterations in cellular macromolecules after drug treatment. The SR-FTIR-MS elicited similar spectral signatures of SG and cetuximab, pointing towards the bands of RNA/DNA, lipids, and amide I vibrations, which were inconsistent with the changes of signaling proteins in CCA cells after drug treatment. Thus, this study demonstrates the underlined anti-cancer mechanism of SG by interfering with EGFR dimerization. In addition, we reveal that FTIR signature spectra offer a useful tool for screening anti-cancer drugs’ effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Spectroscopic Techniques in Marine Natural Products)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

29 pages, 5402 KiB  
Article
Complementary Analytical Platforms of NMR Spectroscopy and LCMS Analysis in the Metabolite Profiling of Isochrysis galbana
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(3), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19030139 - 02 Mar 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3254
Abstract
This study was designed to profile the metabolites of Isochrysis galbana, an indigenous and less explored microalgae species. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) were used to establish the metabolite profiles of five different extracts of [...] Read more.
This study was designed to profile the metabolites of Isochrysis galbana, an indigenous and less explored microalgae species. 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) were used to establish the metabolite profiles of five different extracts of this microalga, which are hexane (Hex), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), absolute ethanol (EtOH), EtOH:water 1:1 (AqE), and 100% water (Aq). Partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS–DA) of the generated profiles revealed that EtOAc and Aq extracts contain a diverse range of metabolites as compared to the other extracts with a total of twenty-one metabolites, comprising carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and amino acids, that were putatively identified from the NMR spectra. Meanwhile, thirty-two metabolites were successfully annotated from the LCMS/MS data, ten of which (palmitic acid, oleic acid, α-linolenic acid, arachidic acid, cholesterol, DHA, DPA, fucoxanthin, astaxanthin, and pheophytin) were similar to those present in the NMR profile. Another eleven glycerophospholipids were discovered using MS/MS-based molecular network (MN) platform. The results of this study, besides providing a better understanding of I.galbana’s chemical make-up, will be of importance in exploring this species potential as a feed ingredient in the aquaculture industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Spectroscopic Techniques in Marine Natural Products)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop