The Clinical Application of Brain–Machine Interfaces (BMIs)

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1448

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: Brain-Machine interfaces, neurophysiology, somatosensory cortex, motor cortex

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Brain–machine interfaces (BMIs), also known as brain–computer interfaces (BCIs), are often defined as devices that use neural activity to control other devices. The concept of BMIs has evolved over the past decade to include various classes and variants. In other words, BMIs are becoming increasingly relevant in clinical and non-clinical settings, extending well beyond their initial proposed uses, with multiple other applications currently being tested. This means that BMIs currently being tested in non-clinical environments may hold the potential to become relevant in clinical settings.

In this Special Issue, we invite research studies and reviews regarding the current and future clinical applications of BMIs. We aim to provide a comprehensive representation of the various fields in which BMIs are being employed. To complement the existing findings and forecast forthcoming clinical applications, pre-clinical studies involving animal models may also be considered. It is expected that this Special Issue will help to identify the current limitations and areas with the potential for growth in the field of clinical BMIs.

Dr. Miguel Pais-Vieira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain–machine interfaces
  • brain–computer interfaces
  • neurorehabilitation
  • neuroengineering
  • neurophysiology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

22 pages, 2571 KiB  
Article
Activation of a Rhythmic Lower Limb Movement Pattern during the Use of a Multimodal Brain–Computer Interface: A Case Study of a Clinically Complete Spinal Cord Injury
by Carla Pais-Vieira, José Gabriel Figueiredo, André Perrotta, Demétrio Matos, Mafalda Aguiar, Júlia Ramos, Márcia Gato, Tânia Poleri and Miguel Pais-Vieira
Life 2024, 14(3), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14030396 - 16 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1254
Abstract
Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) that integrate virtual reality with tactile feedback are increasingly relevant for neurorehabilitation in spinal cord injury (SCI). In our previous case study employing a BCI-based virtual reality neurorehabilitation protocol, a patient with complete T4 SCI experienced reduced pain and emergence [...] Read more.
Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) that integrate virtual reality with tactile feedback are increasingly relevant for neurorehabilitation in spinal cord injury (SCI). In our previous case study employing a BCI-based virtual reality neurorehabilitation protocol, a patient with complete T4 SCI experienced reduced pain and emergence of non-spastic lower limb movements after 10 sessions. However, it is still unclear whether these effects can be sustained, enhanced, and replicated, as well as the neural mechanisms that underlie them. The present report outlines the outcomes of extending the previous protocol with 24 more sessions (14 months, in total). Clinical, behavioral, and neurophysiological data were analyzed. The protocol maintained or reduced pain levels, increased self-reported quality of life, and was frequently associated with the appearance of non-spastic lower limb movements when the patient was engaged and not experiencing stressful events. Neural activity analysis revealed that changes in pain were encoded in the theta frequency band by the left frontal electrode F3. Examination of the lower limbs revealed alternating movements resembling a gait pattern. These results suggest that sustained use of this BCI protocol leads to enhanced quality of life, reduced and stable pain levels, and may result in the emergence of rhythmic patterns of lower limb muscle activity reminiscent of gait. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Clinical Application of Brain–Machine Interfaces (BMIs))
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