Tribology of Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 7857

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Materials Engineering and Physics, Cracow University of Technology, 31-864 Cracow, Poland
Interests: tribology; biomaterials; boundary lubrication; wear; friction; fatigue; fracture; nanoparticles; polymers; ceramics; hydroxyapatite

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biomaterials used in bone regeneration are required to exhibit good biological compatibility, appropriate surface morphology, biostability or biodegradability, good mechanical and tribological properties, such as high strength and high resistance to fatigue, abrasion and corrosion. In order to replace tissue in a heavily loaded region of bone, such as knee or hip, only advanced implants produced with innovative materials are recommended; furthermore, their biotribology and biotribocorrosion properties require investigation. All aspects of tribology concerned with biological systems and implantable biomaterials are related to the movement between the implanted biomaterial and the natural tissue in physiologically fluid environments.

In recent years, scientific attention has been focused on hip, knee joints, articular cartilage biomechanical behavior, and synovial lubrication. This Special Issue aims to present manuscripts which may address, but are not be limited to:

  • Experimental methods and mechanical measurements for characterizing properties of implantable biomaterials;
  • The biotribology and biotribocorrosive properties of new emerging biomaterials;
  • Materials with enhanced lubrication properties;
  • Friction, lubrication and wear of biomaterials for bone regeneration lubricated with simulated physiological fluids.

The covered topics could be approached by in vivo and in vitro experimental investigation.

Dr. Agnieszka Maria Tomala
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biotribology
  • tribology
  • friction
  • wear
  • lubrication
  • biocomposites
  • composites
  • mechanical properties
  • physiological fluids
  • implants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 5732 KiB  
Article
Sliding Corrosion Fatigue of Metallic Joint Implants: A Comparative Study of CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V in Simulated Synovial Environments
by Jae Joong Ryu, Edward Cudjoe, Mihir V. Patel and Matt Caputo
Lubricants 2022, 10(4), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants10040065 - 13 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2066
Abstract
Mechanical contact in a corrosive synovial environment leads to progressive surface damage at the modular interface of the joint implants. The wear debris and corrosion products degrade the synovial fluids and change the lubrication mechanisms at the joints. Consequently, the unstable joint lubrication [...] Read more.
Mechanical contact in a corrosive synovial environment leads to progressive surface damage at the modular interface of the joint implants. The wear debris and corrosion products degrade the synovial fluids and change the lubrication mechanisms at the joints. Consequently, the unstable joint lubrication and corrosion products will further induce the undesirable performance of the joint implants. In this study, the two major joint materials, CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V, were tested during the course of reciprocal sliding contact in simulated synovial liquids. Open circuit potential and coefficient of friction were monitored to describe electrochemical and mechanical responses. Potentiostatic test results illustrated electrochemical damage on both surfaces that modified oxidation chemistry on both surfaces. However, more significant modification of the CoCrMo surface was detected during wear in the simulated joint liquid. Even with a reduced coefficient of friction on the CoCrMo surface in sodium lactate environments, fretting current density drastically increased in corrosive sodium lactate with pH 2. However, the test results from the Ti6Al4V surface presented less coefficient of friction values, and moderate change in fretting current. Therefore, the experimental study concluded that the biocompatibility of Ti6Al4V is superior to that of CoCrMo in the combined effect of mechanical loadings and an electrochemical environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration)
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15 pages, 5969 KiB  
Article
Tribological Properties and Physiochemical Analysis of Polymer-Ceramic Composite Coatings for Bone Regeneration
by Agnieszka Maria Tomala, Dagmara Słota, Wioletta Florkiewicz, Karina Piętak, Mateusz Dyląg and Agnieszka Sobczak-Kupiec
Lubricants 2022, 10(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants10040058 - 2 Apr 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2541
Abstract
The biomaterial coatings for bone tissue regeneration described in this study promote bioactivity. The ceramic-polymer composite coatings deposited on polylactide (PLA) plates contain polymers, namely polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/polyethylene glycol (PEG), while the ceramic phase is hydroxyapatite (HA). Additionally, collagen (COL) and glutathione (GSH) are [...] Read more.
The biomaterial coatings for bone tissue regeneration described in this study promote bioactivity. The ceramic-polymer composite coatings deposited on polylactide (PLA) plates contain polymers, namely polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/polyethylene glycol (PEG), while the ceramic phase is hydroxyapatite (HA). Additionally, collagen (COL) and glutathione (GSH) are components of high biological value. Bone tissue materials requires additionally demanding tribological properties, which are thoroughly described in this research. These findings, presented herein for the first time, characterize this type of highly specific composite coating material and their indicate possible application in bone regeneration implants. Implementation of the collagen in the PVP/PEG/HA composite matrix can tailor demanding tribological performance, e.g., anti-wear and friction reduction. The addition of the ceramic phase in too high a content (15%) leads to the decreased swelling ability of materials and slower liquid medium absorption by composite coatings, as well as strong surface roughening and loosening tribological properties. In consequence, small particles of HA from the very rough composite crumble, having a strong abrasive effect on the sample surface. In conclusion, sample C composed of PVP/PEG/GSH/COL/HA (5%) exhibits high bioactivity, strong mechanical and tribological properties, the highest free surface energy, porosity, and accepted roughness to be implemented as a material for bone regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration)
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19 pages, 2148 KiB  
Article
Improving the Endoprosthesis Design and the Postoperative Therapy as a Means of Reducing Complications Risks after Total Hip Arthroplasty
by Valentin L. Popov, Aleksandr M. Poliakov and Vladimir I. Pakhaliuk
Lubricants 2022, 10(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants10030038 - 4 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2509
Abstract
One of the most high-tech, efficient and reliable surgical procedures is Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Due to the increase in average life expectancy, it is especially relevant for older people suffering from chronic joint disease, allowing them to return to an active lifestyle. [...] Read more.
One of the most high-tech, efficient and reliable surgical procedures is Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Due to the increase in average life expectancy, it is especially relevant for older people suffering from chronic joint disease, allowing them to return to an active lifestyle. However, the rejuvenation of such a severe joint disease as osteoarthritis requires the search for new solutions that increase the lifespan of a Total Hip Replacement (THR). Current trends in the development of this area are primarily focused on the creation of new materials used in THR and methods for their processing that meet the requirements of biocompatibility, long-term strength, wear resistance and the absence of an immune system response aimed at rejection. This study is devoted to the substantiation of one of the possible approaches to increase the reliability and durability of THR, based on the improvement of the implant design and postoperative rehabilitation technology, potentially reducing the risk of complications in the postoperative period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration)
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