Aerodynamics Applied to Turbomachinery

A special issue of Machines (ISSN 2075-1702). This special issue belongs to the section "Turbomachinery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2023) | Viewed by 6119

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre for Computational Engineering Sciences, School of Aerospace Transport and Manufacturing, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UK
Interests: computational engineering; computational fluid dynamics; compressible flows; computational aerodynamics; turbulence; numerical methods; gas turbines; wind turbines
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Guest Editor
Centre for Propulsion Engineering, School of Aerospace Transport and Manufacturing, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UK
Interests: propulsion engineering; turbomachinery; control systems; thermal management systems; optimization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Turbomachines are perhaps one the most important machines ever designed through the manipulation of the science of aerodynamics, and their applications are vast; they are used as the prime movers for power production and in the propulsion systems of aircrafts. The basic principle of operation for all types of turbomachinery is the same, but the aerodynamics of such machines can be particularly challenging due to the complex geometry, Reynolds number and Mach number of the flow. In terms of aerodynamics, there are several branches; in the larger context, the aerodynamics of turbomachinery can be divided into two sub-categories (i.e., external and internal aerodynamics). However, for turbomachines the internal aerodynamics are even more complex, with flow through compressors, fans, blowers, combustion chambers and turbines, such that in the compressors the flow is compressed while in the turbines the pressure is decreased. This presents hugely complex flow phenomena and truly makes turbomachinery a miracle of the science of aerodynamics.

This Special Issue will be devoted to the state-of-the-art research on the aerodynamics of turbomachines, as well as their components and sub-systems. We seek submissions with a broader perspective of external or internal flows that can include theoretical, experimental or computational investigations, as well as advanced thinking on the theme.

Dr. Zeeshan A. Rana
Dr. Soheil Jafari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Machines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • turbomachinery
  • aerodynamics
  • gas turbines
  • jet engines
  • compressors
  • turbochargers
  • fuel injection
  • gas turbine combustion
  • turbines
  • turbine blade cooling
  • fan aerodynamics
  • theory of gas turbines
  • experimental investigation
  • computational fluid dynamics
  • computational structural dynamics
  • fluid–structure interactions
  • unsteady flows
  • turbulence and turbulent flows
  • propulsion
  • flow control
  • thermal management
  • wind tunnel
  • drag reduction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 6905 KiB  
Article
Output Power and Wake Flow Characteristics of a Wind Turbine with Swept Blades
by Xiaoxi Huang, Junwei Yang, Zhiying Gao, Chenglong Sha and Hua Yang
Machines 2022, 10(10), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines10100876 - 28 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1931
Abstract
To study the output power and wake flow characteristics of a wind turbine with swept blades, taking the blade tip offset and the location of the sweep start as two variables, the straight blade of the DTU-LN221 baseline airfoil was optimally designed with [...] Read more.
To study the output power and wake flow characteristics of a wind turbine with swept blades, taking the blade tip offset and the location of the sweep start as two variables, the straight blade of the DTU-LN221 baseline airfoil was optimally designed with sweep. Then the designed wind turbine was numerically simulated, and the swept blade with the best optimal output power characteristics was selected for the wind tunnel test. The results indicate that for both forward and backward swept blades, increasing the blade tip offset and the sweep start location could decrease the power and thrust coefficients. Compared with the backward swept design, the forward swept design significantly improved the blades’ power characteristics. By adopting swept blades instead of straight blades, wind turbines could generate more power at high tip speed ratios, especially in yaw conditions. The streamwise velocity recovery of the wind turbine with swept blades was slower than that with straight blades as the lateral velocity near the wake region was higher than that with straight blades. Besides, the wind turbine with swept blades had a greater turbulence intensity of the wake near the wake center than that with straight blades with or without yaw condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aerodynamics Applied to Turbomachinery)
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21 pages, 10361 KiB  
Article
Multi-Objective Optimization of a Small Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine Blade for Generating the Maximum Startup Torque at Low Wind Speeds
by Vahid Akbari, Mohammad Naghashzadegan, Ramin Kouhikamali, Farhad Afsharpanah and Wahiba Yaïci
Machines 2022, 10(9), 785; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines10090785 - 08 Sep 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3042
Abstract
Generating a high startup torque is a critical factor for the application of small wind turbines in regions with low wind speed. In the present study, the blades of a small wind turbine were designed and optimized to maximize the output power and [...] Read more.
Generating a high startup torque is a critical factor for the application of small wind turbines in regions with low wind speed. In the present study, the blades of a small wind turbine were designed and optimized to maximize the output power and startup torque. For this purpose, the chord length and the twist angle were considered as design variables, and a multi-objective optimization study was used to assess the optimal blade geometry. The blade element momentum (BEM) technique was used to calculate the design goals and the genetic algorithm was utilized to perform the optimization. The BEM method and the optimization tools were verified with wind tunnel test results of the base turbine and Schmitz equations, respectively. The results showed that from the aerodynamic viewpoint, the blade of a small wind turbine can be divided into two sections: r/R < 0.52, which is responsible for generating the startup torque, and r/R ≥ 0.52, where most of the turbine power is generated. By increasing the chord length and twist angle (especially chord length) in the r/R < 0.52 section and following the ideal chord length and twist angle distributions in the r/R ≥ 0.52 part, a 140% rise in the startup torque of the designed blade was observed with only a 1.5% reduction in power coefficient, compared with the base blade. Thereby, the startup wind speed was reduced from 6 m/s for the base blade to 4 m/s for the designed blade, which provides greater possibilities for the operation of this turbine in areas with lower wind speeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aerodynamics Applied to Turbomachinery)
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