Marine Natural Products from Bacteria

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 2405

Special Issue Editors

Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea
Interests: NMR spectroscopy; structure elucidation; natural products chemistry; actinomycetology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Collegel of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si, Republic of Korea
Interests: natural product chemistry; natural product isolation; natural product drug discovery; chromatography; bioactivity; extraction; NMR structure elucidation; phytochemical analysis; high-performance liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Natural products have long been a significant inspiration for drug discovery due to their various chemical structures and therapeutic applications. While a large proportion of reported natural compounds have come from pharmacological plants and terrestrial microorganisms for a long time, marine microorganisms have only attracted the attention of the scientists as a new resource of natural origin of bioactive molecules in the past few decades. Extreme ecological conditions such as the lack of light and variable pressure, salinity and temperature account for the rich biodiversity of marine microhabitats. Thus, natural bioactive products discovered from marine bacteria belong to a diverse range of structural classes, which promotes marine bacteria as a promising candidate source for the discovery of novel drugs. Furthermore, marine bacteria produce not only unique structural skeletons and unprecedented bioactive compounds, but also distinct molecules which are not observed in terrestrial bacteria. Additionally, various biosynthetic pathways relating to cryptic genes and unique enzymes in marine bacteria have been suggested by the uncommon molecular scaffolds of metabolites such as depsipeptides, lipopeptides and polyketides. For this reason, metabolites of aquatic bacterial origin are a gold mine for researchers in organic chemistry, medicinal chemistry and pharmacology to “exploit”. This Special Issue aims to underline the latest investigations on natural products and drug discovery from bacterial sources in marine environments, especially chemical molecules possessing unusual structures and unexpected bioactivities. Outstanding original research articles as well as critical reviews on these topics from research groups over the world are welcomed. I cordially invite researchers in all fields of science dealing with bacterial natural products to contribute their work to this Special Issue, which will provide readers of Marine Drugs with the most recent discoveries in the exploration of marine bacterial molecules.

Dr. Kyuho Moon
Dr. Hyukjae Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine bacteria
  • discovery of secondary metabolites
  • marine natural products
  • structural determination
  • bioactive metabolites
  • marine ecosystem
  • natural product chemistry
  • chemical biology

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 4120 KiB  
Article
Thallusin Quantification in Marine Bacteria and Algae Cultures
by Johann F. Ulrich, Melina S. Gräfe, Seema Dhiman, Paul Wienecke, Hans-Dieter Arndt and Thomas Wichard
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(11), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20110690 - 01 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2118
Abstract
Thallusin, a highly biologically active, phytohormone-like and bacterial compound-inducing morphogenesis of the green tide-forming macroalga Ulva (Chlorophyta), was determined in bacteria and algae cultures. A sensitive and selective method was developed for quantification based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and [...] Read more.
Thallusin, a highly biologically active, phytohormone-like and bacterial compound-inducing morphogenesis of the green tide-forming macroalga Ulva (Chlorophyta), was determined in bacteria and algae cultures. A sensitive and selective method was developed for quantification based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and a high-resolution mass spectrometer. Upon C18 solid phase extraction of the water samples, thallusin was derivatized with iodomethane to inhibit the formation of Fe–thallusin complexes interfering with the chromatographic separation. The concentration of thallusin was quantified during the relevant phases of the bacterial growth of Maribacter spp., ranging from 0.16 ± 0.01 amol cell−1 (at the peak of the exponential growth phase) to 0.86 ± 0.13 amol cell−1 (late stationary phase), indicating its accumulation in the growth medium. Finally, we directly determined the concentration of thallusin in algal culture to validate our approach for monitoring applications. Detection and quantification limits of 2.5 and 7.4 pmol L−1, respectively, were reached, which allow for quantifying ecologically relevant thallusin concentrations. Our approach will enable the surveying of thallusin in culture and in nature and will thus contribute to the chemical monitoring of aquaculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Natural Products from Bacteria)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop