Marine Natural Products and Neglected Tropical Diseases

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 8241

Special Issue Editors

Departamento de Obstetricia, Ginecología, Pediatría, Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública, Toxicología, Medicina Legal y Forense y Parasitología, Instituto Universitario de Enfermedades Tropicales y Salud Pública de Canarias, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofísico F. Sánchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Interests: Parasite; chemotherapy; Leishmania; Trypanosoma; Free living amoeba; water quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Departamento de Obstetricia, Ginecología, Pediatría, Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública, Toxicología, Medicina Legal y Forense y Parasitología, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avda. Astrofísico F. Sánchez, 2, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Interests: free living amoebae; therapeutics; emerging parasitic protozoa; diagnosis; natural compounds; synthetic compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a great variety of microorganisms, including of parasitic protozoan, bacterial, fungal, and viral origin, capable of producing diseases in humans, such as the organisms of the genera Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Mycobacterium and human cytomegalovirus and hepatitis B virus. These organisms produce diseases that affect millions of people and that are listed by the WHO, mostly, as neglected tropical diseases. The treatments against these organisms, in many cases, are not effective due to resistance or toxicity phenomena of the molecules used. There is, therefore, an important limitation in terms of the therapeutic arsenal available to deal with these pathologies.

The oceans, and marine organisms, have been widely used to obtain natural products as a source for the treatment of different pathologies, and recent studies have shown that marine products are an important source of novel structures with significant antimicrobial, antiviral, and antiprotozoal activity.

The objective of this Special Issue of Marine Drugs is to publish studies on new molecules with biological activity, covering aspects of the activity and mechanisms of action on these organisms.

Dr. Jose E. Piñero
Dr. Jacob Lorenzo-Morales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural product
  • biological activity
  • Trypanosoma
  • Leishmania
  • Plasmodium
  • amoeba
  • Mycobacterium
  • bacteria
  • fungi
  • virus

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1169 KiB  
Article
Algal-Derived Halogenated Sesquiterpenes from Laurencia dendroidea as Lead Compounds in Schistosomiasis Environmental Control
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(2), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20020111 - 29 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2377
Abstract
Schistosomiasis has been controlled for more than 40 years with a single drug, praziquantel, and only one molluscicide, niclosamide, raising concern of the possibility of the emergence of resistant strains. However, the molecular targets for both agents are thus far unknown. Consequently, the [...] Read more.
Schistosomiasis has been controlled for more than 40 years with a single drug, praziquantel, and only one molluscicide, niclosamide, raising concern of the possibility of the emergence of resistant strains. However, the molecular targets for both agents are thus far unknown. Consequently, the search for lead compounds from natural sources has been encouraged due to their diverse structure and function. Our search for natural compounds with potential use in schistosomiasis control led to the identification of an algal species, Laurencia dendroidea, whose extracts demonstrated significant activity toward both Schistosoma mansoni parasites and their intermediate host snails Biomphalaria glabrata. In the present study, three seaweed-derived halogenated sesquiterpenes, (−)-elatol, rogiolol, and obtusol are proposed as potential lead compounds for the development of anthelminthic drugs for the treatment of and pesticides for the environmental control of schistosomiasis. The three compounds were screened for their antischistosomal and molluscicidal activities. The screening revealed that rogiolol exhibits significant activity toward the survival of adult worms, and that all three compounds showed activity against S. mansoni cercariae and B. glabrata embryos. Biomonitored fractioning of L. dendroidea extracts indicated elatol as the most active compound toward cercariae larvae and snail embryos. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products and Neglected Tropical Diseases)
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16 pages, 1934 KiB  
Article
The Prospective Use of Brazilian Marine Macroalgae in Schistosomiasis Control
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050234 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2345
Abstract
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects more than 250 million people. The treatment is limited to praziquantel and the control of the intermediate host with the highly toxic molluscicidal niclosamide. Marine algae are a poorly explored and promising alternative that can provide [...] Read more.
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects more than 250 million people. The treatment is limited to praziquantel and the control of the intermediate host with the highly toxic molluscicidal niclosamide. Marine algae are a poorly explored and promising alternative that can provide lead compounds, and the use of multivariate analysis could contribute to quicker discovery. As part of our search for new natural compounds with which to control schistosomiasis, we screened 45 crude extracts obtained from 37 Brazilian seaweed species for their molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata embryos and schistosomicidal activities against Schistosoma mansoni. Two sets of extracts were taxonomically grouped for metabolomic analysis. The extracts were analyzed by GC–MS, and the data were subjected to Pattern Hunter and Pearson correlation tests. Overall, 22 species (60%) showed activity in at least one of the two models. Multivariate analysis pointed towards 3 hits against B. glabrata veliger embryos in the Laurencia/Laurenciella set, 5 hits against B. glabrata blastula embryos, and 31 against S. mansoni in the Ochrophyta set. Preliminary annotations suggested some compounds such as triquinane alcohols, prenylated guaianes, dichotomanes, and xenianes. Despite the putative identification, this work presents potential candidates and can guide future isolation and identification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products and Neglected Tropical Diseases)
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Review

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26 pages, 17466 KiB  
Review
Metabolites from Marine Sponges and Their Potential to Treat Malarial Protozoan Parasites Infection: A Systematic Review
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(3), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19030134 - 28 Feb 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2476
Abstract
Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the Plasmodium genus through the bite of female Anopheles mosquitoes, affecting 228 million people and causing 415 thousand deaths in 2018. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the most recommended treatment for malaria; however, [...] Read more.
Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the Plasmodium genus through the bite of female Anopheles mosquitoes, affecting 228 million people and causing 415 thousand deaths in 2018. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the most recommended treatment for malaria; however, the emergence of multidrug resistance has unfortunately limited their effects and challenged the field. In this context, the ocean and its rich biodiversity have emerged as a very promising resource of bioactive compounds and secondary metabolites from different marine organisms. This systematic review of the literature focuses on the advances achieved in the search for new antimalarials from marine sponges, which are ancient organisms that developed defense mechanisms in a hostile environment. The principal inclusion criterion for analysis was articles with compounds with IC50 below 10 µM or 10 µg/mL against P. falciparum culture. The secondary metabolites identified include alkaloids, terpenoids, polyketides endoperoxides and glycosphingolipids. The structural features of active compounds selected in this review may be an interesting scaffold to inspire synthetic development of new antimalarials for selectively targeting parasite cell metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products and Neglected Tropical Diseases)
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