Tribology of Textured Surfaces

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5182

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
Interests: nano-surface-engineering; nanomechanics; nanotribology

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
Interests: surface engineering; tribology; micro/nano additive manufacturing; in situ SEM nanomechanical and nanotribological characterization

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Guest Editor
College of Engineering & Computer Science, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR 72401, USA
Interests: surface science and engineering; experimental nanomechanics; computational materials science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to extend an invitation for submissions to a Special Issue on the subject of "Tribology of Textured Surfaces". Our aim with this issue is to compile a comprehensive collection of the most recent, cutting-edge developments and innovations in the field of textured surface tribology.

We are seeking both review articles and original research that provide theoretical explorations, ground-breaking experimental research, and inventive computational approaches. These contributions will help deepen our understanding of the mechanisms at play on multiple scales. We also encourage novel applications that push the existing boundaries of this field. The scope of this issue includes topics such as friction, wear, lubrication, and contact mechanics in the context of macro-, micro-, and nano-textured surfaces, as well as surface engineering techniques and the design and fabrication of these engineered surfaces.

We are particularly eager to receive submissions from a diverse range of academics, industry researchers, and practitioners who are contributing to this rapidly evolving field. This call for papers represents an exceptional opportunity for your work to reach a broad audience and for you to engage with others in your field.

Prof. Dr. Min Zou
Dr. Mahyar Afshar-Mohajer
Dr. Robert “Drew” Fleming
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • textured surfaces
  • friction
  • wear
  • lubrication
  • contact mechanics
  • surface engineering
  • microfabrication
  • nanofabrication
  • surface design

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 31320 KiB  
Article
A Comprehensive Numerical Study of a Wedge-Shaped Textured Convergent Oil Film Gap
by Raphael Scharf, Michael Maier, Michael Pusterhofer and Florian Grün
Lubricants 2024, 12(4), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12040121 - 5 Apr 2024
Viewed by 653
Abstract
The modification of surface geometries to reduce friction is an omnipresent topic of research. In nature, different low-friction surfaces, such as fish skins, exist. To transfer this knowledge to technical applications, for example, to journal or plain bearings, many numerical and experimental studies [...] Read more.
The modification of surface geometries to reduce friction is an omnipresent topic of research. In nature, different low-friction surfaces, such as fish skins, exist. To transfer this knowledge to technical applications, for example, to journal or plain bearings, many numerical and experimental studies of textured surfaces have been performed. In this work, the influence of the geometric parameters (texture length l, width b, angle α and start position xstart) of a wedge-shaped texture on three different convergent oil film gaps was analyzed in full-film lubrication and compared with untextured oil film gaps. With the aid of a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model, a comprehensive variation study was conducted, and the best-performing wedge-shaped texture was determined. The results show that an open texture at the inlet provides the largest improvement. Furthermore, it can be observed that the optimal relative texture width and absolute inlet height for the three investigated oil film gaps are similar. In contrast to the volume flow of the untextured geometry, the volume flow of the textured one is significantly higher, especially that perpendicular to the movement direction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Textured Surfaces)
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14 pages, 12904 KiB  
Article
Laser Surface Texturing for Ground Surface: Frictional Effect of Plateau Roughness and Surface Textures under Oil Lubrication
by Hongzhi Yue, Johannes Schneider and Jianxin Deng
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010022 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1303
Abstract
Laser surface texturing has proven beneficial in improving tribological performance in different lubrication regimes. However, the interaction between plateau roughness and surface texture remains to be further investigated, even though rough surfaces are common in engineering applications. In the present study, we investigated [...] Read more.
Laser surface texturing has proven beneficial in improving tribological performance in different lubrication regimes. However, the interaction between plateau roughness and surface texture remains to be further investigated, even though rough surfaces are common in engineering applications. In the present study, we investigated the frictional influence of surface texturing of ground surfaces under different lubrication conditions. Channel textures with different depths and area ratios were fabricated on ground surfaces, and their friction was tested in reciprocating tests. The experimental findings indicate that the textures caused increased friction for ground surfaces under boundary or mixed lubrication when the interface is well lubricated. Nevertheless, when the oil supply was limited, an up to 40% friction reduction was observed under test conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Textured Surfaces)
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23 pages, 18505 KiB  
Article
Multi-Field Coupling Numerical Analysis and Experimental Validation of Surface-Textured Metal Seals in Roller Cone Bits
by Yi Ma, Ziang Li, Ziyang Yuan, Xiangkai Meng, Xudong Peng and Jinbo Jiang
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010015 - 6 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Metal seals play a crucial role in ensuring the dependable functioning of the bearing system in roller cone bits. Due to the intricate nature of downhole conditions, the microstructure design of sealing end faces, specifically the surface texture, is rarely used in metal [...] Read more.
Metal seals play a crucial role in ensuring the dependable functioning of the bearing system in roller cone bits. Due to the intricate nature of downhole conditions, the microstructure design of sealing end faces, specifically the surface texture, is rarely used in metal seals. This study focuses on examining the applicability of surface texture technology in metal seals for cone bits to enhance the lubrication characteristics and friction and wear properties of liquid film between end faces. A multi-field coupling model of surface-textured metal seals was established and experimentally verified. The liquid film carrying the capacity and sealing performance of five different shapes of surface-textured end faces (circle, ellipse I (horizontal), ellipse II (vertical), triangle, and chevron) were investigated under varying rotational speeds and environmental pressures. The influences of texture parameters, including depth and area ratio, on the lubrication characteristics and friction reduction effects of surface-textured metal seals were investigated, and the microscopic wear morphology characteristics of the sealing end faces were analyzed. The results show that surface textures can effectively improve the liquid film state and comprehensive performance of metal seals. Specifically, triangle textures significantly enhance the hydrodynamic pressure effect and weaken the abrasive wear and adhesive wear of the end faces. However, when the environmental pressure is p ≥ 30 MPa, the surface textures gradually lose the advantages of dynamic lubrication but can still reduce friction. The proper texture depth and area ratio can achieve zero leakage (obtained theoretically) and minimal friction in metal seals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Textured Surfaces)
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16 pages, 8180 KiB  
Article
Deterministic Simulation of Surface Textures for the Piston Ring/Cylinder Liner System in a Free Piston Linear Engine
by Felipe Kevin Correia Luz, Francisco J. Profito, Marcelo Braga dos Santos, Samuel A. N. Silva and Henara Lillian Costa
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010012 - 3 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1406
Abstract
The use of synthesis gas (SYNGAS) from waste gasification has been pointed out as a key strategy to help the energy transition. However, SYNGAS’ low calorific power is considered a difficult obstacle to its technological use in internal combustion engines. To overcome this, [...] Read more.
The use of synthesis gas (SYNGAS) from waste gasification has been pointed out as a key strategy to help the energy transition. However, SYNGAS’ low calorific power is considered a difficult obstacle to its technological use in internal combustion engines. To overcome this, a novel free-piston linear motor has been proposed to pave the way for the use of SYNGAS in the mobility sector. Surface texturing has vast potential to reduce friction losses in this system. This study utilizes a deterministic numerical model to investigate the mixed lubrication performance of a textured piston ring/cylinder liner conjunction in a free piston engine. The model considers the simultaneous solution of the lubrication and asperity contact problems at the roughness scale, including texturing features on the cylinder surface. The numerical model employs the Reynolds equation with mass-conserving cavitation to calculate the inter-asperity fluid pressure. The rough contact model utilizes the Hertz theory for elastic contact to calculate the contact pressure at each asperity between the piston liner surface and the admitted smooth and rigid ring surface. Surface texturing demonstrated remarkable effectiveness, particularly in the hydrodynamic lubrication regime, with a maximum friction reduction of 38.5% observed for an area coverage of 50%. This was accompanied by a notable shift in the transition from the boundary to the mixed lubrication regime. The textured surfaces exhibited consistent efficiency in reducing fluid pressure and shear stress as the coverage of the textured areas increased. The incorporation of dimples on these surfaces played a crucial role by augmenting the lubricant storage capacity while concurrently reducing the real shear and contact areas. This study offers valuable insights into the nuanced friction-reducing mechanisms of surface textures, illuminating their influence on the coefficient of friction and the formation of lubricant films across various lubrication regimes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Textured Surfaces)
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