Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481). This special issue belongs to the section "Magnetic Resonances".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 22609

Special Issue Editor

Department of Applied Physics, New York University Tandon School of Engineering, New York, NY 11201, USA
Interests: quantum computation; magnetic resonance; neutrino radiation; astrophysics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I would like to invite you to publish review or research articles on advances in magnetic force microscopy in a Special Issue of Magnetochemistry.

The tentative topics are as follows:

  • Ferromagnetic probes (including super sharp probes).
  • Imaging and image interpretation (including high spatial resolution and high speed imaging).
  • Applications (including application to magnetic data storage, magnetic recording, materials development, micromagnetism, and industrial applications).
  • Magnetic resonance force microscopy and its applications.
  • Other topics related to magnetic force microscopy.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Applied Sciences.

Sincerely yours,

Prof. Dr. Vladimir I. Tsifrinovich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

Magnetic force microscopy

Magnetic resonance force microscopy

Ferromagnetic probes

Imaging

Spatial resolution

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 6315 KiB  
Article
Magnetic Domain Structure of Lu2.1Bi0.9Fe5O12 Epitaxial Films Studied by Magnetic Force Microscopy and Optical Second Harmonic Generation
Magnetochemistry 2022, 8(12), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry8120180 - 04 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1164
Abstract
Magnetic structure of functional magnetic dielectrics is traditionally of high interest. Here, we use the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and nonlinear-optical probe of second harmonic generation for studies of surface domain structure of monocrystalline [...] Read more.
Magnetic structure of functional magnetic dielectrics is traditionally of high interest. Here, we use the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and nonlinear-optical probe of second harmonic generation for studies of surface domain structure of monocrystalline Lu2.1Bi0.9Fe5O12 garnet films. The transformation of the magnetic domains under the application of the dc magnetic field is revealed by the MFM for both the top-view and the cleavage of the iron-garnet layer. Complementary magnetic force and second harmonic generation microscopy show that the considered film reveals the magnetization inclined with respect to the film’s normal, with its orientation being inhomogeneous within the film’s thickness. The second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy confirms the zigzag structure of the surface-closing domain with the magnetization containing in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization components. We believe that these features of magnetic behavior of garnet films are important for the design of garnet-based magnetic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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5 pages, 471 KiB  
Communication
A Qubit Represented by the Oscillator’s Quantum States in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy
Magnetochemistry 2022, 8(8), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry8080076 - 22 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1292
Abstract
We consider magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the situation when the frequency of the electron spin resonance matches the fundamental frequency of the cantilever with a ferromagnetic particle attached to its tip. We suggest that in this situation, the quantum states of [...] Read more.
We consider magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the situation when the frequency of the electron spin resonance matches the fundamental frequency of the cantilever with a ferromagnetic particle attached to its tip. We suggest that in this situation, the quantum states of the oscillating cantilever may represent a qubit. We develop a scheme for manipulation with the qubit state and derive the expression describing the Rabi oscillations of the qubit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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Review

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14 pages, 2458 KiB  
Review
Magnetic Force Microscopy in Physics and Biomedical Applications
Magnetochemistry 2022, 8(4), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry8040042 - 09 Apr 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3821
Abstract
Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) enables to characterize magnetic properties with submicron (nanoscale) resolution and without much demand on sample surface preparation. MFM can operate in a wide range of temperatures and environmental conditions, that is, vacuum, liquid, or air, therefore this technique has [...] Read more.
Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) enables to characterize magnetic properties with submicron (nanoscale) resolution and without much demand on sample surface preparation. MFM can operate in a wide range of temperatures and environmental conditions, that is, vacuum, liquid, or air, therefore this technique has already become the most common tool used to characterize variety of magnetic materials ranging from ferromagnetic thin films and 2D materials to biomedical and/or biological materials. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of MFM basic fundamentals in the frame of other related methods and, correspondingly, a brief overview of physics and chiefly biomedical as well as biological applications of MFM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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34 pages, 5023 KiB  
Review
Green Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: Principles of Green Chemistry and Raw Materials
Magnetochemistry 2021, 7(11), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry7110145 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 57 | Viewed by 10189
Abstract
Increased request for metal and metal oxide nanoparticles nanoparticles has led to their large-scale production using high-energy methods with various toxic solvents. This cause environmental contamination, thus eco-friendly “green” synthesis methods has become necessary. An alternative way to synthesize metal nanoparticles includes using [...] Read more.
Increased request for metal and metal oxide nanoparticles nanoparticles has led to their large-scale production using high-energy methods with various toxic solvents. This cause environmental contamination, thus eco-friendly “green” synthesis methods has become necessary. An alternative way to synthesize metal nanoparticles includes using bioresources, such as plants and plant products, bacteria, fungi, yeast, algae, etc. “Green” synthesis has low toxicity, is safe for human health and environment compared to other methods, meaning it is the best approach for obtaining metal and metal oxide nanoparticles. This review reveals 12 principles of “green” chemistry and examples of biological components suitable for “green” synthesis, as well as modern scientific research of eco-friendly synthesis methods of magnetic and metal nanoparticles. Particularly, using extracts of green tea, fruits, roots, leaves, etc., to obtain Fe3O4 NPs. The various precursors as egg white (albumen), leaf and fruit extracts, etc., can be used for the „green” synthesis of spinel magnetic NPs. “Green” nanoparticles are being widely used as antimicrobials, photocatalysts and adsorbents. “Green” magnetic nanoparticles demonstrate low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which allows for their biomedical application, especially for targeted drug delivery, contrast imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications. The synthesis of silver, gold, platinum and palladium nanoparticles using extracts from fungi, red algae, fruits, etc., has been described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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15 pages, 4987 KiB  
Review
Magnetic Force Microscopy on Nanofibers—Limits and Possible Approaches for Randomly Oriented Nanofiber Mats
Magnetochemistry 2021, 7(11), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry7110143 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2525
Abstract
Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) belongs to the methods that enable spatially resolved magnetization measurements on common thin-film samples or magnetic nanostructures. The lateral resolution can be much higher than in Kerr microscopy, another spatially resolved magnetization imaging technique, but since MFM commonly necessitates [...] Read more.
Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) belongs to the methods that enable spatially resolved magnetization measurements on common thin-film samples or magnetic nanostructures. The lateral resolution can be much higher than in Kerr microscopy, another spatially resolved magnetization imaging technique, but since MFM commonly necessitates positioning a cantilever tip typically within a few nanometers from the surface, it is often more complicated than other techniques. Here, we investigate the progresses in MFM on magnetic nanofibers that can be found in the literature during the last years. While MFM measurements on magnetic nanodots or thin-film samples can often be found in the scientific literature, reports on magnetic force microscopy on single nanofibers or chaotic nanofiber mats are scarce. The aim of this review is to show which MFM investigations can be conducted on magnetic nanofibers, where the recent borders are, and which ideas can be transferred from MFM on other rough surfaces towards nanofiber mats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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16 pages, 7312 KiB  
Review
Magnetic Functionalization of Scanning Probes by Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition Technology
Magnetochemistry 2021, 7(10), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry7100140 - 13 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2473
Abstract
The fabrication of nanostructures with high resolution and precise control of the deposition site makes Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) a unique nanolithography process. In the case of magnetic materials, apart from the FEBID potential in standard substrates for multiple applications in [...] Read more.
The fabrication of nanostructures with high resolution and precise control of the deposition site makes Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID) a unique nanolithography process. In the case of magnetic materials, apart from the FEBID potential in standard substrates for multiple applications in data storage and logic, the use of this technology for the growth of nanomagnets on different types of scanning probes opens new paths in magnetic sensing, becoming a benchmark for magnetic functionalization. This work reviews the recent advances in the integration of FEBID magnetic nanostructures onto cantilevers to produce advanced magnetic sensing devices with unprecedented performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Magnetic Force Microscopy)
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