Advances in Composites Manufacturing: Machines, Systems and Processes

A special issue of Machines (ISSN 2075-1702). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Manufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 3226

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Composites have been finding applications in several types of structures, from simple applications to highly challenging ones such as the aerospace, naval and automotive industries or even for power generation (e.g., wind turbines). Current efforts from research teams and manufacturers mainly focus on the sustainability of the composites, addressing the material's origin, the sustainability of the manufacturing process, and the end of life (re-use, disassembly, etc.). Another crucial design characteristic is its composite performance, where significant advances have been made in recent decades. However, there is still a long way to substitute, e.g., metallic alloys in applications such as aerospace. These advances have been possible mainly thanks to the development or the improvement of manufacturing composites, which are highly dependent on the technological level of the manufacturing equipment. In this sense, this Special Issue aims to provide a forum for researchers, engineers and practitioners to review the state of the art in high-performance manufacturing, particularly the machines, processes, systems and the underlying science and fundamentals, and to identify possible directions for future R&D and applications. Advances in the sustainability of the processes are also welcomed. Original contributions should discuss the innovative design, development, and application of these systems, emphasizing the knowledge, innovation, and insights recently accumulated and on opportunities and implications for the future.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

  • Prepreg systems;
  • Sealing systems;
  • Infusion and LRTM-based processes;
  • Additive manufacturing for composites;
  • Filament winding for pressurized vessels;
  • Hierarchical composites manufacturing;
  • Thermoplastic composites manufacturing;
  • Enhanced masterbatch formulas processing;
  • Advanced simulation of composites manufacturing;
  • Hot drape forming composites;
  • Net-shaped solutions;
  • Pultrusion for light weight structures;
  • Laminate composites manufacturing;
  • Fiber reinforcements;
  • Growing trends in process and technology;
  • Tooling;
  • Automation and sensors in composites manufacturing (e.g., automated fabric cutting);
  • High-performance composites manufacturing;
  • Continuous fiber 3D printing;
  • Piping and profile manufacturing;
  • Joining of composite structures.

Dr. Fábio Fernandes
Prof. Dr. António Bastos Pereira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Machines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • composites
  • manufacturing
  • systems and processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 24921 KiB  
Article
Development of a Compact Incremental Forming Machine
by Tatiana P. Resende, Gustavo P. Carmo, Daniel G. Afonso and Ricardo J. Alves de Sousa
Machines 2024, 12(2), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines12020086 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 906
Abstract
Since the beginning of the 21st century, incremental sheet-metal-forming processes, such as single-point incremental forming (SPIF), have been the subject of extensive research. The SPIF process is highlighted as an efficient and cost-effective solution for producing complex parts with different materials and scales, [...] Read more.
Since the beginning of the 21st century, incremental sheet-metal-forming processes, such as single-point incremental forming (SPIF), have been the subject of extensive research. The SPIF process is highlighted as an efficient and cost-effective solution for producing complex parts with different materials and scales, surpassing conventional methods and being ideal for small series and customized products. Various machines can be used to implement SPIF, such as adapted milling machines, serial robots, and dedicated machines, each with its own advantages. However, although it requires a higher initial investment, a dedicated machine offers superior performance. The objective of this project was the creation of a compact and portable dedicated machine, which included the design of suitable kinematics, a mechanical project, and numerical control. The structural design led to the optimization of the dimensions of the robot arms. Direct and indirect kinematics were analyzed. Finally, the careful selection and adaptation of components were carried out, bearing in mind the support system of the forming punch, including the selection and sizing of motors, reducers, and linear actuators. A functional early prototype was successfully built and tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composites Manufacturing: Machines, Systems and Processes)
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13 pages, 11303 KiB  
Article
Energy-Absorbing and Eco-Friendly Perspectives for Cork and WKSF Based Composites under Drop-Weight Impact Machine
by Mohammad Rauf Sheikhi, Selim Gürgen and Onder Altuntas
Machines 2022, 10(11), 1050; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines10111050 - 09 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1470
Abstract
Lightweight structures with high energy absorption capacity are in high demand for energy absorption applications in a variety of engineering fields, such as aerospace, automotive, and marine engineering. Anti-impact composites are made of energy-absorbing materials that are incorporated into structures to protect the [...] Read more.
Lightweight structures with high energy absorption capacity are in high demand for energy absorption applications in a variety of engineering fields, such as aerospace, automotive, and marine engineering. Anti-impact composites are made of energy-absorbing materials that are incorporated into structures to protect the occupant or sensitive components against strikes or falls. This study deals with an experimental investigation of multi-layer composites consisting of cork and warp-knitted spacer fabrics (WKSF) for anti-impact applications. Composites were designed and created with a laser cutting machine in eight different configurations. To measure the energy absorption of the manufactured composite samples, a low-velocity drop-tower machine was designed, and the maximum reaction force due to the strike of the impactor on the specimens was measured by a dynamometer located under the samples. Moreover, energy absorption and specific energy absorption capacities were calculated for each specimen. In the final part of this study, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the designed composites was calculated to understand the eco-friendly properties of the composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Composites Manufacturing: Machines, Systems and Processes)
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